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m0r1arty
Well even as I put down my copy of Children of God I can't help but feel betrayed.

I'm gonna get back into my Terry Pratchett collection and enjoy some Discworld logic.

The Colour of Magic here I come!

-m0r
beatoswald
I'm reading a biography of Robert Mitchum called 'Baby, I Don't Care' by Lee Server. I'm enjoying it. Mitchum was an interesting guy and the book is full of colourful and funny stories.
tigerlily
I'm currently nearing the end of The Novice, the second in the Black Magician trilogy, and I'm enjoying it very much. Thanks muchly to those who recommended it.

I've also just started reading Artemis Fowl for my teaching course. Apparently, to become an English teacher you have to read a lot of books, specifically those aimed at children. So I've got a whole load of Phillip Pulman, Anne Rice and Anthony Horowitz to look forward to. Hurrah! I've also read a load of critical theory on children's literature which has been really very interesting and eye opening.
m0r1arty
Is Anne Rice established in the cirles-that-know-things?

I thought her books (after Interview) were tripe. Enjoyable, but tripe.

-m0r
luvmusic
House of Sleep - Jonathon Coe

Very, very good.
tigerlily
QUOTE (m0r1arty @ Sep 1 2006, 04:48 PM)
Is Anne Rice established in the cirles-that-know-things?

I thought her books (after Interview) were tripe. Enjoyable, but tripe.

-m0r
*


Sorry, I mean Anne Fine. Flour Babies and that kind of thing.

I'm very, very tired. sad.gif
mcraigclark
I'm most of the way through Horsemen of the Esophagus. It's about competitive eating contests and the people who participate in them. On the surface you might see it as a book about gluttony, but there's a lot more to it. I've enjoyed it so far, even though it has made me gag a little.
Crutch
Saul Kripke "Naming and Necessity." Serious philosophy that is fun to read. Kripke is the shit.
Julie
Just finished another of Douglas Coupland's - All Families are Psychotic. I love that man's writing.
Jubei
QUOTE (tigerlily @ Sep 1 2006, 04:37 PM)
I'm currently nearing the end of The Novice, the second in the Black Magician trilogy, and I'm enjoying it very much.  Thanks muchly to those who recommended it.

...  So I've got a whole load of Phillip Pulman, Anne Rice and Anthony Horowitz to look forward to.  Hurrah! 

Well done, glad you're enjoying it. It's a fun not too complicated book with likeable goodies, detestable baddies, and a few slight twists in its tail (or tale - ah ha ha)

Also, I'm about to start reading Northern Lights by Philip Pullman. Bought it by accident but I'm still quite looking forward to it. Starting that today.

And, finished Ilium and Olympos now. An excellent read, very interesting, although I thought the tone of the ending was a touch depressing. The fact that after all humanity has been through, after all it's learned, it reverts back to a state not much more advanced than today. In the final chapter, 7 years after the fall of Ilium, bueatiful Ardis Hall has grown a town of its own, complete with sleazy bars and brothels. The Greeks and the Jews don't always get along. And Caliban is still loose out there somewhere. Not the happy ending I was hoping for, put perhaps the more poignant for it.
tigerlily
I've finished the whole trilogy now as I read the High Lord in a couple of days. Really, really enjoyed it.

Hope you enjoy His Dark Materials. It was getting into that trilogy that made me pick up The Magician's Guild in the first place, I'd never really read much of that ilk before.

I've just picked up my resertations from the library - Bumface by Morris Gleitzman and Clockwork by Pullman. Unfortunately I seem to have accidentally reserved the Taiwanese copy of Clockface. I didn't want to say anything when the librarian was stamping it - "what's all that funny writing?" I now believe that he's left with the impression that I'm fluent in the language.

I'm not. Bums. 60p that's cost me.
Zoe
QUOTE (luvmusic @ Sep 1 2006, 04:52 PM)
House of Sleep - Jonathon Coe

Very, very good.
*


Very, very, very good.

