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> Cinemexperience: part deux., Some more filums you saw.
Serafina_Pekkala
post Aug 29 2008, 11:25 AM
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QUOTE (Sostie @ Aug 29 2008, 10:45 AM)
Extreme Prejudice

*


I have never seen this movie and I should because I like some of Walter Hill's work like Southern Comfort. And this seems up my street - pity there was no Adam Baldwin but Clancy Brown - hell-ya.

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In fact both Nolte and Boothe were pretty fine looking men back in 1987.


Indeed. But Boothe is so very ev0l looking.
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sweetbutinsane
post Aug 29 2008, 02:17 PM
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Hot Fuzz

Watched it up at the caravan. My dad didn't seem to like it all that much, but my mam loved the Peter Ian Staker bit. laugh.gif
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Kick in the Head
post Aug 29 2008, 07:10 PM
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As work requires of me, I've been watching a lot of films recently, as well as catching a few both at the cinema and at home in my own time, so here's a brief rundown of a few I've sat through...

Steep - a documentary on the history of extreme off-slope skiing featuring your typical mix of breathtaking footage and cod-mysticism from its set of gnarly talking heads. A twist for the uninitiated towards the end proves equal parts emotionally involving and a cheap rug-pulling trick, but it might look nice at the IMAX.

Tales of the Riverbank - an incredibly charming and adorable retelling of the classic children's telly show, but with the real animal cast substituted with lovely fluffy animatronics and puppetry (which looks so much better than CG). Strangely for a kids film, it's main point of reference is Apocalypse Now of all things, but with a cast list including Ardal O'Hanlon, Steve Coogan, Jim Broadbent, Stephen Fry and Peter Serafinowicz (who does about 5 characters), it's clear they intended it to be just as entertaining for adults as it is kids. And entertaining it is too.

BloodRayne 2: Deliverance - Hell must have frozen over, because I have watched a Uwe Boll film I actually sort of enjoyed. He certainly has improved as a film-maker so the searing ineptitude of House of the Dead is not present here (thank the Lord Jesus), but also nor is there an embarassing amount of slumming star names as in the first Bloodrayne. It's pretty much vampires in the Wild West and nothing else, but it's more in the laughably bad video rack than the plain bad bad, thanks to some terrible overacting and choice dialogue (last line of the film? "Life is like a penis: if it's hard, you get screwed; if it's soft, it can't be beaten"). Unfortunately, for a vampire film set almost entirely at night, you can't see a damn thing during any of the action sequences. Better luck next time with lighting guy, eh?

The Luck of Ginger Coffey - Robert Shaw stars in this little Canadian flick from Irvin Kershner (he of Laura Mars, Star Wars 2 and RoboCop 2 fame), about an ever-optimistic Irish immigrant struggling to make ends meet in Montreal. A promise of working on the local paper sees him confident his luck will change, but his wife and daughter are not convinced. It's mostly kitchen-sinky drama, but the film's dashes of humour and Shaw's ever-engaging presence sets it apart from the pack.

The Chaser - gritty Korean serial killer thriller soon to be remade by The Departed crew, that sees a detective turned pimp try and track down the man he believes is selling on the his prostitutes that are going missing. But the reality is much much worse. But what makes the film more unusual is how the killer's indentity is made known from the start - it's not so much a case of capturing him as keeping him in custody. While it's no Memories of Murder or Oldboy, its a solid debut, with some very brutal and bleak moments indeed.

Hellboy II: The Golden Army - I tried watching the first film again when it was on five the other week and just got bored halfway through. But after a dodgy start (please no Hellboy as a boy - just creepy), it proves to be a definite improvement on the first installment, if still not approaching anything more than nice-looking disposable nonsense. The best scenes are just the BPRD posse bitching, joking, getting in each other's way and so forth (particularly with new member Krauss) - so kudos for the largely made-up/voice over cast. But the action and generally plot are tired before they've even begun, and even the dialogue lacks spark (only one of Hellboy's sarcastic barbs gave me a chuckle). For a film so visually arresting, its sad to say that I'd seen it all before.

