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> Books 2nd Edition, Foreword by m0r1arty
Jubei
post Jan 8 2007, 11:47 AM
Post #181


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Finished Ringworld and Into a Dark Realm as well now.

Ringworld - Incredible ideas - The Artifact itself, the vulnerability of the civilisation, the Birthright Lotteries, the meddling Piersons puppeteers, the consequences in terms of weather/resource/requirement of living on a ringworld BUT where was the story. It seemed to move from one story to another, first about the Ringworld, then about the aliens, then about the 'luck of Teela Brown' and never settled. The ending went nowhere at all. Sadly dissapointing.

Into a Dark Realm - Another Feist book full of continuity errors, spelling and grammatical errors and rushed/pointless bits of story. The big twist at the end was far too obvious. I'd have been more pleased if i'd been proven wrong, even if it would have introduced yet more characters into the fray. Also sadly disappointing.

Now reading Pushing Ice. So far I am REALLY REALLY enjoying this. No 30 gee acceleration, no ship fields and AI sorting everything out. The ship can manage half a gee at a push and bits start falling off. The crew really drive the ship, it's more akin to a modern day sub than a normal sci-fi ship. Reynolds has created a tangible atmosphere aboard the ship, I can almost imagine being among the crew. At the same time he's weaving a pretty interesting story around the characters and situation. Accidents, a death, a murder, conspiracies, mystery. Excellent so far.
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thirtyhelens
post Jan 11 2007, 07:09 PM
Post #182


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Received Mountain Man Dance Moves from Craig. Not finished yet, but I have to observe...

QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Jan 3 2007, 08:16 PM)
the finished copy has a kick-ass unicorn on the cover.  laugh.gif
*



So far, "Names for Tough Unicorns" is my favorite.

Drill Bitch. laugh.gif
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Sostie
post Jan 18 2007, 01:22 PM
Post #183


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Just finished PUNK ROCK - An Oral History by John Robb. Of all the books I've read about the original punk explosion this was certainly one of, if not the best. On par with the (apparently) seminal England's Dreaming by John Savage.
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mcraigclark
post Jan 18 2007, 03:07 PM
Post #184


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QUOTE (Sostie @ Jan 18 2007, 08:22 AM)
Just finished PUNK ROCK - An Oral History by John Robb.  Of all the books I've read about the original punk explosion this was certainly one of, if not the best.  On par with the (apparently) seminal England's Dreaming by John Savage.
*

This is the one that's just about the British punk explosion, yes?
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Jessopjessopjess...
post Jan 18 2007, 03:44 PM
Post #185


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QUOTE (Jubei @ Jan 8 2007, 12:47 PM)
Reynolds has created a tangible atmosphere aboard the ship, I can almost imagine being among the crew.
*

Good stuff matey. The characterisation was also my favourite thing about the book; it proves his critics wrong, not that I agreed in the first place.

I just finished American Gods. What a disappointment. I was expecting a meandering story given Gaiman's introduction, but what came after was so uneventful it was nothing but an anticlimax.

I have no problem with a slow-burner whatsoever, but even the tallest story needs to be punctuated with action. And I don't mean T 'n' A. Over 100 pages in and there was an exciting glimpse of where I hoped the story was going - Shadow, our hero, sees the Gods in their true forms - but this was all but eschewed for Shadow's own personal development right until the end. Even then, the climax was low-key. The irony of that ending was not lost on me, but after long periods of boredom spanning 600 pages, I was desperate for something to grab my attention.

This post has been edited by Jessopjessopjessop: Jan 18 2007, 03:45 PM
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Sostie
post Jan 18 2007, 03:59 PM
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QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Jan 18 2007, 03:07 PM)
This is the one that's just about the British punk explosion, yes?
*



It is. It's made up of interviews with major players and fans of the time. It doesn't focus much (if at all) on the New York or Detroit scenes a few years earlier, only when they are talking about the music they were listening to before punk. Though very few seem to be inspired by solely Iggy, New York Dolls etc but more by the Pub-rock scene, Mott The Hoople, Bowie, Roxy Music and dub reggae. etc. It focusses just on the UK scene and after, which was very different to the US scene.
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maian
post Jan 24 2007, 09:02 PM
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Finished Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell today and, apart from the first and last parts Ewing's journal which I found a bit tough to get through I thought it was a wonderful read. The various different parts were all handled very well and it was fun spotting the links between them.