Coe and McEwan are our greatest living writers.
luvmusic
I dunno about McEwan, I always start his books enthusiastically but then lose interest about half way through...
Jessopjessopjessop
QUOTE (Jubei @ Sep 5 2006, 09:38 AM)
Also, I'm about to start reading Northern Lights by Philip Pullman.  Bought it by accident
*

How did you manage that?

This week I started reading Iain Bank's The Wasp Factory. I'm loving it so far.
Zoe
QUOTE (luvmusic @ Sep 5 2006, 06:40 PM)
I dunno about McEwan, I always start his books enthusiastically but then lose interest about half way through...
*


Different stokes, I think he's a complete genius. Every novel is so rich and full of meaning, I'm never less than utterly compelled.

As for Coe I prefer him when he's in satirical mode and he's one of the few writers who can successfully blend the traditions of novels and satires - which is pretty much perfect reading as far as I'm concerned.

QUOTE (Jessopjessopjessop @ Sep 6 2006, 10:11 AM)
How did you manage that?

This week I started reading Iain Bank's The Wasp Factory. I'm loving it so far.
*


Better not tell you the ending then...

Ho ho ho.
thirtyhelens
Note to self: Buy Keith Olbermann's book this weekend.
maian
Finished Jasper Fforde's Lost In A Good Book and I can't wait to see what happens to Thursday Next, er, well, next. Easily one of the most brilliant writers around today for the sheer wealth of ideas he manages to fit into his books whilst still having plots that are so tight and interesting. Although, as a result of reading this book I am now deathly afraid of coincidences.
widowspider
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 12 2006, 01:41 PM)
Finished Jasper Fforde's Lost In A Good Book and I can't wait to see what happens to Thursday Next, er, well, next. Easily one of the most brilliant writers around today for the sheer wealth of ideas he manages to fit into his books whilst still having plots that are so tight and interesting. Although, as a result of reading this book I am now deathly afraid of coincidences.
*

laugh.gif
luvmusic
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 12 2006, 12:41 PM)
Finished Jasper Fforde's Lost In A Good Book and I can't wait to see what happens to Thursday Next, er, well, next. Easily one of the most brilliant writers around today for the sheer wealth of ideas he manages to fit into his books whilst still having plots that are so tight and interesting. Although, as a result of reading this book I am now deathly afraid of coincidences.
*

So am I! What a coincid... arggghhhhhhh!

Reading Joseph O'Connor's 'Desperadoes' - good, but no match for his 'The Salesman' and 'The Star of the Sea'.
gulfcoast_highwayman
'Firefly - The Official Companion : Volume One' arrived today. Iy's very comprehensive.

Full scripts for episodes up to and including 'Our Mrs Reynolds' (the reminaing 8 eps will be in volume 2) and lots of lovely pictures fo the prettiest cast ever put on TV (or film, for that matter).
ipse dixit
Hee hee! I still need to nick me sen a copy. They're lined up on the shelf right there....Gah.
Jessopjessopjessop
The Wasp Factory Iain Banks

For years I've intended reading this, intrigued by peoples' descriptions of it being sick, twisted and gruesome. But it wasn't what I expected and is so much stronger for it.

From the very start we are immersed the world of Frank Cauldhame, a disturbed teenager living a secretive life on a remote Scottish island. Frank is totally sociopathic, and dedicates his days to killing animals with ritualistic significance. Every small part of his existence is given strange totemic value; places are named with almost spiritual reverence and important events in the past remembered and respected.

But as bizarre as this all seems, and how unlike our own childhoods his experiences, Frank is totally sympathetic as a character. His self-generated myths and beliefs are completely convincing through the twisted logic we hear in the first-person narrative, and the use of very black humour - with some violence verging on slapstick - further charms us. Depsite his casual acts of cruelty, we empathise with his unorthodox upbringing perhaps because of the isolation we all have felt at times, and because Frank believes what his is doing is right so fervently.

My only criticism would be the climax. An inevitable endgame takes place which seems a little too spectacular, undermining the carefully controlled build-up. Through this we come to learn a surprising truth about Frank and his past, but ultimately I found this not to have any relevance; I am left wondering what we are supposed to conclude about this revelation, if anything.

