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> Cinemexperience: part deux., Some more filums you saw.
Serafina_Pekkala
post Mar 15 2010, 03:07 PM
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QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Mar 15 2010, 12:27 PM) *
This film like True Blood gives one of its vampires a civil war background. I'd quite like to see a vampire film that was just entirely set in the civil war or some other non-obvious vampire period.


Yes - put unfortunately, vampires do suffer from Anne Rice-itis. Even Whedon was prone to it. The Civil War flashback in True Blood was one of my favourite things ever on that show. It was like Vampire Deadwood (which would be fucking awesome).
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Rua
post Mar 15 2010, 03:12 PM
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I want Pre-Industrial Japan Samurai age Vampires.
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Serafina_Pekkala
post Mar 15 2010, 03:14 PM
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QUOTE (Rua @ Mar 15 2010, 03:12 PM) *
I want Pre-Industrial Japan Samurai age Vampires.


You want the moon on a stick.

They should have vampires in Heroes.
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Rua
post Mar 15 2010, 03:19 PM
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QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Mar 15 2010, 03:14 PM) *
You want the moon on a stick.


Yeah, but if I got it you'd want to come play.
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Serafina_Pekkala
post Mar 15 2010, 03:32 PM
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QUOTE (Rua @ Mar 15 2010, 03:19 PM) *
Yeah, but if I got it you'd want to come play.


Truth. I would do that.
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Everlong
post Mar 15 2010, 03:40 PM
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We've had Nazi Zombies in a few different forms of Media, now for Nazi Vampires!
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Jon 79
post Mar 15 2010, 05:45 PM
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QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Mar 15 2010, 03:14 PM) *
They should have vampires in Heroes.


They should have vampires in Doctors.
I don't watch the show (very often) but when I have the story line has been ridiculous... a bit like the plots from Sunset Beach... (another show I "rarely" watched)
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Wife Of Rolex
post Mar 15 2010, 06:15 PM
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QUOTE (logger @ Mar 15 2010, 11:53 AM) *
Human Traffic
That's not to say I thought it was good or anything, it's still full of some really terrible, terrible scenes. The film is a horrible mess and full of really juvenile humour and is a bit like talking to someone who's fried their brain. Although I did find Danny Dyer telling a taxi driver that he'd like to go all Travis Bickle on Peter Andre funny.


A lot of scenes were improvised. It's very hit and miss where it actually works, though. 'Nice one bruuvvvaaa!!' is either the funniest thing or the most cringeworthy. I err on the latter. Who thought that of all the things from the 90s that would still be around now would be Peter Andre.

I'd forgotten what a bloody strange and out there decade the 90s were. The 00s seem to have become the stumbling walk home when the music and warm fuzzy feeling has gone and the uncomfortable paranoia has set in where you start a fight for no reason and later throw up on yourself. The teenies should be where we slump into a dazed sleep and fall into a long continuous stream of dreamlike scenarios where the seemingly impossible comes true. Should be interesting.
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logger
post Mar 15 2010, 08:07 PM
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The Ninth Configuration

William Peter Blatty's directorial debut (the only other film he directed was Exorcist 3), adapted from one of his novels follows, Stacy Keach as he arrives at a US military asylum, situated in a gothic castle transported from Germany, to evaluate whether the inmates are faking or not. Full of signs and signifiers, the film is more about the relationship between science and faith and how faith can exist when surrounded by evil.

I'm not sure why I sought this film out now, but a lot of people seem to consider it an overlooked classic. I do not. It is an odd, curious film that is half surreal satire, half psychological thriller. You get the feeling it wants to be Catch 22 crossed with The Shining but it never gets anywhere near either. It's full of laboured symbolism, the concepts it wants to explore are done so in such a sophomoric fashion that it's hard to believe it has come from such an educated man. Not to mention that the whole thing is pretty dull, I nodded off for five minutes half way through. It also includes this bizarre bar room brawl.

It does have some things going for it though. It does provide a bit of a creepy atmosphere at times until you realise just what is going on. The soundtrack is one of the high points of the film with its use of jarring abstract music and constant jabber of mad men running underneath. Even some of the comedy works, the running gag of Jason Miller adapting Hamlet for dogs is pretty funny. And over all there is a strangeness to the film that is kind of appealing and you can possibly see some of its influence on the likes of John Carpenter or Terry Gilliam (or maybe Blatty was influenced by the same things as them).

If you want to see something that's a bit weird then this is ok but no matter what people say it's no classic and it's not that surprising that it was forgotten and became so obscure.
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Jon 79
post Mar 15 2010, 10:42 PM
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QUOTE (Wife Of Rolex @ Mar 15 2010, 06:15 PM) *
I'd forgotten what a bloody strange and out there decade the 90s were. The 00s seem to have become the stumbling walk home when the music and warm fuzzy feeling has gone and the uncomfortable paranoia has set in where you start a fight for no reason and later throw up on yourself. The teenies should be where we slump into a dazed sleep and fall into a long continuous stream of dreamlike scenarios where the seemingly impossible comes true. Should be interesting.

So then will the 2020s be the awakening, and realisation of what actually happened the previous 3 decades? Oh the embarrassment.
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maian
post Mar 15 2010, 10:44 PM
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How about steampunk vampires? Has anyone done that yet?

The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters

I haven't seen it in a while but it is still brilliant. If The Stand were ever to really happen, I think Billy Mitchell would be Randall Flagg.