Next up is The Affirmation by Christopher Priest.
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shinyelvenqueen
post Jan 24 2007, 10:02 PM
Post #188


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QUOTE (maian @ Jan 24 2007, 09:02 PM)
Finished Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell today and, apart from the first and last parts Ewing's journal which I found a bit tough to get through I thought it was a wonderful read. The various different parts were all handled very well and it was fun spotting the links between them.
*



Not to pick on your opinion, but this is just a general heads up to everyone who read it.
I don't understand why anyone enjoyed it. I didn't, maybe I didn't get it although I thought it was easy enough to read but felt it pointless, lacking depth, strung together like play-do and matchsticks. I did however enjoy the individual stories which were entertaining in their own right.

I mean, am I such a hardened reader that I cannot see the softness of the seperate characters? Or did I simply not get it? I am frustrated by it because everyone I spoke to raved on like it was the best thing since sliced bread.

Anyhoo, it's not that a big deal, just a little niggle I get over this particular book.
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maian
post Jan 24 2007, 10:21 PM
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I'm not sure what you mean by the ''softness'' of the characters but I thought that all the characters were very well realised and that the use of different presentational techniques for all the stories really helped to convey their particular story. I also felt that the book worked well as a collection of stories but it could also work as a whole piece about interconnectivity, reincarnation and all that jazz.
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shinyelvenqueen
post Jan 24 2007, 10:26 PM
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Well, whatever floats your boat really.

By softness, which I didn't convey properly (never were good at communikatin') I think I meant "Empathy". But I never was good with all that emotional type stuff either.
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sleeping_pirate
post Feb 11 2007, 12:21 PM
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The Call Of The Weird- Louis Theroux. A very good read so far!
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mcraigclark
post Feb 15 2007, 03:10 PM
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I don't read manga much, but I was sent a copy of Abandon the Old in Tokyo by Yoshihiro Tatsumi last month and I only just got around to reading it. It's very different to modern manga. The art is more realistic and the subjects of the stories (Abandon... is a collection of short stories) deal with more banal plots than its modern cousins. Tatsumi wrote and drew the stories back in 1970; his work has only recently been made available outside of Japan and he's apparently considered the godfather of manga, so if you read manga often you might want to check this out.
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Jessopjessopjess...
post Feb 15 2007, 04:18 PM
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From Richard K Morgan.com

So it's done. Black Man is complete delivered, line edited and polished to a high gloss. Waiting now on the copy edit and galley proofs. Editorial comment runs to your best book so far by some margin. Which I confess I'm quite relieved to hear. It'd be pretty mortifying to spend two years on something, pile delay on delay, and come out at the end of it all with some weak-assed shit that's a step down from previous work. I think it's safe to say I gouged more out of myself to write this novel than anything else I've worked on so far.
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Julie
post Feb 15 2007, 04:24 PM
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I'm reading Generation X by Douglas Coupland.

I'm actually really sad that it's the last book of his I haven't read. I don't know what I'll do without him!
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Jessopjessopjess...
post Feb 15 2007, 04:44 PM
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More good news for SF bods:

QUOTE (alastair reynolds)
THE PREFECT, a new novel in the REVELATION SPACE universe, will appear in April 2007. I'll post a full-size image of the cover as soon as the final design is settled.

Here's the cover copy:

Tom Dreyfus is a Prefect, a policeman of sorts, and one of the best. His force is Panoply, and his beat is the multi-faceted utopian society of the Glitter Band, that vast swirl of space habitats orbiting the planet Yellowstone, the teeming hub of a human interstellar empire spanning many worlds. These days, his job is his life.

A murderous attack against a Glitter Band habitat is nasty, but it looks to be an open-and-shut case - until Dreyfus starts looking under stones that some very powerful people would really rather stayed unturned. What he uncovers is far more serious than mere gruesome murder: a covert takeover bid by a shadowy figure, Aurora (who may once have been human but certainly isn't now) who believes the people of the Glitter Band should no longer be in charge of their own destiny.

Before long Dreyfus and his team are fighting against something worse than tyranny . . . and Dreyfus discovers that to save something precious, you may have to destroy part of it.

The Prefect: a rollercoaster ride through the dark and turbulent universe of Revelation Space; an interstellar thriller where nothing - and no one - is what they seem . . .
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