Although I feel a little behind everyone having only read it now, this is certainly one of the most involving, intriguing and original books I have ever read.
widowspider
QUOTE (ipse dixit @ Sep 14 2006, 09:47 AM)
Hee hee! I still need to nick me sen a copy. They're lined up on the shelf right there....Gah.
*

Steal me a copy, will ya?
ipse dixit
QUOTE (widowspider @ Sep 14 2006, 03:31 PM)
Steal me a copy, will ya?
*

I'm too afraid.


ed. Perdido Street Station update - I have about 200 pages left. It's been very easy reading and quite enjoyable, but I've lost patience with a couple of the creature desciption things (how creepy-fanboy are the khepri? And I couldn't be bothered with the whole handlinger thing) and the lengthiness does give the impression that no-one bothered editing it. As for the slake-moths, I'm essentially envisaging them as Venom - eyes + wings.
Jessopjessopjessop
QUOTE (ipse dixit @ Sep 14 2006, 03:34 PM)
I'm too afraid.
*

How about me?
Jubei
I've just finished The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman, part 2 in His Dark Materials. Just the Amber Spyglass to go. Really enjoyed it. I so didn't get the connection with Jonpari - if I'd just said it out loud, duh! I was guessing he was Sir Charles. Never mind. Anyway, looking forward to seeing where this will go. So far Mr Pullman seems to be taking quite a stab at the church, i wonder whether he'll follow it through, or whether he'll quail at insulting the church and make them out to be misled goodguys in the end. We'll see.
Crutch
Haunted by C.P. It was okay but nothing special, even if some stories were really good. His non-ficiton shorts are overall better.

Now reading: Ask the Dust by John Fante. Good shit.
sweetbutinsane
QUOTE (Jubei @ Sep 14 2006, 03:42 PM)
I've just finished The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman, part 2 in His Dark Materials.  Just the Amber Spyglass to go.  Really enjoyed it.  I so didn't get the connection with Jonpari - if I'd just said it out loud, duh!  I was guessing he was Sir Charles.  Never mind.  Anyway, looking forward to seeing where this will go.  So far Mr Pullman seems to be taking quite a stab at the church, i wonder whether he'll follow it through, or whether he'll quail at insulting the church and make them out to be misled goodguys in the end.  We'll see.
*


I do love those books. I wasn't too sure at first, but I did stick with them and I'm glad I did. The last one is my favourite.

I've just started reading The Magician's Nephew, which is the first book in The Chronicles of Narnia for those who didn't know. I have a huge book with all seven stories in which I've had for a few years and have never read properly, so I figured I'd better start reading them now.
Ghost_862
Has anybody read Kingdom Of Fear by Hunter S Thompson?

I saw it in a shop today for the first time ever but didn't know whether it was worth buying.
widowspider
No, sorry.

I'm currently ploughing through The Queen's Fool by Phillippa Gregory. I really enjoyed The Other Boleyn Girl by the same author, as very few writers tackle the Renaissance/Elizabethan age in historical fiction, and she does it brilliantly. There's lots of politics and a different look at many famous historical figures like Henry VIII, Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth.
Starscream`s Ghost
Black & Blue

Yet another Rebus book to add to my collection. I can't help it. Especially as I see Stott in my mind's eye. John Hannah was never Rebus to me.
mcraigclark
I re-read World War Z. I'd only read the advanced copy and wanted to make sure nothing was missed. It's a great book; full of zombies and regular folks who got put through the wringer in order to survive. You don't have to be a horror genre fan to really like it, either.
Crutch
I'm planning to read something by Camus, again. Any recs?
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Crutch @ Sep 28 2006, 11:49 AM)
I'm planning to read something by Camus, again. Any recs?
*

The Stranger, or Resistance, Rebellion and Death.
maian
Finished The Well Of Lost Plots the other day and Fforde gets better and better. I may have to re-read the Big Over Easy now as the way it links in with WOLP is ingenious and adds a whole new layer to the NurseryCrimes series.

