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Sostie
Just picked up...

Dawn Of The Dumb - Charlie Brooker
The Joke's Over - Ralph Steadman
What Happens Now - Jeremy Dyson
I Predict A Riot - Colin Bateman
I Never Knew That About London- Christopher Winn


Colin Bateman seems seems to have been re-branded as just "Bateman". His christian name seems to have been erased from the book. Hope the book's quality doesn't reflect the wankiness of the name change.
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Sostie @ Oct 31 2007, 07:50 AM)
Nature Girl by Carl Hiassen
Hiassen by numbers - a female lead, a villain whose luck just gets worse and worse, eccentrics & nutters, all set in Florida.  As entertaining, engrossing and informative as usual.
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This is very good. Have you read Skinny Dip?
Sostie
QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Nov 1 2007, 11:31 PM)
This is very good.  Have you read Skinny Dip?
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Indeed. I think I'm up to date now. Started many years ago with Stormy Weather, then went back to the beginning and have ploughed through them all. He never let's me down. Even Striptease was marvellous despite reading it after the movie's bad press.
Atara
Confessor is out soon. I am in the process of re-reading all the other books in the series before it does since it was over 5 years ago when I first started reading them
GundamGuy_UK
Make Your Own Damn Movie by Lloyd Kaufman. And look:

Hee hee....
NiteFall
Does that say "Toxie loves networking" or is it just me?
GundamGuy_UK
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Nov 5 2007, 12:49 AM)
Does that say "Toxie loves networking" or is it just me?
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I don't actually know what it is, and I was too embarrassed to ask. So it remains a mystery.

My friends think it says "returning". I don't think it's networking, there's no "k"
rabbit57i
It looks like "returning". I had something similar happen in to me when Mark Gatiss signed a book for me with what looked like "To Michele, no-tail?" Is he questioning my gender?
mcraigclark
Augusten Burroughs once signed a book to me with " Dear Craig, Thanks for showing me your penis. XX"
melzilla
Some people will do anything for an autograph.
curtinparloe
QUOTE (melzilla @ Nov 6 2007, 12:19 AM)
Some people will do anything for an autograph.
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It's true. My autograph of Toyah is at the bottom of the court injunction.
mcraigclark
I should clarify.

There was no revealing of bits to Augusten Burroughs that night. Really.
Zoe
Hilarious review for Boris Johnson's book of poetry

QUOTE
You might well think I am being unfair and that, like Gordon Brown's loathing for David Cameron, there is an element of class hatred behind my bile. You got the second part right. I refuse to be charmed by this gaffe-prone berk (he lost his wedding ring within an hour of getting married), this inventor of quotations (for which he was fired from the Times), this witless calumniser of scousers, witless calumniser of Papua New Guineans, this bad novelist, this brazenly buffoonish poetic dabbler. It is important, as Byron recognised when he wrote English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (now that was a vibrant piece of satirical verse), that we castigate rubbish: "Degenerate Britons! Are ye dead to shame,/ Or, kind to dulness, do you fear to blame?" We deserve better than Johnson, certainly better than Johnson the oompa loompa, pouring his chocolatey goo into our Christmas stockings.
Sostie
Charlie Brooker's Dawn Of The Dumb

Because I am too forgetful/lazy to actually read Brooker's columns in the Guardian/online, this was a welcome discovery. A collection of pieces from 2004 to this Summer, a really enjoyable work journey read of criticism, bile and observation. Though, whilst I seemed to agree with most of what he said, I'm not too sure about his anti-flat cap stance.
sofa
QUOTE (Jessopjessopjessop @ Sep 6 2006, 10:11 AM)
How did you manage that?

This week I started reading Iain Bank's The Wasp Factory. I'm loving it so far.
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Mr Banks is my favorate author, and that is one of the greatest books ever written. Have read all his books and they are consistantly excellent
Jubei
I've spent the last couple of weeks re-reading my way through the Iain M Banks bibliography. So far read Consider Phlebas, The Player of Games, Use of Weapons and Against a Dark Background. Now on Feersum Endjinn.

Against a Dark Background is an excellent, if unusually bleak, story.
sofa
Read all Banks Sci-fi but get lost in the opera stuff, excession, The Algebrast tsc
Dark background is the best of the lot, claustrophobic compared to most Sci-Fi. I managed to stay with the story.
ipse dixit
Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together

All kinds of awesome.
Jimmay
QUOTE (ipse dixit @ Nov 16 2007, 04:19 PM)
Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together

All kinds of awesome.
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Can't wait to pick up a copy of that.

