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curtinparloe
QUOTE (KevinandNick @ Feb 10 2009, 03:00 PM) *
Besides, it feels like I'm getting fucked every time I buy a large popcorn at one of their establishments. wink.gif


laugh.gif It's funny 'cause it's true.

Forced my film tastes upon a friend on Sunday/Monday:

Amelie
Magical.

Oldboy
Awesome.

Delicatessen
Brilliant.
NiteFall
Punisher: War Zone.

Tragilarious. Maybe even hilariawful.
melzilla
Arse, arse, arse!

Just found out my local Odeon was showing 'Man on Wire' tonight as a 'Director's Chair' screening; I've been wanting to see it for ages and just missed it!

Gah!
NiteFall
Don't worry. I found out that there was a showing of My Name Is Bruce last week with a Bruce Campbell Q&A last week in Edinburgh. Of course I had to go and find out yesterday. Which is worse than not knowing at all.
curtinparloe
Five Minutes, Mr Welles
A short film (just, at 30 minutes) directed by and starring Vincent D'Onofrio, concerning Orson Welles' ferris wheel speech in The Third Man.

This is what short films can be like.
monkeyman
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Feb 10 2009, 11:35 PM) *
Punisher: War Zone.

Tragilarious. Maybe even hilariawful.

Hah, I've been trying to find a decent copy of this. I've oly found I think the one you have, with polish (or something) subtitles and fairly bad quality in general.


QUOTE (NiteFall @ Feb 10 2009, 11:47 PM) *
Don't worry. I found out that there was a showing of My Name Is Bruce last week with a Bruce Campbell Q&A last week in Edinburgh. Of course I had to go and find out yesterday. Which is worse than not knowing at all.

[/Insert Vader NOOOOOOOOOOO!]
NiteFall
I actuially went to the cinema and watched it. Which makes it worse I feel.
Kick in the Head
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Feb 11 2009, 11:12 AM) *
I actuially went to the cinema and watched it. Which makes it worse I feel.


Me too, but I don't regret it. In fact, I enjoyed it quite a bit. The neon lighting, the dodgy performances, the OTT villains...it was like Batman and Robin with heads being blown apart. Hadn't seen the previous Punishers but thought Ray Stevenson was a fine vigilante, and even though the final hotel shoot-out was disappointing and the use of free-runners clearly the 'new' bullet time (even though it's clearly old hat already), the rest was punchy, shooty junk of the reasonably entertaining kind, rather than either the cynical (a la Shoot 'Em Up) or depressing (a la Rambo) varieties.

It was also enlivened by the fact there were two white-haired dearies in their 60s in the audience who we thought had wandered into the wrong screening, but they stayed through the whole thing and came out smiling and laughing.

And yes, The Crazies is also good. Rough around the edges, certainly, but bleak and upsetting indeed. I just hope the remake doesn't resort to making those infected become 28 Days Later 'ragers', and keep them as just unspeakable loonies.
melzilla
Doubt

Strong, yet subtle and hugely compelling. A cleverly and thoughtfully delivered plot and an excellent script performed to perfection by all involved.

Recommended.
NiteFall
QUOTE (Kick in the Head @ Feb 11 2009, 04:57 PM) *
Me too, but I don't regret it. In fact, I enjoyed it quite a bit. The neon lighting, the dodgy performances, the OTT villains...it was like Batman and Robin with heads being blown apart. Hadn't seen the previous Punishers but thought Ray Stevenson was a fine vigilante, and even though the final hotel shoot-out was disappointing and the use of free-runners clearly the 'new' bullet time (even though it's clearly old hat already), the rest was punchy, shooty junk of the reasonably entertaining kind, rather than either the cynical (a la Shoot 'Em Up) or depressing (a la Rambo) varieties.


Oh don't get me wrong. I enjoyed it. It was certainly the best film I've seen in a while where someone gets their face punched off. And it was nice seeing one of the free runners getting blown up with a rocket launcher which I think made me laugh harder than anything else in the film.
monkeyman
Reeeeealy have to watch it soon.

