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> Books 2nd Edition, Foreword by m0r1arty
maian
post Feb 19 2008, 07:50 PM
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Whilst sitting in a book shop earlier drinking coffee, I started reading Steve Martin's memoir Born Standing Up having read a few good things about it. Needless to say I was hooked from the very beginning. Beautifully written, it's a hilarious and heartfelt account of his stand-up career taking in everything from his early days as a magician who told some jokes, through his megastardom and his retirement from stand-up in 1981. It's also very candid about his relationship with his family, particularly his father, and it is at times very touching. A wonderful insight into a great comedic talent.
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ella
post Feb 19 2008, 11:23 PM
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In the Heart of the Sea which is an account of the event on which Moby Dick was based. The boat has just been nutted by the whale and I think that there is cannibalism coming. I think that I need to get a copy of Moby Dick to see how they compare.
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Raven
post Feb 20 2008, 10:24 AM
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QUOTE (ella @ Feb 19 2008, 11:23 PM)
In the Heart of the Sea which is an account of the event on which Moby Dick was based. The boat has just been nutted by the whale and I think that there is cannibalism coming. I think that I need to get a copy of Moby Dick to see how they compare.
*


I've got copies of both, and have tried - and failed - to read Moby Dick twice now.

I found it hard to get into Melville's writing style, but - oddly - what I did read I enjoyed, even though it was a bit of a slog! I still intend to read it through one day.

I've not attempted In the Heart of the Sea.
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ella
post Feb 20 2008, 10:51 AM
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QUOTE (Raven @ Feb 20 2008, 10:24 AM)
I've got copies of both, and have tried - and failed - to read Moby Dick twice now.

I found it hard to get into Melville's writing style, but - oddly - what I did read I enjoyed, even though it was a bit of a slog!  I still intend to read it through one day.

I've not attempted In the Heart of the Sea.
*


In the Heart of the Sea is very readable. Clips along at a nice pace and what description of whaling and Nantucket island life that is in there is very interesting stuff. Sounds like you might actually enjoy In the Heart of the Sea more than Moby Dick since I imagine that the content is rather similar but Philbrick's writing style is rather lighter.
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Raven
post Feb 20 2008, 11:26 AM
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I got it as part of a box set with two other books I was more interested in reading, and have always put off reading it because I want to finish Moby Dick first (so that I can compare the two the other way around).

If you want to find out more about the detail of whaling etc then Moby Dick will be the book for you, the amount of detail Melville packs in is amazing (he spends most of one chapter just talking about a dish of stew!).
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Jessopjessopjess...
post Feb 20 2008, 01:45 PM
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I have just started the latest Iain M Banks novel, 'Matter'. So far, so weird, but that's to be expected.

I should be finished just in time to start:



Reynolds has posted an excerpt here.

Marvellous.
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Julie
post Feb 20 2008, 02:31 PM
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I just finished Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Friend by Christopher Moore, thanks to the lovely Craig.

Hands down, the funniest thing I've ever read.
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PrincessKate
post Feb 20 2008, 02:38 PM
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I have two books on the go at present, both of them I should have finished by now as they're not exactly taxing reads. Brooker's Dawn of the Dumb and Eve Ensler's Vagina Monologues.
Both brilliant.
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maian
post Feb 20 2008, 02:45 PM
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QUOTE (Julie @ Feb 20 2008, 02:31 PM)
I just finished Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Friend by Christopher Moore, thanks to the lovely Craig.

Hands down, the funniest thing I've ever read.
*


Great book. You should check out A Dirty Job next; it's even funnier.
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Julie
post Feb 20 2008, 02:47 PM
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QUOTE (maian @ Feb 20 2008, 09:45 AM)
Great book. You should check out A Dirty Job next; it's even funnier.
*


Well, I also picked up World War Z on Craig's recommendation, but I was definately about to ask which Moore is next. I have trouble believing it will be funnier than Lamb, or near as touching (even to a hardened atheist like me, it was a very sweet story)
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maian
post Feb 20 2008, 02:48 PM
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QUOTE (Julie @ Feb 20 2008, 02:47 PM)
Well, I also picked up World War Z on Craig's recommendation, but I was definately about to ask which Moore is next.  I have trouble believing it will be funnier than Lamb, or near as touching (even to a hardened atheist like me, it was a very sweet story)
*


It's perhaps not as touching, I too found Lamb strangely affecting, but it's got much more jokes.

