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> Movie Golden-Age over?, is the golden age of the movies over?
is the golden age of the movies over?
is the golden age of the movies over?
Yes - the best films were made in the 30's and it's been downhill since then. [ 1 ] ** [5.56%]
No - i think the best films are made now, and who knows what the future holds [ 10 ] ** [55.56%]
Who Knows - do i look like i give a shit? [ 4 ] ** [22.22%]
ooh... look at all the bright colours and swirly shapes... - in case you are a neanderthal [ 3 ] ** [16.67%]
Total Votes: 18
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The Phantom
post Apr 14 2005, 10:30 AM
Post #16


Three Pinter
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QUOTE (Omniscia @ Apr 13 2005, 11:13 PM)
The golden age of the studio is over and done with, definitely. Just look at the crap they're green-lighting these days -- Are We There Yet?, The Pacifier, Alone in the Dark, Son of the Mask.
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trouble is there is a market for those sort of films. some people just aren't interested in 'film' as such, they're happy to just while away a few hours watching whatever is in front of them, and don't care if it's pushing boundaries/re-shaping genres etc... so while there's money to be made in the trash market they'll unfortunatley keep churning them out. speaking of which I hear there is a follow up to 'Saw' wacko.gif sorry personal gripe.
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spacemonkey
post Apr 14 2005, 10:33 AM
Post #17


Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhta
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They're doing the same thing to the film industry that they did to the music industry, mass produced, plasticised, commercial, crap with only about 3 storylines that they rehash over and over again
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SkipToTheEnd
post Apr 14 2005, 05:20 PM
Post #18


Young Roberts could not face another moussaka
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wahay! Which one of you is the caveman?
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Nonus Aequilibri...
post Apr 14 2005, 05:38 PM
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Better to reign in hell...
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While there's plenty of brilliant films around, I can't think of any films I like from earlier than the 70s... Just about every film I've seen from the days of black and white, or early colour, they've been utterly dreadful.
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rabbit57i
post Apr 14 2005, 06:50 PM
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QUOTE (Nonus Aequilibrium @ Apr 14 2005, 12:38 PM)
While there's plenty of brilliant films around, I can't think of any films I like from earlier than the 70s... Just about every film I've seen from the days of black and white, or early colour, they've been utterly dreadful.
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ohmy.gif

Get out there and see some films!
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Sostie
post Apr 14 2005, 06:56 PM
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"Mus" gauche, "TANG"
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QUOTE (rabbit57i @ Apr 14 2005, 06:50 PM)
ohmy.gif

Get out there and see some films!
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I'm kind of envious...he still has the joys of Hitchcock, Pressburger & Powell, It's A Wonderful Life, Night Of The Hunter, Keaton & Singin In The Rain to experience
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Ingram
post Apr 14 2005, 07:05 PM
Post #22


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Not even that far back, classics from the 60's too... Steve McQueen and Paul Newman. Get stuck in lad! Oh and don't neglect the Westerns smile.gif
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Sostie
post Apr 14 2005, 07:08 PM
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QUOTE (Ingram @ Apr 14 2005, 07:05 PM)
Not even that far back, classics from the 60's too... Steve McQueen and Paul Newman.  Get stuck in lad!  Oh and don't neglect the Westerns smile.gif
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And the best Bond films, Peter Sellers films and Carry Ons
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Ingram
post Apr 14 2005, 07:46 PM
Post #24


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Ahhhh Peter Sellers. Genius. He never found the role though. He came close with Strangelove, but never to his full potential. What a sad waste.
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Draven Grey
post Apr 14 2005, 07:57 PM
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I'm not really opposed to either era of filmmaking. I do feel that I enoyed more of the movies that came out when I was child, but that I was also of a younger age then so I'm sure my opinion was slightly less versified than it is now. The thing I think is missing with a lot of the movies that are out now is a sense that the script writers tried to present an original or solid idea. Naturally I go right for Star Wars with this one. I think that filmmakers should approch thier movies as Lucas did with A New Hope. There he had little money and relied on a good story to carry the viewers attention. The same coudl be said with more modern movies like Clerks. It had excellent writing and cost $22,769 to make.
Bottom line with a movie should be: "What's the point of the story, and why is it worth telling?"
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Sostie
post Apr 14 2005, 08:17 PM
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QUOTE (Draven Grey @ Apr 14 2005, 07:57 PM)
I'm not really opposed to either era of filmmaking. I do feel that I enoyed more of the movies that came out when I was child, but that I was also of a younger age then so I'm sure my opinion was slightly less versified than it is now. The thing I think is missing with a lot of the movies that are out now is a sense that the script writers tried to present an original or solid idea. Naturally I go right for Star Wars with this one. I think that filmmakers should approch thier movies as Lucas did with A New Hope. There he had little money and relied on a good story to carry the viewers attention. The same coudl be said with more modern movies like Clerks. It had excellent writing and cost  $22,769 to make.
Bottom line with a movie should be: "What's the point of the story, and why is it worth telling?"
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I think the success of Star Wars (originally) is more down to the design and special effects, and tapping into a well worked formula. In no way was the story individual - its a reworking of Kurowsawa's Hidden Fortress - and Lucas admits to using Joseph Campbells book "The Heros with a thousand Faces" constantly when writing the Star Wars script, using its study of universal myths to create the plot.

Lucas' inability to plot and write (and direct) a film can easily be seen in the last 2 films (Eps 1 & 2).

Having said that, I would happily call it a classic if only for the bench mark it set for design, effects and marketing. And it was a major part of one of the "Golden Ages" which saw Scorsese, Coppola, Spielberg, Carpenter etc at their peak.
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Omniscia
post Apr 14 2005, 08:35 PM
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QUOTE (Nonus Aequilibrium @ Apr 14 2005, 01:38 PM)
While there's plenty of brilliant films around, I can't think of any films I like from earlier than the 70s... Just about every film I've seen from the days of black and white, or early colour, they've been utterly dreadful.
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Get thee to a video store and rent the collective oeuvres of Hitchcock, Kubrick (especially Dr. Strangelove), Orson Welles, John Ford, David Lean, Elia Kazan, Billy Wilder, etc, etc, etc.
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Douglas Nicol
post Apr 14 2005, 09:02 PM
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QUOTE (Sostie @ Apr 14 2005, 08:17 PM)
I think the success of Star Wars (originally) is more down to the design and special effects, and tapping into a well worked formula.  In no way was the story individual - its a reworking of Kurowsawa's Hidden Fortress - and Lucas admits to using Joseph Campbells book "The Heros with a thousand Faces" constantly when writing the Star Wars script, using its study of universal myths to create the plot.

Lucas' inability to plot and write (and direct) a film can easily be seen in the last 2 films (Eps 1 & 2).

Having said that, I would happily call it a classic if only for the bench mark it set for design, effects and marketing.  And it was a major part of one of the "Golden Ages" which saw Scorsese, Coppola, Spielberg, Carpenter etc at their peak.
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And the ironic thing about that is that Lucas post Star Wars, sued people for plagiarism. huh.gif

The whole Death Star Trench Run was lifted from 633 Squadron.
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Sostie
post Apr 14 2005, 09:06 PM
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QUOTE (Douglas Nicol @ Apr 14 2005, 09:02 PM)
And the ironic thing about that is that Lucas post Star Wars, sued people for plagiarism.  huh.gif

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He tried to stop Battlestar Galactica!!!!
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superfurryandy
post Apr 14 2005, 10:52 PM
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QUOTE (Omniscia @ Apr 14 2005, 09:35 PM)
Get thee to a video store and rent the collective oeuvres
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Eggs?
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