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Sostie
So far, really enjoying Secret Invasion. Captain Britain is becoming a bit of a guilty pleasure at the moment as well.
NiteFall
So, do you reckon that Tony Stark is really a Skrull? Or was Skrull-Spider-Woman messing with him and trying to drive him nuts?
Sostie
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Jul 14 2008, 02:42 PM)
So, do you reckon that Tony Stark is really a Skrull? Or was Skrull-Spider-Woman messing with him and trying to drive him nuts?
*


I think I'll go fo the latter.
empathy-with-beast
In the process of my girlfriend moving into my house we unearthed some Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics circa 1989 (her dad did the animatronics in the turtles' faces in the films). Now I was dimly aware that the Turtles had been an underground comic that had somewhat inexplicably become this mainstream children's program but, apart from the roleplaying game, I'd never encountered anything to do with the comics. I have to say I was impressed. The artwork has a nice grungy feel to it, it's suprisingly violent (no robot foot soldiers here, just men being killed with martial arts weapons) and it captures a hard to define martial arts movie feel very successfully. It's also interesting to read the afterwords at the back of the comics which clearly show the creators, post cartoon, dealing with the Bob Dylan style cries of "Judas" from the comic fans. They raise a good question: if you can still enjoy The Dark Knight Returns whilst children's underpants are being sold with the Batman logo on them, what stops you from still enjoying these comics.

I was also amused by how you can have a comic in which all the protagonists were identical if they put their weapons down.


TMNT & Other Strangeness was a great roleplaying game, I wish I hadn't sold my copy. Does anyone else remember it?
KevinandNick
I really must dig out the comic-book adaptation of Night of the Living Dead - haven't read it for ages!

The artwork was gorgeous and the covers were something else. smile.gif

Kev W
Jessopjessopjessop
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Jul 15 2008, 12:46 PM)
In the process of my girlfriend moving into my house we unearthed some Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics circa 1989.
*

I had a collected book of the TMNTs before I started reading any Marvel stuff. I used to copy the the art and make paintings in acrylics, which was fun.

And props to Bronia's Dad!
empathy-with-beast
He worked on pretty much everthing that Henson did post Labyrinth: Babe, The Storyteller, Dinosaurs... I am continually impressed.
dandan
QUOTE (Jessopjessopjessop @ Jul 15 2008, 01:57 PM)
I had a collected book of the TMNTs


i still have green-grey sponge-suit sushi turtles in my bookcase...
empathy-with-beast
I read Dark Victory in preperation for this weekend's Bat fest. I like its Year One/ Year Two setting ( effectively a world where Batman still has an uncomfortable relationship with the authorities, is still heavily traumatised by his parent's death but which most of the costumed villains have already emerged.) and the sequencing of the death of Robin's parents is excellent as is much of the adoption of Robin plotline. Anything that can convince you it isn't a stupid idea for batman to let a twelve year old boy follow him around for none dubious reasons gets my vote.

The detective bit I could kind of take or leave, but the aproach to Bruce Wayne's psychological state and the tensions between "the freaks" and the ordinary criminals in Gotham are excellent.

I believe this last aspect is something we're going to see in the film, and it makes me hopeful.
maian
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Jul 16 2008, 03:38 PM)
I read Dark Victory in preperation for this weekend's Bat fest. I like its Year One/ Year Two setting ( effectively a world where Batman still has an uncomfortable relationship with the authorities, is still heavily traumatised by his parent's death but which most of the costumed villains have already emerged.) and the sequencing of the death of Robin's parents is excellent as is much of the adoption of Robin plotline. Anything that can convince you it isn't a stupid idea for batman to let a twelve year old boy follow him around for none dubious reasons gets my vote.

The detective bit I could kind of take or leave, but the aproach to Bruce Wayne's psychological state and the tensions between "the freaks" and the ordinary criminals in Gotham are excellent.

I believe this last aspect is something we're going to see in the film, and it makes me hopeful.
*


I agree wholeheartedly with all of these points. There's an awful lot to love in Loeb and Sale's depiction of the characters and the continued decline of Harvey Dent is, as far as I'm concerned, the best treatment the character has so far received.
NiteFall
Apologies if I've posted this before but- Batman in a nutshell.
empathy-with-beast
That is excellent.
maian
I've started reading Volume 1. of Scott Pilgrim's Precious Little Life and I'm enjoying it hugely so far. Any comic that features references to Launchpad McQuack and Super Mario Bros. enemies in its first few pages is always going to dig its hooks into me from the off.
NiteFall
Just started readfing Transmetropolitan. It's not bad is it?
Hobbes
For anyone who hasn't seen/heard of the recent Astonishing X-Men Whedon/Cassaday run, you should really check it out if you're a fan of comics. It's brilliantly written (Joss himself is in the writer's chair so little surprise there) and John Cassaday's art is wonderful aswell - his perspective of Hank McCoy's Beast is the best I've ever seen on the character. It's got the traditional aspects of Whedon humour, but it's a brilliantly crafted series which really gives all the characters depth and intrigue.