Just started Jane Eyre so that I will finally work out what The Eyre Affair is on about half the time.
Crutch
QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Sep 29 2006, 12:32 AM)
The Stranger, or Resistance, Rebellion and Death.
*


Already read the first one and loved it. I have to check out the German title of the second and fanks, man!
sweetbutinsane
Just finished To Kill A Mockingbird again (I've already read it before, but we had to make notes about it for English Literature). I'm actually pretty glad our teacher chose for us to do this book (the other two choices were Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, neither of which I thought were any good) - I really like it.
Crutch
Since I haven't got yet any Camus, I'm going with the latest Bret Easton Ellis, 'coz it's rotting in my shelf for about a year or what and I haven't read it yet. Of course the thing is very promising but I wonder how much Ellis can make "himself" into something different than his usual narrators. Anyway. Bret Easton Ellis is one of my gods.
Sean of the Dead
Today I bought "Yes Man" by Danny Wallace, and I'm looking forward to reading it muchly.
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Crutch @ Sep 29 2006, 08:15 PM)
Since I haven't got yet any Camus, I'm going with the latest Bret Easton Ellis, 'coz it's rotting in my shelf for about a year or what and I haven't read it yet. Of course the thing is very promising  but I wonder how much Ellis can make "himself" into something different than his usual narrators. Anyway. Bret Easton Ellis is one of my gods.
*

Are you talking about Lunar Park?
Crutch
QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Oct 1 2006, 07:17 PM)
Are you talking about Lunar Park?
*


Of course I am. I forgot to name it yeah. I read twenty pages or so and it's good. Every Ellis books except for Less Than Zero and The Informers took me some while before I really could dig it. But after that I loved them all. I know, he's always writing about the same boring drugs, sex and coldhearted people themes, but he does it with a so different stile in all of his books, it really keeps me interested. Even if every twist he pulls is forced, it just fits into the crazed world he's creating in his work.
mcraigclark
Well, I don't think you'll be disappointed by Lunar Park then. American Psycho is pretty much a character in it. I was a little turned off by the ostensibly autobiographical aspects of the story, but I liked it overall.
Crutch
QUOTE (mcraigclark @ Oct 1 2006, 07:35 PM)
ostensibly autobiographical aspects of the story, but I liked it overall.
*


Well, it's the premise of the novel, right? How eversything he archieved in life (especially AmPsy) is haunting him. And I always love it when an author merges his real life with his fiction to see, how far the people will follow him.
gulfcoast_highwayman
Al Franken's ;The Truth With jokes'.

It is a good read but makes me so angry at what the right wing nut jobs in charge of the world are up to, I haveto stop reading it occasionally to calm down.
Stella MM
I'm probably the last person in the country to do so, but I've literally just finished reading The Time Traveller's Wife. I thought it was beautiful and skilfully written. I haven't read characters as touchingly and truthfully written as Henry, Clare and Gomez for a long time, probably not since Donna Tartt's The Secret History. I'm slightly embarrassed by how much I cried at the end, though.
MissingPlanet
The Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster. It's typical Auster - full of coincidences and lost souls. The best thing he's written since Leviathan.
Crutch
I'm halfway through Lunar Park and it really creeps me out. I love it. And I've never seen, how you can make something as small as some vodka make into something so sad with so little words.

Afterwards I won't get straight to Camus, but reading Sartre's "La nausée" first.
widowspider
QUOTE (Stella MM @ Oct 7 2006, 07:59 AM)
I'm probably the last person in the country to do so, but I've literally just finished reading The Time Traveller's Wife. I thought it was beautiful and skilfully written. I haven't read characters as touchingly and truthfully written as Henry, Clare and Gomez for a long time, probably not since Donna Tartt's The Secret History. I'm slightly embarrassed by how much I cried at the end, though.
*

I cried a lot at the end of it as well. Like you say, such honestly written characters and a beautiful story that didn't get confusing despite all the jumping around.
Crutch
I've some more of Lunar Park and it is the first novel since The Shining (which I read about ten years ago) that honestly frightens me. I think, I have some serious fatherhood problems. I should put the book in the freezer.
theevilresident101
48 Shades of Brown by Nick Earls.

It's a movie here now so novel first+movie viewing=comparison.
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