Fear[s] of the Dark - a black and white, French, animated, horror anthology is perhaps as art house as they come, but it deserves to be more of a breakout success than the over-rated Persepolis. As with any collection of short films, its a mixed bag. Out of the six featured, half are fantastic, while the other three are rather middling, but still have some incredible imagery and ideas. Unlike conventional anthologies, only half of the shorts are presented intact, with the others, more episodic in structure, edited around them. I guess it keeps the interest levels up, but I hope there's an option to watch them each all the way through on the DVD. But it'll be worth catching in the cinema, for the full darkness experience. Excellent music too.

Pineapple Express - very entertaining and surprising stoner action comedy, which is actually far less giggling in smoke and more guns, cars and explosions than I expected. It actually gets pretty violent towards the end, but delivers the jokes and action with more confidence and skill than the rather messy and unexciting climax to Hot Fuzz, say. Seth Rogen pretty much does his Seth Rogen thing, but James Franco is the absolute highlight, injecting his drug dealer character with a warmth and depth that makes him just so darn loveable. It perhaps doesn't reach some of the highs of hilarity as Superbad, but it is far more consistent, so I preferred it overall.

Blue Velvet - still trying to right the gaps in my Lynchian knowledge. And I very much liked this one, even if the plot didn't quite hold my attention as much as the atmosphere (but hey, its Lynch - narrative comes second to strangeness). Dennis Hopper is scary scary scary scary.

The Independent - I'd never heard of this, but its a little gem of a comedy worth seeking out, starring Jerry "Father of Ben" Stiller as Morty Fineman, a true independent American film-maker, in the twilight of his career spanning some 427 movies (all listed in the credits). Featuring titles such as The Foxy Chocolate Robot and Hot Buttered Fingers, his output is largely shlocky Grindhouse-style fare but often carrying an "important" message, yet he has never attained the respect he believes he deserves. Whether or not the film is meant to be as sloppily put together as one of his own works I'm not sure (the boom mike should have been credited as a regular guest appearance) and it's not sure if it's a mockumentary or a straight comedy picture, but there are some hilarious gags, the fake excerpts of his ouevre trump much of the trailers offered in the aforementioned Rodriguez/Tarantino collaboration, and there're a host of great cameos, including Ron Howard, Roger Corman, and, yes, Ben Stiller.

This post has been edited by Kick in the Head: Aug 29 2008, 07:18 PM
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GundamGuy_UK
post Aug 29 2008, 08:40 PM
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Is Hellboy 2 worth seeing if you've not seen the first one?
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maian
post Aug 29 2008, 08:45 PM
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QUOTE (GundamGuy_UK @ Aug 29 2008, 09:40 PM)
Is Hellboy 2 worth seeing if you've not seen the first one?
*


I'd say so. There's little in terms of plot connecting the two, just character relationships, and even then they're not all that difficult to pick up on.
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GundamGuy_UK
post Aug 29 2008, 08:49 PM
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Might see it tomorrow then, it turns out the cinema I'm going to isn't showing Clone Wars or Babylon AD (not my choice).
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Flame7581
post Aug 29 2008, 09:33 PM
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Not a film per se but I've been watching season 2 of Dexter with my friends.. So far I like it better then season 1 (as long as they don't turn him into a sap, which they seem to be threatening to do)
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NiteFall
post Aug 29 2008, 10:34 PM
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QUOTE (GundamGuy_UK @ Aug 29 2008, 08:49 PM)
Might see it tomorrow then, it turns out the cinema I'm going to isn't showing Clone Wars or Babylon AD (not my choice).
*


Be thankful. Clone Wars is okay, but hardly cinema-essential viewing, and Babylon AD is shit.
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GundamGuy_UK
post Aug 29 2008, 11:09 PM
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I have the choice of:

Hellboy 2
The Dark Knight (again)
Wall-E (again)
Mamma Mia!
Get Smart
You Don't Mess With The Zohan
Cars (for some reason)

I can only see one of them, or perhaps none.
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curtinparloe
post Aug 29 2008, 11:26 PM
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Hellboy 2
Slightly disappointing, but still rather good for a popcorn flick.

The Full Monty
Funnier than I remember.