For once, a comic book series genuinely living up to its name.
melzilla
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Jul 16 2008, 05:52 PM)
Apologies if I've posted this before but- Batman in a nutshell.
*


I liked this lots.
Sostie
Just picked up an ex-display copy of The Walking Dead Deluxe edition for half price at FP. Which was nice
maian
Can anyone recommend Tank Girl? I'm a huge admirer of Jamie Hewlett's work and I've been meaning to check it out for a while, is it as good as I have heard?
melzilla
QUOTE (maian @ Jul 23 2008, 02:26 PM)
Can anyone recommend Tank Girl? I'm a huge admirer of Jamie Hewlett's work and I've been meaning to check it out for a while, is it as good as I have heard?
*


I haven't read it for years, but it was probably one of the first comic books I actually read and what got me into comics in the first place. It was very different and fun for it's time, but may seem a little stale now, I don't know. (I haven't read any of the new stuff) From what I remember, and for the artwork alone, I would say the original few series are worth checking out, though.
empathy-with-beast
QUOTE (maian @ Jul 23 2008, 02:26 PM)
Can anyone recommend Tank Girl? I'm a huge admirer of Jamie Hewlett's work and I've been meaning to check it out for a while, is it as good as I have heard?
*


Yes, but you have to approach it bearing in mind that, especially in the case of the earlier stuff, it emerged it a fairly brief episodic format within Deadline (was that the magazine's name?) so that sometimes it feels a little like a strip in Viz rather than a "proper" comic.

I will get round to sending you Powers soon I promise.
Sostie
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Jul 23 2008, 03:54 PM)
Yes, but you have to approach it bearing in mind that, especially in the case of the earlier stuff, it emerged it a fairly brief episodic format within Deadline (was that the magazine's name?)
*



Yup it was Deadline. (I sold her first appearance for a pretty price some years ago on Ebay)
GundamGuy_UK
Bought V For Vendetta while I was in town today.

Not seen the film because I'd heard it was rubbish, and I don't really know a whole lot about the comic, so I'm looking forward to reading this.
maian
Read Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth yesterday which I thought was a very interesting psychological horror story that made very good use of the Rogue's Gallery, particularly the Joker, and the intercutting between the present day events and those of the life of Amadeus Arkham, the founder of the Asylum, was very well done by Grant Morrison. However, I do sometimes struggle with Dave McKean's artistic style and this was very much one of the instances where it didn't gel with me. I think the guy is wonderfully talented and unique, but sometimes it just doesn't seem to fit the material.

I also started reading The Ballad of Halo Jones and From Hell. I wasn't particularly taken with Halo Jones since the constant desire for cliffhangers is something I'm not used to seeing in Moore's work and I feel that I should probably delve into more 2000AD stuff first to get a feel for the style. From Hell, on the other hand, had me straight away. Though it's a real tome of a graphic novel, the richness of the language and story keeps it from ever feeling stale. A million times better than the film version.
GundamGuy_UK
I was thinking of getting From Hell too, if Waterstones had it (they didn't).

I'll order it from Amazon then if it's good. Again, I've not seen the film version.
Raven
QUOTE (maian @ Jul 23 2008, 02:26 PM)
Can anyone recommend Tank Girl?


I saw here when I was walking home from work last night.
melzilla
QUOTE (GundamGuy_UK @ Jul 24 2008, 05:12 PM)
I was thinking of getting From Hell too, if Waterstones had it (they didn't).

I'll order it from Amazon then if it's good. Again, I've not seen the film version.
*


I read the comic first and loved it but, even so, I quite enjoyed the film version.
maian
QUOTE (melzilla @ Jul 24 2008, 06:42 PM)
I read the comic first and loved it but, even so, I quite enjoyed the film version.
*


Oh, I don't think the film is terrible, just that the book is much, much better.
Rebus
Is Constantine worth getting into? I was unfortunately exposed to the film, but always liked the idea of the character and haven't read anything so far.
curtinparloe
Finished From Hell, loved it, and the staggering amount of research Moore did is breathtaking.

Black Hole
About a body-morphing STD amongst the teenagers of a small US town. To be honest, the 70s setting spoiled it a bit, and I had trouble telling the characters apart, but interesting none the less.