I read Stardust yesterday, and just in time to still catch it at the cinema. It was most enjoyable although a large number of things were skipped over quite a lot leaving a lot of quite glaring gaps in the story. The epilogue/letter from Gaiman does allude to further books filling in the gaps but I'm not too sure if it works that well here. The fellowship of the castle for example, which is mentioned a few times but never elaborated on makes the book seem unfinished in some way.

However, over all, as a quick read, I really enjoyed it and the characterisation as always was fantastic.
maian
Finished This Book Will Save Your Life and it was really rather superb. Well-written, great characters and hugely entertaining.

Then, realising I had nothing to read on the train back, I popped into Waterstones and picked up A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore and have not been able tp put it down. The first half has been by turns hilarious, exciting and oddly affecting. Moore's fast becoming a favourite author.
sweetbutinsane
I just bought His Dark Materials - all three books in one (enormous) volume. It's so pretty! I'm trying to read Northern Lights quickly to refresh my mind of the story before the film comes out. I'm only a couple of chapters in so far.
mcraigclark
QUOTE (maian @ Nov 18 2007, 02:34 PM)
...I popped into Waterstones and picked up A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore and have not been able tp put it down. The first half has been by turns hilarious, exciting and oddly affecting. Moore's fast becoming a favourite author.
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Kitty! wink.gif
thirtyhelens
A wonderful, wonderful book. Craig never steers me wrong.



... like bear!
Raven
QUOTE (Sostie @ Nov 14 2007, 08:41 PM)
Charlie Brooker's Dawn Of The Dumb

Because I am too forgetful/lazy to actually read Brooker's columns in the Guardian/online, this was a welcome discovery.  A collection of pieces from 2004 to this Summer, a really enjoyable work journey read of criticism, bile and observation.  Though, whilst I seemed to agree with most of what he said, I'm not too sure about his anti-flat cap stance.
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I nearly picked that up the other day, it's worth it for his second review of Torchwood alone!

QUOTE (Jubei @ Nov 15 2007, 09:42 AM)
I've spent the last couple of weeks re-reading my way through the Iain M Banks bibliography.  So far read Consider Phlebas, The Player of Games, Use of Weapons and Against a Dark Background.  Now on Feersum Endjinn.

Against a Dark Background is an excellent, if unusually bleak, story.
*


I really must finish Consider Phlebas, I put it down to read Harry Potter in the summer and never picked it up again (I'm between books at the moment though so I really should go back and finish it).

The Player of Games is my favourite, but I really should have another stab at Excession as I remember that being pretty good as well.

I've just finished re-reading The Day of the Triffids for the nth time.
maian
QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Nov 20 2007, 12:30 AM)
Kitty!  wink.gif
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Get the hell away from me!
GundamGuy_UK
QUOTE (sweetbutinsane @ Nov 19 2007, 08:06 PM)
I just bought His Dark Materials - all three books in one (enormous) volume. It's so pretty! I'm trying to read Northern Lights quickly to refresh my mind of the story before the film comes out. I'm only a couple of chapters in so far.
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I read them a few months ago and loved them. Great stuff.
Downsy
As part of my 'fat and stupid is no way to go through life' regime, I've been using my wasted hours of my daily commute along the M25 to listen to audio books. I've just finished listening to The Time Machine by HG Wells and it was pretty cool, as a bit of a science geek I really enjoyed some of the questions it posed and Wells' ability to conjour up pictures is wonderful. On the downside, the ending seemed a bit rushed and seemed to throw in some bonkers pieces to try to save it. The final scene was a little predfictable though.
maian
Finished A Dirty Job and it was really wonderful. Great from start to finish and Christopher Moore carried the whole thing off with wit, depth and empathy. The way in which the book dealt with death, not only the big D version but the concept and the effects of it, was surprisingly touching and, as someone who's had to go through all that recently, painfully accurate. Brilliant brilliant brilliant.

After all the discussion about it last week I've now gone on to The Shining again, having previously started reading it about two years ago.
Downsy
QUOTE (maian @ Nov 21 2007, 10:49 PM)
After all the discussion about it last week I've now gone on to The Shining again, having previously started reading it about two years ago.
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You won't be disappointed*



*I will not be held responsable for you being disappointed
maian
QUOTE (Downsy @ Nov 21 2007, 11:00 PM)
*I will not be held responsable for you being disappointed
*


Great, and I drew up this liability lawsuit for nothing.

