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> Books 2nd Edition, Foreword by m0r1arty
Jubei
post Oct 21 2007, 06:35 PM
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Just bought a book at the airport on the way on holiday, The Eternity Artifact by L E Modesitt. For an airport book on a whim, it was actually really very good. An interesting story, neat twists, nice way of giving different characters interpretations of the same events based on their personal biases. A bit formulaic in its setting up of the cultures: Western, Orthodox Christian, Muslim, Chinese etc. However, I'd definately recommend it.
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Jessopjessopjess...
post Oct 21 2007, 07:47 PM
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Thanks to the very kind Mr. Chappers, I'm reading 'A Fire Upon the Deep' by Vernon Vinge. It's skewed, universe-spanning SF that I'm enjoying so far.
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maian
post Oct 21 2007, 08:11 PM
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QUOTE (maian @ Sep 24 2007, 11:41 AM)
I've now started Lamb, The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore and am thoroughly enjoying it. Like any decent religious satire it has clearly resulted from a lot of research and thorough understanding of the Judeo-Christian belief system on the part of Moore. That it is also very broad in comedic terms and focuses just as much on the slapstick and witty dialogue as the theology adds to the fun immensely.
*


Finished this this morning and it was a very, very good book indeed. Although the fictionalised parts of Jesus' childhood were thoroughly entertaining and funny, particularly Moore tackling the age old question of whether or not Jesus knew Kung Fu, I found the sections based on the events described by the Apostles infinitely more fascinating, particularly his take on the reason for Jesus sacrificing himself which was one I had not considered before. The afterword in which Moore explained the reasoning behind his portrayals of the various characters were also very interesting and revealed just how much research had gone into the writing of the book. Of particular note was the fact that he cleared up a few misconceptions about the Bible, such as the fact that at no point does it say Mary Magdalene was a whore and that was why his portrayal of her was based on the ''washing Jesus' feet'' moment.

Hugely entertaining and quite provocative, though it's greatest accomplishment is just being an absurdly silly book.

I also started and finished David Mamet's Bambi Vs. Godzilla: On The Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business which I started at noon and finished a few minutes ago, despite having travelled to Manchester and back in the intervening hours. The book was so terrifyingly addictive and engrossing that I couldn't leave it for more than a minute at any one time without feeling the overwhelming need to read it again.

It is without a doubt one of the best books about the making of movies that I have ever read. Admittedly I've only read a few, but it is definitely up there with William Goldman's books on screenwriting in revealing the difficulty of getting a decent film made in an age where focus groups are considered a vital part of the film-making progress. In fact it may be more revealing than Goldman's work due to Mamet's career as a director, though that's just my opinion.

Taking aim at executives, stars and the very nature of the industry itself, it's scathing, candid and hilarious throughout. The best moments for me being Mamet's examination of the move from plot to premise based comedy films (such as the Ealing films, It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World) to premise based films (such as the work of the Farrelly brothers) in recent years, his dissection of Preston Sturges' The Lady Eve and illustrating how it is one of the most perfect scripts ever written and a story about the making of an adaptation of Anne Frank's Diary which illustrated the part that sudden inspiration and unplanned occurences can have in the making of a great film or scene.

It was also very interesting to read Mamet's theories on what makes a great script and what he has found to be the very basics of good writing.

Compulsive and enlightening.

This post has been edited by maian: Oct 21 2007, 08:15 PM
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mcraigclark
post Oct 22 2007, 03:40 PM
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How strange that you posted about Lamb. I was about to post this! WANT.
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sweetbutinsane
post Oct 28 2007, 12:22 PM
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Last week I read The Fade by Chris Wooding.

Brilliant, as always - imaginative and unique plot, interesting characters, fabulous description. I wasn't so sure about the first person present tense format at first, but I thought it worked very well. Overall, I thought it wasn't as good as The Braided Path or The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray, but it's definitely one of my favourite books of his.

I also finished The Gunslinger by Stephen King on Friday. I kept on reading the first couple of chapters, then forgetting to read it for ages, then going back and having to read the first few chapters again anyway to refresh my memory. In the end, I just sat down and read it all in one go on Friday morning.