Spider-Woman: Origins
Alright, I guess. Why doesn't she have any nipples?

And I mentioned loving Tank Girl a couple of weeks ago too smile.gif
Sostie
QUOTE (Rebus @ Jul 25 2008, 03:48 AM)
Is Constantine worth getting into?  I was unfortunately exposed to the film, but always liked the idea of the character and haven't read anything so far.
*



Is there a Constantine comic called Constantine? If there isn't you probably mean Hellblazer. I stuck with it for the first 30 issues or so in the 80's, and yes it was very good.
curtinparloe
The New Avengers
It was OK.

Blade of the Immortal
Very slicy.

100 Bullets: First Shot, Last Call
Impenetrable use of slang, not sure I like the art, but the idea's interesting.
maian
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Jul 19 2008, 07:41 PM)
Just started readfing Transmetropolitan. It's not bad is it?
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QUOTE (Hobbes @ Jul 20 2008, 05:42 PM)
For anyone who hasn't seen/heard of the recent Astonishing X-Men Whedon/Cassaday run, you should really check it out if you're a fan of comics. It's brilliantly written (Joss himself is in the writer's chair so little surprise there) and John Cassaday's art is wonderful aswell - his perspective of Hank McCoy's Beast is the best I've ever seen on the character. It's got the traditional aspects of Whedon humour, but it's a brilliantly crafted series which really gives all the characters depth and intrigue.

For once, a comic book series genuinely living up to its name.
*


Read the first Transmetropolitan collection, Back In The City and Astonishing X-Men: Torn today and I enjoyed both immensely.

I loved Transmetropolitan, in particular, since it drew me into to its vast, sin and violence filled world instantly, and the character of Spider Jerusalem is one of the most singularly entertaining I have ever read in a comic. A barely concealed homage to Hunter S. Thompson, Spider is a gonzo journalist who kicks some serious arse and his every action and thought is a joy to behold. Pitch-black humour, pathos and some wonderful writing make for a real peach of a story that I am salivating over seeing expand.

Torn was also good, probably the most satisfying of Whedon's run writing Astonishing X-Men, and the fact that it happens separate from anything occurring in the rest of the Marvel universe makes for a fairly light and enjoyable read. However, as with the rest of the run, I can't help but think that it's hindered by the alien aspect. I hate aliens in the X-men, with the exception of the Phoenix Saga, and while Joss does handle them well, I can never get over my own personal dislike for it. Still very good, though, and it's clear that Joss is having a ball writing for one of his idols, Kitty Pryde, and her phasing at the point of orgasm made me laugh.
Hobbes
There were a lot of elements of fanboy-ness in that run, but I for one enjoyed it. I never found the off-world or alien elements of X-Men to be any worse than anything else. I think it's because the founding concepts of the comic are so fantastical anyway I find it much easier to accept aliens in those kind of scenarios rather than, say, a major film sequel which came out this year.

There are loads of good alien ideas in the Marvel universe though if you think about it. You mentioned the Phoenix saga, but what about the Phalanx saga, the Brood, Galactus and his legions and the Shi'ar? I think they are as important as any other storylines in the Marvel universe, and possibly better. It gives the opportunity to add interesting characters in aswell, like Princess Lilandra or Gladiator from the Imperial Guard. Plus you have to include stuff like Magneto's Asteroid M which started waaaay back when.

I don't think the outer space elements are any more unbelievable than something like the Age of Apocalpse and Legion Quest series in the mid-90s or the Mojoverse.
maian
It's not about believability, I think it's fair to say that reading a comic in which characters can control the weather and shoot lasers from their eyes means that you're willing to suspend your disbelief, it's just that I personally don't like them and often find them to be a convenient way for writers to get around explaining problems or just allowing a story to go in a completely leftfield direction with little or no other need for explanation and is a vestige of the early days of the comic that should have been pruned long ago in the same way that writers have learned that you can't just go ''Nuclear power did it'' and think it's a decent explanation.

I don't think they are all terrible, as I said, I love the Phoenix Saga and think that Whedon has implemented the alien aspect in a much better way than most, it's just that a lot of the time it feels unnecessary and lazy to me and is the exact opposite of what I like about the X-Men, which is its focus on how the characters are inherently human and their position as outsiders. Every page that features Kitty Pryde or other characters dealing with their own problems fascinates me, but anything in which aliens are on a space station orbiting Earth just bores me.
mousespider
I just finished reading Watchmen for the first time. Damn good.
GundamGuy_UK
QUOTE (mousespider @ Aug 3 2008, 12:44 AM)
I just finished reading Watchmen for the first time.  Damn good.
*


It really is.