I got hold of 2001 A space Odyssey the other day as well, been meaning to watch that for a long time and am quite looking forward to it.
sweetbutinsane
Chocolat

I recorded it on New Year's Eve and only just got around to watching it last night. I enjoyed it a lot more than I was expecting to.
logger
QUOTE (monkeyman @ Feb 11 2009, 07:06 PM) *
I got hold of 2001 A space Odyssey the other day as well, been meaning to watch that for a long time and am quite looking forward to it.

If you've not seen it before you'll either love it or hate it.
monkeyman
I'm gonna watch it this weekend with the Hayleigh hopefully.
logger
It's one of my all time favourites but it is one of those films.
maian
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 11 2009, 10:21 PM) *
It's one of my all time favourites but it is one of those films.


For me it's a film that is technically brilliant but which I can't really connect with. Speaking of which...

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)

As with most films I see, I went in having mixed expectations. The trailer had me excited, the fact that it threatened to be Meet Joe Black Part Deux had me worried. In the end, it fell somewhere between these two points, occasionally veering closer to one then the other.

Technically, it's a sublime film that's gorgeous to look at; take any frame from it and it'd make for a beautiful painting. The aging effects are subtly convincing and the recreation of the various periods are immaculate. David Fincher repeats the same trick he pulled with Zodiac by making a film that's very long but which breezes along and doesn't feel like it for the most part and he handles all the various pieces, from conversations to a superb WWII battle, with real skill. However, there are sections of it that draaaaaaag. The bits with Tilda Swinton really slow the film down, the framing device of Cate Blanchold and Julia Ormond being in a hospital is dull and only just about pays off, the last half an hour or so really felt like a very long time.

On the other hand, most of the rest of the film, thanks to its vignette nature, went by quickly and managed a balance between the seriousness of Benjamin's predicament and the humour that arose from it. The romance between Blanchett and Pitt was also well handled and didn't become as creepy as it really should have.

Performances are good all round, though Pitt does only really shine during the old sequences as he successfully manages to channel the energy of a 12-year old inhabiting the body of an 80 year old. The rest of the time he settles into his usual lazy style. Blanchett is good as she ever is and Taraji P. Henson is brilliant as Benjamin's adoptive mother, Queenie.

There's a fair bit of Forrest Gump and Big Fish in its DNA, though I don't think it's as good as the former or as soppy as the latter, but I couldn't help but think of it as being like Burn After Reading, and not just because of the shared cast members. Both films had bits in that I liked but which were, all in all, unsatisfying. However, I do think that Benjamin Button is better than Burn After Reading since at least it has some heart to it and a certain charm that prevents it from becoming the completely unwieldy lump that it threatens to be at times.

I'd be lying if I said that parts of it didn't touch me, the scenes between Benjamin and his real father were very poignant, as were his scenes with the middle-aged Blanchett, but for the most part it left me cold. Looks very good, though.


Possible Worlds (2000)

Canadian film starring Tilda Swinton and focusing on a man who seems to experience all the various possible lives in all possible universes at the same time. In one universe, he is trying seduce Joyce (Swinton), a stock broker, in another, he's trying to seduce Joyce (Swinton), a urologist, and in another he has been murdered and police are trying to find out who did it.

It's an interesting philosophical experiment that verges on the sublime when it considers the idea of a man so in love with a woman that he will try to be with her over several dimensions. The finale soured it somewhat for me but it's an intelligent and intriguing film.


The Deal (2003)

Not a film per se but never mind. A look at the relationship between Gordon Brown (David Morrissey) and Tony Blair (Michael Sheen) that traces their friendship from their first meeting as newly elected MPs in the 80s, through their years in opposition and culminating in the pact that would see Brown give the Labour Leadership to Blair, make Blair Prime Minister, and lead to a certain degree of antagonism between the two some years later.

As good as it was when I first saw it on the telly some years ago, the film has only become more fascinating as time has gone on. Since Brown has now become Prime Minister, it's interesting seeing what his position within the party was like before he rose to prominence and what his relationship with Blair may have been like.
Sostie
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 12 2009, 12:27 AM) *
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)

There's a fair bit of Forrest Gump and Big Fish in its DNA, though I don't think it's as good as the former...