World War Z is all kinds of wonderful.
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maian
post Feb 21 2008, 01:26 PM
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I finished A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole last night and it was, without a doubt, one of the most consistently hilarious and entertaining books I have ever read. A wonderfully constructed farce with great characters, a wonderfully rich vision of New Orleans and written with such wit and intelligence. A staggeringly great book.
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Jubei
post Feb 21 2008, 01:35 PM
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Still working through Peace and War. I've finished Forever War, and it's direct sequel Forever Free. Not that impressed. Themes include being forced into the army, not being a natural killer, time dilation, sexuality, reliance on technology for survival, the difficulty of civilans to relate veterans. It's dealt with fairly heavy handedly in my opinion, especially heterosexual/homosexual relations. The follow up book, Forever Peace, not a sequel, is what I'm reading now. So far it seems considerably more polished while covering a lot of the same themes. Again, soldiers who do not like killing, an inability for civilians and 'jacked' veterans to relate and the resulting disassociation from society, racial tension as opposed to sexual tensions, reliance on technology and the inequlities of the technological, organisational and miltary strengths of the two opposing forces. Obviously, a lot of the authors own feelings have gone into the story, from his days as a Vietnam vet, but I think he has expressed them far better in this book. Also, the repressed homophobia of the main character in the first two books was jarring, whereas the main characters in Forever Free is a victim of racial abuse which seems to be a better way of putting amessage across while not creating a character that your supposed to like but sometimes don't. I wouldn't recommend Forever War or Forever Free, but Forever Peace is definately worth a read.

This post has been edited by Jubei: Feb 21 2008, 01:36 PM
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rabbit57i
post Feb 21 2008, 03:30 PM
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Warriors Series book one, Into The Wild by Erin Hunter

I don't tend to read young adult fantasy book series. I had heard about this series before, which is about a Clan of feral cats, and decided that I didn't want to read it. Over time though, the book covers compelled me to try it out.

It was alright. It started off slow but I figured it was an easy enough read to slog on through it. It picked up and got a bit exciting near the end but as an adult it didn't really do too much for me. I have decided that I do not like my cats anthropomorphic. Even though these cats were supposed to be "real" they still did things like having a "medicine cat" tend to their wounds. It does leave off with unfinished story lines, so I may have a go at the next book some in the future & see if they improve.
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Ade
post Feb 21 2008, 05:40 PM
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QUOTE (maian @ Feb 19 2008, 07:50 PM)
Whilst sitting in a book shop earlier drinking coffee, I started reading Steve Martin's memoir Born Standing Up having read a few good things about it. Needless to say I was hooked from the very beginning. Beautifully written, it's a hilarious and heartfelt account of his stand-up career taking in everything from his early days as a magician who told some jokes, through his megastardom and his retirement from stand-up in 1981. It's also very candid about his relationship with his family, particularly his father, and it is at times very touching. A wonderful insight into a great comedic talent.
*
Oi wahnt thaaat.

I often struggle to keep my interest in biographies, but I desperately want to read this. I've adored his wacky stand-up material for years, and still listen to his comedy albums now.


QUOTE (maian @ Feb 21 2008, 01:26 PM)
I finished A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole last night and it was, without a doubt, one of the most consistently hilarious and entertaining books I have ever read. A wonderfully constructed farce with great characters, a wonderfully rich vision of New Orleans and written with such wit and intelligence. A staggeringly great book.
*
Oi goht thaaat.

I bought it for the sole reason that it was one of Bill Hicks' favourite books, and (surprise, surprise) I've still to read it. It's a tremendous shame that the author killed himself after having tried without success to get it published. His mother later submitted it to a publisher and, well, it went on to sell pretty darn well, so I understand.

I really must get around to all these unread books of mine.
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