Can anyone recommend any single-volume stand-alone graphic novels?

Stuff like Watchmen, V for Vendetta etc, where you buy the 1 book and that's it for the entire story? I want some more comics but I'm on a bit of a budget, and as much as I like Batman/X-Men, I want something new but don't want to have to buy 8 books at 20 each to enjoy it (I'm looking at you, Akira...).
empathy-with-beast
We3 by Grant Morrison is a good (and cheap) one. It's about domestic animals that have been turned into weapons of war.
mousespider
I've been meaning to get into the character for a while now, so I ordered Vol. 1 of the Deadpool Classic collection. Once I get some more cash I'll probably start getting the Cable&Deadpool TPBs.
Withnail
QUOTE (GundamGuy_UK @ Aug 2 2008, 11:47 PM)
It really is.

Can anyone recommend any single-volume stand-alone graphic novels?



'Wanted' is superb.
Ade
QUOTE (mousespider @ Aug 3 2008, 12:44 AM)
I just finished reading Watchmen for the first time.  Damn good.
*

Likewise! I think I pretty much finished it on the same day, though it's taken me nearly two months to get through it. Very good indeed, and probably the first comic series I have actually read in its entirety.

I've never been a 'fan' of comics, I'll be honest. Never really got it into them when I was younger, and as such have never appreciated the appeal. But I must say how much I have enjoyed Watchmen.

I have to say though, and I'll probably be lambasted for saying it, but I got more than a little fed up of the comic-within-a-comic element after a while. Don't get me wrong, it's a nice touch, but I just felt my interest levels waning, and as a consequence I found myself skimming a lot over the Black Freighter sections in order to get back to the story proper. Sacrilege perhaps, as I realise that it mirrors certain aspects of the main story, but it just got a bit too dense for my feeble brain to deal with at the moment. I fully intend to re-read it before the film comes out, as there are no doubt many layers that I have missed, and will hopefully appreciate second time round.
Rebus
I'd say a lot of people will be reading Watchmen for the first time over the next six months or so, and as I haven't done so in years I'm going to have to hunt them down again.
Hobbes
QUOTE (Ade @ Aug 6 2008, 10:08 PM)
I have to say though, and I'll probably be lambasted for saying it, but I got more than a little fed up of the comic-within-a-comic element after a while. Don't get me wrong, it's a nice touch, but I just felt my interest levels waning, and as a consequence I found myself skimming a lot over the Black Freighter sections in order to get back to the story proper. Sacrilege perhaps, as I realise that it mirrors certain aspects of the main story, but it just got a bit too dense for my feeble brain to deal with at the moment. I fully intend to re-read it before the film comes out, as there are no doubt many layers that I have missed, and will hopefully appreciate second time round.
*


I actually agree with this Ade so don't worry. I too love the idea, especially the idea that superhero comics ceased to popular when real masked heroes turned up, but there's no need to include the entire thing I don't think. I understand its parallels to the main story etc, but it does detract from the utter genius of the main story.
maian
QUOTE (Withnail @ Aug 6 2008, 09:48 PM)
'Wanted' is superb.
*


I thought Wanted was a big ol' pile of wank.

Just so Joe has a balanced idea of what to expect.
ipse dixit
I read The Long Halloween. I read it too quickly. Kinda detracts from the whole passage-of-time thing. Still good though.
maian
Just finished From Hell by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell and I thought it was brilliant, possibly Moore's best work. Well, I say I've finished it, I'm now getting through the Appendices and it's exhausting work. The sheer level of research and detail he put into writing the thing is staggering.
Hobbes
Finished re-reading watchmen the other day, and funnily enough it's still tremendous.

Also bought the Long Halloween and Sin city: a dame to kill for. Read sin city, it was good but I preferred The hard Goodbye. Again contained some lovely artwork and a great story, but my only problem is that they're pretty short, i bought and finished this one in a day and only read it for about an hour and a half.

Looking forward to the Batman one though, if it's a patch on Return of the Dark Knight it'll be fucking awesome.
maian
Started reading Alice In Sunderland by Brian Talbot in Borders today. Wow.
ipse dixit
QUOTE (Hobbes @ Aug 13 2008, 02:17 PM)
Long Halloween
*
Learn from my mistake and take a bit more time over it. I read through it too quickly and it really lessened the epic-ness of it.
thirtyhelens
How did I not know that Moonstone did a Buckaroo Banzai prequel? ohmy.gif

http://www.moonstonebooks.com/banzai.asp
NiteFall
The deluxe edition of The Killing Joke is only 6 at Amazon at the moment. I've never read it. I'm assuming it's worth getting at that price?
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