Oh it's better. I didn't walk out after BB thinking "Hmmm, well that was shit"
dandan
the curious case of benjamin button - looks the same, smells the same, feels the same.

benjamin (brad pitt) was born in new orleans, on the day the first world war ended. his mother, caroline (joeanna sayler), died during the birth and his father, thomas button (jason flemyng), disturbed by the infant benjamin's bizarre appearance, leaves the child on the steps of a house and flees. benjamin is discovered and taken in by queenie (taraji henson), the proprietor (?) of an old people's home, who easily forgives him his oddities and loves him as her own.

benjamin, despite being but a few days old, is riddled with arthritis, deaf, blinded by cataracts and has the skin of a man in his nineties. still, instead of dying after a few weeks of life he begins to grow; as he grows, instead of ageing further, he gets younger...

so, i thought i'd hate this. i find mr pitt to be decidedly hit and miss, and i'm no real fan of mr fincher. well, i didn't hate it, which is a start...

now, what i find interesting is that the two biggest films of the moment - 'the curious case of benjamin button' and 'slumdog millionaire' - are films with a finite narrative structure attached to them. with 'slumdog'; we know jamal's answering twelve (or however many there are; oh, the irony...) questions and we're getting to see how his life supplied him with the answers. with 'button', we know he's born as an old man and ages in reverse until he dies as a baby. they also share a big-budget-'tales of the unexpected' quality or enjoy the influence of 'the wonderful story of henry sugar' (another dahl creation); both in their magical realism and story within a story elements...

with both films, i would say, that i ended up watching them just to see them run their course. hardly glow praise, really. still, i'd say that i enjoyed watching 'button' more than 'slumdog'. despite dod mantle's work on the latter, 'button' is a much nicer film to look at; even with it being the usual muted, washed out, colour palette that fincher always seems to adhere to. then there's the make up and special effects trickery that allow brad pitt to be transformed into the tiny, crooked, old man of benjamin's youth, through to the teenage (?) incarnation who is seen towards the end of the film. very good it is too. top marks. oh, and there's also another nice soundtrack from, the increasingly prolific, alexandre desplat.

pitt does some reasonably good work, mainly when aided by special effects and make up, whilst cate blanchett, who plays the love of benjamin's life, is also reasonable. and, it's always nice to see jason flemyng...

all in all, for it's two hours and forty minutes, it is a relatively entertaining watch, that's pretty to look and doesn't drag. the narrative is a little twee and a little silly (even barring the obvious, ageing in reverse motif), whilst a lot of the humour, drama and emotion seems a little forced. another triumph of the utterly mediocre...
logger
Matinee

Probably my favourite Joe Dante film.
Atara
I adore Forrest Gump. I doubt I will like Benjamin Button more purely because it lacks Tom Hanks, but I do want to see it as I am all curious now.

I do love me some Tom Hanks, though
dandan
revolutionary road - plenty of people are onto the emptiness, but it takes real guts to see the hopelessness...

suburbia. america. the 1950s. april (kate winslett) and frank (leonardo di caprio) wheeler are married with a couple of young children and live in a sweet little house on revolutionary road. when they met, april held aspirations of being an actress, whilst frank was a longshoreman with no real aspirations of being anything.

a couple of years down the line and april isn't enjoying being a housewife and has a disastrous turn in a bit of local am-dram. meanwhile, frank is working for the same company his dad worked for, hating it and, as he turns thirty, has an early-mid-life crisis. in the form of maureen (zoe kazan), a new member of the secretarial pool...

in an attempt to bring their marriage, and themselves, back to life, april comes up with a plan: the wheelers shall relocate to paris. still, things aren't always as easy as they seem...

so, sam mendes in film about troubled middle-class relationships in american suburbia shocker! right, that's out of the way, without me even mentioning that 'american beauty' is a bit crap, really.

any how, based on the much lauded novel, of the same name, 'revolutionary road' is a rather interesting film. one, which apart from miss winslett's best actress nominations, i knew nothing about. it is a film that i ended up rather enjoying, but it was a tricky road to get to this point. the first third of the film is a little messy; it flings itself around and takes a while to settle into any kind of rhythm, the same seemed to be true of winslett and di caprio, both as an on-screen pairing and as individual performers. still, by the film's climax, i had warmed to it and to them.