Somers Town
The longest short film I've ever watched. Good for what is in effect an extended vignette. Turgoose is annoying though.
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dandan
post Aug 30 2008, 09:39 AM
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into the wild - this is a mistake...

chris mccandless (emile hirsch), having graduated from college at the top of his class, gives all his money to oxfam, cuts up his id, rids himself of worldly trappings and, without telling a single soul, sets out on the road. his dream is to make it to alsaska, which he does, to live off the land in isolation. along the way he bumps into various characters, with whom he shares his time on the road, before heading into the wild...

the film itself is based on the true story of chris mccandless; taken from jon krakauer's book, which pieces together mccandless's travels. now, being someone who is a big fan of alaska, of travelling by foot and the use of bushcraft and survival techniques, i thought that this might be right up my street. it wasn't. i think i pretty much hated it. or, at the very least, i disliked the representation of mccandless...

now, in real life, he may have been an interesting person, but this mccandless was just a bit annoying. with sean penn (director and writer of the screenplay) surrounding him with some kind of aura and turning his story into a kind of out-doors version of 'garden state' or something just as trite and pretentious. it's the kind of film which is constantly reminding you of just how profound it is. now, this may not be the case, but it just rubbed me the wrong way throughout: the book may be wonderful, but this was just bad. having a god awful soundtrack, penned and performed by eddie vedder, also didn't help...

still, there's some pretty nice cinematography and it is undeniable that america is filled with many, many beautiful wildernesses. there's also a couple of good performances to keep you watching, besides the vague interest which the narrative still manages to inspire. hirsch does a good job, although i can't say that i enjoyed watching him, as his character just got on my nerves. on the other hand, it's always great to see catherine keener on screen, and the same is true for hal holbrook.

best avoided. i'll stick with ray mears and les stroud...
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Baz
post Aug 30 2008, 11:33 AM
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Hellboy 2

Loved it.
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Ade
post Aug 30 2008, 02:39 PM
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I hereby aspire to find a job whereby I get to say this every week:

QUOTE (Kick in the Head @ Aug 29 2008, 08:10 PM)
As work requires of me, I've been watching a lot of films recently
*
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Kick in the Head
post Aug 30 2008, 05:07 PM
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QUOTE (Ade @ Aug 30 2008, 03:39 PM)
I hereby aspire to find a job whereby I get to say this every week:
*


Well 7 out of 10 of those I watched were as a direct result of the job, so it's been pretty good so far (though there are a few titles coming up I'd rather not watch - mostly straight-to-DVD amateur toture porn horror flicks).
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maian
post Aug 30 2008, 07:44 PM
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Bit of a spree today.

The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)

Clint Eastwood directs and stars as the titular outlaw, a man who joined the Confederates after Union soldiers murdered his family and, after the way, refuses to surrender.

Quite an interesting revisionist Western as it's not afraid to show the Union, and by extension the United States, in a bad light. The plot is quite loping as the characters seem to go from one event to another almost accidentally, as opposed to having a strong, central narrative, but that's okay since the script (co-written by Philip Kaufman, of Raiders of the Lost Ark and Invasion of the Body Snatchers fame) is funny and never skimps on the quotable dialogue.

Eastwood's direction shows signs of promise, but being quite early on in his career as a director it shows a few signs of teething problems, particularly during the opening 20 minutes or so which feel decidedly film-school. It does settle down, though, and ends up being an interesting and entertaining Western.

Very good.

Winchester 73 (1950)

Another Western, this time directed by Anthony Mann and starring James Stewart as man who wins the eponymous rifle in a contest, only to have it stolen off him by his life-long rival, prompting a hunt across some truly epic vistas.

A slightly unconventional film since the focus is almost solely on the rifle itself, rather than the characters, so even though Stewart is the hero, he often spends 10 or 20 minutes off-screen as seemingly less important characters get hold of the rifle and the narrative follows them for a bit. Mann's direction carries this off very well, though.

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)

The best film to feature Robert Shaw that doesn't also feature a giant shark.

Saboteur (1942)

Slightly creaky early American film from Hitchcock. By no means bad, but the overtly propagandistic bits are a bit jarring, more from their scarcity than anything else, and the plot does become increasingly contrived as things progress. Feels a bit too long but still good fun.

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