Once I got into it, I found I really enjoyed it. Unfortunately, my library didn't have the second book in so I have to wait. sad.gif

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maian
post Oct 28 2007, 08:22 PM
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I finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy the other day and it was deserving of all the praise it has received. A genuinely heartwrenching tale of survival, love and devotion set against the backdrop of a terrifying and paranoiac post-apocalyptic world full of fear, mistrust and awful atrocities being committed by people against each other. Unremittingly bleak though it is, it is also quite redemptive and uplifting and I thought it was just a wonderful story. I really hope the John Hillcoat film version goes ahead, especially if they can get Viggo Mortensen to sign on for it, as is the current rumour.

Knowing I had two long train journeys to get to and from the Leeds Meet, I started and have now got quite far into This Book Will Save Your Life by A.M. Homes and, having had no real preconceptions beforehand, I have to say it has been something of a revelation. The story of one man being cut off from the world then trying to re-join it is something which I find very interesting and quite affecting and Homes' elegant prose and storytelling makes it an even more compelling read. Very good and I can't wait to read more.

This post has been edited by maian: Oct 28 2007, 09:10 PM
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widowspider
post Oct 29 2007, 11:30 PM
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QUOTE (maian @ Oct 28 2007, 09:22 PM)
I finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy the other day and it was deserving of all the praise it has received. A genuinely heartwrenching tale of survival, love and devotion set against the backdrop of a terrifying and paranoiac post-apocalyptic world full of fear, mistrust and awful atrocities being committed by people against each other. Unremittingly bleak though it is, it is also quite redemptive and uplifting and I thought it was just a wonderful story. I really hope the John Hillcoat film version goes ahead, especially if they can get Viggo Mortensen to sign on for it, as is the current rumour.
*

Ooooh. That would be good. Viggo has exactly the right qualities for that character.
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mcraigclark
post Oct 29 2007, 11:52 PM
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I hadn't heard that yet. Viggo would be great!
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maian
post Oct 30 2007, 08:28 AM
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It's still just a rumour at this stage, but it's got me think that no one else could play the role, he's just got everything the character needs. Plus, he has got some experience guarding small people and escorting them across tough terrain.
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Sostie
post Oct 31 2007, 11:50 AM
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Nature Girl by Carl Hiassen
Hiassen by numbers - a female lead, a villain whose luck just gets worse and worse, eccentrics & nutters, all set in Florida. As entertaining, engrossing and informative as usual.
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Sostie
post Oct 31 2007, 01:30 PM
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Just picked up...

Dawn Of The Dumb - Charlie Brooker
The Joke's Over - Ralph Steadman
What Happens Now - Jeremy Dyson
I Predict A Riot - Colin Bateman
I Never Knew That About London- Christopher Winn


Colin Bateman seems seems to have been re-branded as just "Bateman". His christian name seems to have been erased from the book. Hope the book's quality doesn't reflect the wankiness of the name change.
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mcraigclark
post Nov 1 2007, 11:31 PM
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QUOTE (Sostie @ Oct 31 2007, 07:50 AM)
Nature Girl by Carl Hiassen
Hiassen by numbers - a female lead, a villain whose luck just gets worse and worse, eccentrics & nutters, all set in Florida.  As entertaining, engrossing and informative as usual.
*

This is very good. Have you read Skinny Dip?
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Sostie
post Nov 1 2007, 11:57 PM
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QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Nov 1 2007, 11:31 PM)
This is very good.  Have you read Skinny Dip?
*



Indeed. I think I'm up to date now. Started many years ago with Stormy Weather, then went back to the beginning and have ploughed through them all. He never let's me down. Even Striptease was marvellous despite reading it after the movie's bad press.
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Atara
post Nov 2 2007, 10:26 AM
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Confessor is out soon. I am in the process of re-reading all the other books in the series before it does since it was over 5 years ago when I first started reading them
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GundamGuy_UK
post Nov 5 2007, 12:47 AM
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Make Your Own Damn Movie by Lloyd Kaufman. And look:

Hee hee....
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