the americana-melodrama quality of the film certainly allows winslett to cut her acting chops and she probably deserves the nod, accordingly. still, it was the adult di caprio, who surprised me; i didn't think i've seen him in a role where he appears to be a bona fide adult, and not some odd man-child creature. he was good. additional mentions / praise for michael shannon, who cropped up a couple of times as the "certified lunatic" son of some neighbours and provided some rather big laughs, also for dylan baker, kathy bates, richard easton and zoe kazan; with whom, some kind of mid-life crisis would be nice...

watching the film with someone who had, literally, just finished reading the book, was also interesting. "an excellent adaptation" was their learned verdict. i commented that knowing the characters already probably helped the first third of the film a lot. i'm wondering if a second viewing may help it: i wouldn't be averse to watching it again in the future...

oh, and as much as deakins seems to have a very good habit of making things look pretty when he points his camera at them, i'm delighted to see kristi zea and debra schutt get several nominations, including one for the best achievement in art direction oscar. if you're a fan of the decorative arts of the 1950s, this film is an absolute treat. all good.

in the end, it's pretty good stuff...
sleeping_pirate
QUOTE (melzilla @ Feb 11 2009, 06:16 PM) *
Doubt

Strong, yet subtle and hugely compelling. A cleverly and thoughtfully delivered plot and an excellent script performed to perfection by all involved.

Recommended.

I really want to see this.
maian
I saw the beginning and end of Doubt whilst at work, so I can tell you that it starts and ends strongly. The middle could be rubbish, though.
logger
Let the Right One In

Never has a film so brutal made me go 'Awww' so much. Very Scandinavian use of vampire mythology as metaphor for childhood, particularly loneliness, desperation and empowerment, and with the outstanding lead actors being twelve years old, steers clear of the overly cliched sexualization of vampires.

For the first hour this is pretty much a perfect film but I felt like it lost something in the narrative after that, especially whenever the plot moves away from the relationship between the main characters, and even has a couple of slightly contrived moments. And the cat attack is a little silly. These are only slight problems but are emphasised by the rest of the film being so good.

I worry a little about this when it's released in the UK becoming the subject of hysterical controversy with such young characters being used in such extreme themes, particularly the violence, that whilst being brutal, you don't actually see that much. Europeans can be so grown up about depicting childhood it puts us to shame.

I'd definitely recommend this and suspect that its slight flaws will seem less obvious with repeated viewing.
melzilla
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 13 2009, 12:45 PM) *
I saw the beginning and end of Doubt whilst at work, so I can tell you that it starts and ends strongly. The middle could be rubbish, though.


It's not. wink.gif
Sostie
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 13 2009, 04:37 PM) *
Let the Right One In

I worry a little about this when it's released in the UK becoming the subject of hysterical controversy with such young characters being used in such extreme themes, particularly the violence,



If it was enirely true to the novel the Daily Mail would be so maddened it would go on a killing spree surpassing the brutality on screen. And then have sex with car wreck victims. And ring Andrew Sachs.
maian
^ I'm really looking forward to seeing that. I'm going to pick up the book when I next get paid.

The Milky Way (1936)

The good thing about Lovefilm is that if you have a list that's 353 titles long, they eventually send you stuff that you don't remember choosing in the first place. This was one such moment, and I wound up liking it an awful lot.

Burleigh Sullivan (Harold Lloyd) is a milkman who, through a sequence of coincidences, is believed to have knocked out the middle-weight boxing champion of the world in a street brawl. To save face, the champ's manager takes Burleigh under his wing and fixes a number of fights for him so that he'll be able to fight the champ in a legitimate match and lose, thus allowing the champ to recover from his embarrassment. Throw in a love interest, a dumb sidekick for the champ and a couple of horses and you've got a pretty genial little comedy.