Stuck

Stuart Gordon (director of Re-Animator, a film of which I am a big fan) brings us this harrowing tale "inspired by true events" in which a newly homeless man (Stephen Rea) is run over by a nursing home worker (Mena Suvari) and becomes lodged in her windscreen. Drunk and bewildered, Suvari drives home with Rea dangling out of the front of her car, only to discover that he is still alive. Afraid that running over someone whilst drunk and high could cost her a promotion, Suvari leaves Rea stuck in windscreen whilst she tries to think of a solution to her problem.

Stuck is part thriller, part social commentary, and it does both very well. The scenes of Rea trying to exticate himself from the car, pulling bits of glass and metal from his body, are - quite literally - visceral, delivered in a straightforward, uncomfortably realistic fashion that had me squirming in my seat very often. It helps that the film goes to great lengths to establish that Rea's character is a good guy down on his luck, and because he is so sympathetic, his situation becomes all the more horrific. Suvari is also very convincing as a woman who, in her stress- and drug-addled state, comes to believe that it is all somehow Rea's fault, that it is he who is ruining her life, and makes her decision to not help Rea, and to eventually harm him, very plausible. She is clearly the villain of the film, but she manages to avoid being a complete demon until 20 minutes from the end.

At its heart, the film is about the way in which society, both on a large and small scale, fails those who slip through the cracks. Before Rea and Suvari's worlds collide, we are shown Rea being kicked out of his apartment because, after being laid off, he can no longer pay his rent. After a confrontation with his landlord in which he only just manages to get away with his clothes and nothing else, he goes to an employment agency for a job interview. However, because a clerical error prevents the interviewer from finding Rea in the system, he sends him away to fill out a form he has already filled, to get the interview that he has already been given. Finally, whilst sleeping on a bench, a policeman tells him to leave, essentially sending him to get run over.

In each of these situations, Rea is told that he has a choice, but it's clear that he has no choice at all. Move out, or I'll call the police. It's your choice. Follow the procedures, and we'll work with you, or don't. It's your choice. You can go to the mission, or I can arrest you. It's your choice. Rea has been foresaken by those who control his life, from the company that laid him off to the authority figures who refuse to help him, and it's these forces that bring him to that fateful street.

On a smaller scale, people repeatedly fail Rea by refusing to help him because they are too obsessed with their own problems. Suvari, obviously, won't help him because she blames him for potentially ruining her career, but relatively nice characters, such as an Hispanic family who find Rea, but decide not to help for fear that the police would ask too many questions, also fail him because they don't think it's any of their concern. Nowhere is this idea more clearly demonstrated than a scene in which Suvari discovers that her drug dealer boyfriend (Russell Hashidy) has been cheating on her. Suvari becomes so angry that she completely forgets that there is a man in her garage slowly bleeding to death. It's callous to an insane degree, but it's only the most extreme example of an attitude that the film considers endemic.

The satirical aspects of the film are incredibly heavy-handed at times, and can overshadow the genuine drama of Rea trying to escape. Just after the accident happens, we see Suvari drive her car right past a group of policemen who fail to see her because they are dealing with a bum, and refuse to listen to him when he tells them to look around. The scene ends with the bum saying, "You didn't even look." Later, Hashidy and Suvari are about to have sex, and to allay Suvari's fears about her accident, Hashidy says that no one will care if she killed a bum, that anyone could get away with anything, "just look at who's in the White House." It's a throwaway line in a silly sex scene in an exploitative movie, but that very same context renders lines like that all the more clunky, especially since the film manages such a good blend of suspense and commentary elsewhere.

The film is at its best when it is focusing on Rea trying desperately to effect his escape - whether by lifting his shattered body off a windshield wiper that has pieced his side in order to reach a mobile phone, or banging his hand against the horn of the car - so the moments when it becomes more action-orientated shatter the veneer of plausibility that the film hides behind the rest of the time, but the contrivances further the intellectual thrust of the film without completely destroying the suspense and the drama.

This post has been edited by maian: Mar 15 2010, 10:54 PM
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Sostie
post Mar 16 2010, 09:55 AM
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QUOTE (maian @ Mar 15 2010, 10:44 PM) *
Stuck

Stuart Gordon (director of Re-Animator, a film of which I am a big fan) brings us this harrowing tale "inspired by true events" in which a newly homeless man (Stephen Rea) is run over by a nursing home worker (Mena Suvari) and becomes lodged in her windscreen. Drunk and bewildered, Suvari drives home with Rea dangling out of the front of her car, only to discover that he is still alive. Afraid that running over someone whilst drunk and high could cost her a promotion, Suvari leaves Rea stuck in windscreen whilst she tries to think of a solution to her problem.


This was also filmed as a plot for an episode of CSI, or a show like it.
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Sostie
post Mar 16 2010, 11:26 AM
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QUOTE (Rua @ Mar 15 2010, 03:12 PM) *
I want Pre-Industrial Japan Samurai age Vampires.


http://uk.imdb.com/title/tt0363971/


QUOTE (Everlong @ Mar 15 2010, 03:40 PM) *
We've had Nazi Zombies in a few different forms of Media, now for Nazi Vampires!


http://uk.imdb.com/title/tt0997276/
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logger
post Mar 16 2010, 12:02 PM
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QUOTE (maian @ Mar 15 2010, 10:44 PM) *
Stuck

Sounds good.
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Wife Of Rolex
post Mar 16 2010, 04:37 PM
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QUOTE (Jon 79 @ Mar 15 2010, 10:42 PM) *
So then will the 2020s be the awakening, and realisation of what actually happened the previous 3 decades? Oh the embarrassment.


For the first couple of years and then it'll shake its head and have a big detox for the rest of the decade. And swear it'll never do it again.



Until the 2040s.

This post has been edited by Wife Of Rolex: Mar 16 2010, 04:38 PM
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