*Tears up sheets of paper*

The lawyers will be heartbroken.
Zoe
I'm not scared yet (slowed a bit due to various reasons but up to about page 350), even when reading it in bed - which I'll do some more of in a bit.

I think I've gone past the point where films and books scare me, which is a shame.

It's still bloody marvellous and a far more fascinating character study than I expected. I am totally involved in this family.

It also sparked an amusing conversation between me and my Mum about how long it would take my Dad to try and kill us if we were snowed in without booze as a family... we reckon about two days. Imagine 'The Shining' but with Bobby De Niro in the Nicholson role.

"All work and no Stella Artois makes Steve a grumpy Daddy"
maian
I'm quite interested to see what my reaction to the book will be because, as I think I've mentioned here before, I've never been scared by a book. Actually, that's not true; some of Roald Dahl's stuff used to scare the hell out of me when I was a kid but certainly nothing I've read as an adult has genuinely scared me. From what I remember of my first attempt to read The Shining I was quite creeped out but not scared. Then again, I only got about a third or so in so we'll see how things go this time.
Sostie
Currently reading I Predict A Riot by Colin Bateman. As with most of his books, a very entertaining read. But two things really annoy me about it.

Firstly, as mentioned earlier in the thread, he has dropped the "Colin" and is now known only as "Bateman". How wanky.

Secondly, there is no swearing! Instead we have f***ing, b***ard and cr*p!
I've never seen this before in a novel, and cannot, for the life of me, understand why it's happened.
sweetbutinsane
QUOTE (GundamGuy_UK @ Nov 20 2007, 10:27 PM)
I read them a few months ago and loved them. Great stuff.
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I've only read them the once, and I'm fairly certain it was a while ago as I've forgotten a surprising amount of details from the first book. On the plus side, it makes it feel like I'm reading them for the first time again, which is nice. smile.gif
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Sostie @ Nov 22 2007, 06:13 AM)
Currently reading I Predict A Riot by Colin Bateman. As with most of his books, a very entertaining read.  But two things really annoy me about it.

Firstly, as mentioned earlier in the thread, he has dropped the "Colin" and is now known only as "Bateman".  How wanky.

Secondly, there is no swearing!  Instead we have f***ing, b***ard and cr*p!
I've never seen this before in a novel, and cannot, for the life of me, understand why it's happened.
*


It was originally in serial form in a family newspaper in Northern Ireland.
Jubei
QUOTE (Raven @ Nov 20 2007, 09:23 AM)
I really must finish Consider Phlebas, I put it down to read Harry Potter in the summer and never picked it up again (I'm between books at the moment though so I really should go back and finish it).

The Player of Games is my favourite, but I really should have another stab at Excession as I remember that being pretty good as well.
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I've finished Feersum Endjinn again, I do enjoy that book, although it's quite short. Bascule is such a likeable character, and the whole future earth is so different from so many other imaginings. I'm just starting Look to Windward now, back to the culture again, but I'm starting to find it slow going. Also, I don't appear to have Excession on my shelf. It's the one I really want to read again, based on the synopsis I read, but now I'm wondering if I've ever read it. I'm about 90% certain I have, but I might have to buy it a second time. So annoying when that happens. Also, don;t know if this was mentioned here, but Banks is working on a new Culture novel, I think called Matter, due out next year.
Chapman Baxter
QUOTE (Jubei @ Nov 23 2007, 09:07 AM)
the whole future earth is so different from so many other imaginings.
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Future earth? It's been a while since I read it, but isn't the whole thing set on a spaceship?
Jubei
QUOTE (Chapman Baxter @ Nov 23 2007, 09:38 AM)
Future earth? It's been a while since I read it, but isn't the whole thing set on a spaceship?
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Feersum Endjinn? Nope. Unless I really missed something. It's set on a far future earth. Most humans left in the Diaspora, leaving a few behind who pretty much renounced technology and AIs. A quasi-religous fuedal hierarchy evolves, although technology is still very much present. The 'Crypt' or Cryptosphere is the remnants of the earths datasphere, now inhabited largely by the Chaos, reveled as evolved AI near the end. Most people live in the Serahfa Fastness, a massive massive scale castle built originally as the anchor point for one of three Space Elevators, long since dismantled. The 'Feersum Endjinn' appears to be some method of moving Earth and the rest of the Solar System out of the way of the 'Encroachment', possibly a cloud of stellar dust blocking out the sun and destroying the solar system.
Raven
I found Look to Windward to be incredibly bleak, and as such a hard read. Looking back, I probably need to read the book again, but it was just so depressing I'm not sure I want to.