It's an interesting little film for a number of reasons. Firstly, I'm always fascinated by any film in which a silent movie star has to make the switch to delivering dialogue. I don't think this was Lloyd's first talkie, but it was his most successful and it's not hard to see why; he mixes his finely honed ability at slapstick with a likable persona and decent comic timing. He's kind of one note and his supposed arrogance towards the end of the film doesn't really come across, so there isn't much dramatic tension with regards to how his success affects his relationships.

Secondly, it's directed by Leo McCarey, who had previously directed Duck Soup and would go on to great success with Going My Way and An Affair To Remember. There's a lot of similarities in style between this film and Duck Soup, with one line seeming to have been taken directly from it, and I couldn't help but recast it in my head starring The Marx Brothers, though it probably wouldn't have worked as well as it does.

A fairly decent screwball comedy, and better than that Orlando Bloom remake.
Starscream`s Ghost
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 13 2009, 06:38 PM) *
Going My Way


One of my favourite all time movies.
logger
QUOTE (Sostie @ Feb 13 2009, 06:29 PM) *
If it was enirely true to the novel the Daily Mail would be so maddened it would go on a killing spree surpassing the brutality on screen. And then have sex with car wreck victims. And ring Andrew Sachs.

Have you read it? Having looked on IMDB there was something mentioned that I would never really have picked up on watching the film.
Sostie
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 13 2009, 07:10 PM) *
Have you read it? Having looked on IMDB there was something mentioned that I would never really have picked up on watching the film.


Indeed I have. And very good it is too. What "something" do they mention on IMDB?
logger
That Eli is actually a boy who has had his genitals removed.
logger
Flags of Our Fathers

Okay but it was hard to sustain interest, which is a pity as the story deserves a better film.

I'm getting a bit fed up of all these ordinary folk making sacrifices war movies, I want to see some real life sociopathic basterds. When are they going to make the 'Paddy' Mayne story?
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 13 2009, 06:38 PM) *
The Milky Way (1936)

The good thing about Lovefilm is that if you have a list that's 353 titles long, they eventually send you stuff that you don't remember choosing in the first place. This was one such moment, and I wound up liking it an awful lot.

Burleigh Sullivan (Harold Lloyd) is a milkman who, through a sequence of coincidences, is believed to have knocked out the middle-weight boxing champion of the world in a street brawl. To save face, the champ's manager takes Burleigh under his wing and fixes a number of fights for him so that he'll be able to fight the champ in a legitimate match and lose, thus allowing the champ to recover from his embarrassment. Throw in a love interest, a dumb sidekick for the champ and a couple of horses and you've got a pretty genial little comedy.

It's an interesting little film for a number of reasons. Firstly, I'm always fascinated by any film in which a silent movie star has to make the switch to delivering dialogue. I don't think this was Lloyd's first talkie, but it was his most successful and it's not hard to see why; he mixes his finely honed ability at slapstick with a likable persona and decent comic timing. He's kind of one note and his supposed arrogance towards the end of the film doesn't really come across, so there isn't much dramatic tension with regards to how his success affects his relationships.

Secondly, it's directed by Leo McCarey, who had previously directed Duck Soup and would go on to great success with Going My Way and An Affair To Remember. There's a lot of similarities in style between this film and Duck Soup, with one line seeming to have been taken directly from it, and I couldn't help but recast it in my head starring The Marx Brothers, though it probably wouldn't have worked as well as it does.

A fairly decent screwball comedy, and better than that Orlando Bloom remake.

I might have to seek this out - I used to look forward to watching Harold Lloyd on BBC2 at teatime when I was a kid.
Omniscia
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 14 2009, 10:09 AM) *
I'm getting a bit fed up of all these ordinary folk making sacrifices war movies, I want to see some real life sociopathic basterds. When are they going to make the 'Paddy' Mayne story?


But look at The Patriot, for example. They took a real life sociopathic bastard and turned him into a paragon of virility and family values.
logger
QUOTE (Omniscia @ Feb 14 2009, 11:08 PM) *
But look at The Patriot, for example. They took a real life sociopathic bastard and turned him into a paragon of virility and family values.

And that was just Mel Gibson. fnar
maian
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 14 2009, 03:09 PM) *
Flags of Our Fathers

Okay but it was hard to sustain interest, which is a pity as the story deserves a better film.

I'm getting a bit fed up of all these ordinary folk making sacrifices war movies, I want to see some real life sociopathic basterds. When are they going to make the 'Paddy' Mayne story?


You should check out Letters From Iwo Jima. It's a far superior film and actually enriches FOOF.

I saw the end of Vicky Cristina Barcelona at work today. Looked alright. The mutant rabbit was a bit much, mind.
Zoe
Penelope (2006)

Very lightweight with a bizarre mix of accents and settings. It's set in a fairytale cross between NY and London where no one is sure whether they're English or American. The central conceit fails thanks to Christina Ricci being far too cute with a pig nose.

Two stars - McAvoy's performance nearly erases all the good work he did in 'Atonement', this + 'Wanted' almost take me back to thinking he's an untalented, rat-faced little creep.

Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008)

Just great. Really witty and visually stunning with a compelling and imaginative story. My only criticism is that the franchise feels so episodic. The film feels very cinematic in itself, but the stories feel like something out a great TV show (read comic) in that I want to know what happens to the characters now. Fingers crossed Guillermo will make one of these every couple of years for the rest of his days.

Four stars

27 Dresses (2008)

Still great and up there with '13 going on 30' in terms of my favourite recent romantic comedies.

Four stars

And I'm now destroying its romantic vibe by watching

The Shape of Things (2003)

I really love this film, it's as close to a perfect adaptation of a play as you can get. And what a play!

Four stars
maian
QUOTE (Zoe @ Feb 15 2009, 02:36 AM) *
The Shape of Things (2003)

I really love this film, it's as close to a perfect adaptation of a play as you can get. And what a play!

Four stars


Just googled this and it sounds very interesting. I really need to track down a copy of In The Company of Men.
Ade
QUOTE (Zoe @ Feb 15 2009, 02:36 AM) *
Two stars - McAvoy's performance nearly erases all the good work he did in 'Atonement', this + 'Wanted' almost take me back to thinking he's an untalented, rat-faced little creep.

Blimey, that's harsh. But then I've not seen 'Atonement' yet, and have no interest in 'Wanted', or 'Penelope' for that matter. Nevertheless, I would recommend you watch (if you haven't already seen it) Inside I'm Dancing - I thought he was pretty good in that. And it's a damn good film too, generally speaking. Aside from 'The Last King Of Scotland' and 'Bright Young Things' (also excellent), I think it's about the only thing I've seen him in, so I can't judge his skills with any real authority beyond that.
Zoe
His acting is fine in 'The Last King of Scotland', but the character he's playing is so unbelievably stupid it's hard to get behind that performance.

His American accent in 'Penelope' and 'Wanted' is really grating.

I do adore him in 'Atonement' though, he is exactly how I imagined Robbie.
sleeping_pirate
QUOTE (Ade @ Feb 15 2009, 01:18 PM) *
Nevertheless, I would recommend you watch (if you haven't already seen it) Inside I'm Dancing - I thought he was pretty good in that.

I love that film, it makes me cry every time I watch it.
Crutch
Spun - I know it by heart but I'd forgotten how good it really is. Surely an influence on Aronofsky. Love it.

Pi - I've also forgotten how stunning this masterpiece is.

No Country for Old Men - So great. Even so I couldn't barely understand any of Jones lines.

Sunshine - Such a visual movie. I'd love to see it on the big screen again, there it really crushes you.
dandan
tampopo - i would love to eat that with you....

goro (tsutomu yamazaki) and gun (ken watanabe) are truckers; one night they stop at a small noodle bar, run by tampopo (nobuko miyamoto). after a fight with a local drunk, goro ends up sleeping in the noodle bar and eating breakfast with tampopo. he compliments the breakfast, but he and gun are less complimentary about her noodles. after giving her a few tips, goro is persuaded by tampopo to help her develop her skills, so she can produce the perfect bowl of noodles...