I picked up Charlie Brooker's Dawn Of The Dumb and Terry P's Wintersmith this evening.
neilo
I'm a big Queen and Brian May fan, so Llama bought me Laura Jackson's 'Brian May: The Definitive Biography'! I loved it. It's full of contributions from different musicians, friends and astronomers close to Brian. It's quite a detailed biography which focuses around Brian's choice of leaving astronomy behind to focus on music when he was so close to getting his PHD in Astronomy (Which he completed this year after 30 years!), the building of his 'Red Special' Guitar with his dad, Harold, building Queen and his depression relating to the death of Freddie Mercury. It's a ruddy good book and leaves no stone unturned.

Interestingly, I think I've actually only read Biographies and Autobiographies this year!! I also read Freddie's Biography by Peter Freestone, which is extremely sad and very detailed but a really good read. During the summer I read Rik Mayall's book 'Bigger Than Hitler, Better Than Christ', which is also hilarious if you're into 'The Rik Mayall'.
Jubei
QUOTE (Raven @ Nov 24 2007, 01:00 AM)
I found Look to Windward to be incredibly bleak, and as such a hard read.  Looking back, I probably need to read the book again, but it was just so depressing I'm not sure I want to.
*

I'm a good chunk in to it, and it is quite depressing. Quilan/Huyler has a quite unflinching attitude at this point, Ziller is a bit of a prick, Masaq Hub is generally quite morose and Kabe is a nice guy but so far quite boring. Maybe it'll pick up.

Also, I met Brian May once, he came to my school and did a charity thing.
curtinparloe
Sorry, this made me guffaw:

QUOTE (neilo @ Nov 24 2007, 01:19 AM)
I'm a big Queen and Brian May fan, so Llama bought me Laura Jackson's 'Brian May: The Definitive Biography'!
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laugh.gif
rabbit57i
The Life & Opinions of Tristram Shandy
neilo
QUOTE (curtinparloe @ Nov 24 2007, 12:10 PM)
Sorry, this made me guffaw:
laugh.gif
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...Clever boy... tongue.gif Perhaps I should have altered my positioning of those few words. Dear me.
Peronel
I've just finished Sense and Sensibility. I really enjoyed it, and couldn't remember much of the story from seeing the movie years ago, so all the betrayals and backstabbings were nice little surprises.

Not sure what I'll read now, I have a large TBR pile, but none are taking my fancy.
maian
Since I couldn't sleep last night I was able to finish The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick and I really loved it. I wasn't sure what the book actually was about initially but by the end I realised it was a unique and beautiful tribute to cinema. The use of illustrations and film stills throughout the novel lends it a sense of pace and purpose that I've rarely encountered in a novel. One particular chase scene, told solely through illustrations, was breathtakingly tense.

A thrilling and wonderful book for anyone who really loves cinema.
mcraigclark
QUOTE (maian @ Nov 25 2007, 07:59 AM)
Since I couldn't sleep last night I was able to finish The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick and I really loved it. I wasn't sure what the book actually was about initially but by the end I realised it was a unique and beautiful tribute to cinema. The use of illustrations and film stills throughout the novel lends it a sense of pace and purpose that I've rarely encountered in a novel. One particular chase scene, told solely through illustrations, was breathtakingly tense.

A thrilling and wonderful book for anyone who really loves cinema.
*

You might as well be browsing my bookshelves.
maian
What, are you suggesting I have a secret camera hidden away somewhere that watches your bookshelf so that I can know what books to read? That's just silly.
curtinparloe
QUOTE (neilo @ Nov 24 2007, 11:33 PM)
...Clever boy... tongue.gif Perhaps I should have altered my positioning of those few words. Dear me.
*


I would have been hoping you typoed Brian in that case, so it said "I am a big brain"
Llama
QUOTE (curtinparloe @ Nov 26 2007, 12:11 AM)
I would have been hoping you typoed Brian in that case, so it said "I am a big brain"
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If you look really closely you'll notice he actually is.
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