wow, it's such a long time since i've watched this, having seen it on tv, probably when i was still at school. i'm please to say that i enjoyed it just as much, many years later. writer / director juzo itami crafts a wonderful tale, that is as normal as it is surreal, at times magical and filled with a cast of great characters. the film is a comedy with the feel of a western, despite it's focus on ramen / noodles. the main narrative thread, of tampopo's quest is great enough, but this is then punctuated with several vignettes, all of which focus on food; the love of it's taste, feel and of sharing it with others.

i'm off out for dinner...

great stuff...



inglorious bastards - that's 'bastards', not 'basterds'...

as the allied troops make their way through europe, towards the end of the second world war, a bunch of soldiers are making a different journey. charged with various crimes, a truck full of murderers, thieves, deserters and other reprobates are setting out to be court marshalled. en route, they are attacked and, when the officer in command is killed, the survivors decide to head for the safety of switzerland. still, that's over one hundred miles away and that's a long way in wartime...

so, yeah, this is the original enzo g castellari film, not mr tarantino's forthcoming feature. and, as far as i can tell, barring the fact that they're both war films, there is next to nothing to connect them.

the film is a fun war romp, which is very entertaining despite (an sometimes because of) its minuscule budget. there's a whole heap of dreadful dialogue, some cheapo special effects and almost reasonable acting; all wrapped around a narrative which is actually pretty strong. if tarantino had taken the plot and dressed it up with a bit of a budget and some fine tuning, it would probably end up being a pretty good flick...

fun...



quantum of solace - i guess tosca isn't for everyone...

during an interrogation, the existence of an underground criminal organisation is revealed. no, not spectre; quantum! band (daniel craig), still reeling from his betrayal by vespa, sets out to find out more, which leads him to dominic greene (mathieu amalric)...

well, the first thing to say is that i enjoyed this about one thousand times more than crappy 'casino royale'. the narrative moves swiftly and evenly, even if it is a little sparse and there's plenty of running around, fighting, fast cars and killing. it's like the bastard off-spring of bourne (including shaky-can) and and old school bond: strangely minimalistic, with a dastardly big plot.

there's a big evil villain, a secret organisation, dastardly plots, double-agents and nice big buildings with fancy wall-coverings. what more could you ask for? craig is good, as is the platonic bond girl, olga kurylenko, who fooled me with her spanish accent. dench is dench an amalric is a nicely understated, nicely weedy, villian.

surprisingly good fun...
sleeping_pirate
I'm watching Being John Malkovich for the first time in aaaaages.
logger
QUOTE (dandan @ Feb 15 2009, 09:28 PM) *
i enjoyed this about one thousand times more than crappy 'casino royale'

You just made it into my cool book.
Shack
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 15 2009, 10:05 PM) *
You just made it into my cool book.


I bet it is bound in velvet.

The Dark Knight

A thoroughly good film in all senses of the word. Ticked the boxes marked acting, special effects, stunts and story and the 2 hours plus didn't seem that long.

My only negative? Batman's voice. It was so gruff, it sounded like a bear had dressed up in a rubbery suit instead.
sleeping_pirate
QUOTE (Shack @ Feb 15 2009, 10:27 PM) *
My only negative? Batman's voice. It was so gruff, it sounded like a bear had dressed up in a rubbery suit instead.

That was my one negative too.
logger
QUOTE (Shack @ Feb 15 2009, 10:27 PM) *
I bet it is bound in velvet.

I just scribble on the back of my hand sad.gif
logger
Badlands

It's a great film but it's just so dark that it's hard to love in the same way as Days of Heaven. It's a pity this has become a blueprint for inferior stories of hillbilly psychopaths and doomed hipster romance. Think I'll buy the dvd next time I see it cheap.
mcraigclark
American Teen

It's a documentary that follows the lives of some high school kids during their senior year in Warsaw, Indiana. Anyone who's ever set foot in an American high school has met each of the main characters a hundred times over. Megan is the pretty and popular girl, who is also kind of a bitch; Colin is the basketball star everyone loves; Hannah is the cute oddball who doesn't exactly fit in, but everyone seems to like her anyway; Mitch is the too-handsome-for-his-own-good heartthrob, who needs to learn some relationship etiquette; and poor Jake is the geeky, spotty kid who can't find a girlfriend. Nothing groundbreaking, but it's entertaining.
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