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maian
Be Kind Rewind

Endearingly shambolic, much like the Sweded films themselves.
UnderSpaced
Avatar 3-D

It sure was pretty and awesome in 3-D. Can't wait for the Blu-ray release.
sweetbutinsane
The Lost Boys

Silly and cheesy, but I still quite enjoyed it. To be honest, I was just glad that there was no sparkling involved. laugh.gif
NiteFall
The Bourne Identity- In which Matt Damon kills a man with a pen.
The Bourne Supremacy- In which Matt Damon kills a man with a magazine.
The Bourne Ultimatum- In which Matt Damon kills a man with a hardback book.

The lesson I have taken away from these films is that if you ever piss off Matt Damon you shouldn't do it in WHSmith.
logger
Doesn't he kill someone with a tea towel in one of them?
melzilla
Don't piss him off in Whittard's either.

Commando

Don't disturb my friend; he's dead tired.
Let off some steam, Bennett. etc.


The lols never get old.
empathy-with-beast
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 13 2010, 03:12 PM) *
Caramel

I spent a lot of it thinking "She looks like a Lebanese Meadow Soprano" and "He looked like a Lebanese Freddie Mercury until he shaved his moustache off, then he became a Lebanese Vincent Cassel" but underneath my stupid, stupid observations was a rich, warm and charming film about real women dealing with real problems in a way which was light but deeply affecting. I was a tad disappointed that the character who dressed like a lesbian turned out to, in fact, be a lesbian, but that was the only thing I didn't like about it.


I watched this right after having seen Iron Man, and I think my sensibilities might not quite have been in the right place.

Don't let the married man you're having an affair with and who is breaking your heart and all your close female friends know it speak to you like that! Shoot him with the laser gun inside your palm and then fly away!
ella
Steve got me Up! for Valentines and I got him Hurt Locker so we watched both yesterday.

Up! was just lovely. But incredibly sad and I spent a good portion crying. I

The Hurt Locker was great - amazing in Blu-ray but I think that it could have been a bit more than it was. Best bomb diffusion bits were in the first half an hour and it lacked a bit of momentum after that.
Raven
Local Hero

Still one of the funniest films ever made.
empathy-with-beast
Pet Semetery

A lot of history on thah road
I mainly watched this so I could check the references in South Park to itand also because Stephen King clamied it was the only film at the time apart from Thelma and Louise in which the central characters die at the end. which I'm sure can't be the case. It is kind of a creepy and unfogiving horror film but it suffers from the layers of horror that have been layered upon its central conceit. Nevertheless it plays with some nice "fear of the repressed" tropes better than many current films. I couldn't help thinking that the little boys voice had been the basis for Ike's in South Park as well though.
Everlong
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Saw this at the weekend found it fairly enjoyable too. Even though I felt it was stretched out a bit, strangely I felt the later scenes with Benjamin becoming a child, plus the hospital scenes with Daisy and her daughter were quite rushed.

Despite that, I think it's a pretty good film in all, there's great performances all round, with some beautiful directing from Fincher (as always).
maian
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Feb 15 2010, 12:04 PM) *
Pet Semetery

A lot of history on thah road
Stephen King clamied it was the only film at the time apart from Thelma and Louise in which the central characters die at the end. which I'm sure can't be the case.


I think that Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid would definitely fall under that banner. Did he just mean in terms of the contemporary films, or in the history of cinema as a whole?
curtinparloe
QUOTE (ella @ Feb 15 2010, 09:18 AM) *
Steve got me Up! for Valentines


No breakfast in bed then?

QUOTE (melzilla @ Feb 15 2010, 03:56 AM) *
Commando

Don't disturb my friend; he's dead tired.
Let off some steam, Bennett. etc.


The lols never get old.


My favourite is "I let him go."
empathy-with-beast
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 15 2010, 12:31 PM) *
I think that Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid would definitely fall under that banner. Did he just mean in terms of the contemporary films, or in the history of cinema as a whole?


I don't really remember. I think he may have been talking about "during the 80's" but then its true of loads of other horror movies at the time as well.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (ella @ Feb 15 2010, 09:18 AM) *
The Hurt Locker was great - amazing in Blu-ray but I think that it could have been a bit more than it was. Best bomb diffusion bits were in the first half an hour and it lacked a bit of momentum after that.


I thought it was great kaboom of a movie also. And Jeremy Renner is like the best bits of Martin Freeman and Daniel Craig in one person. Bigelow still rocks. Yeah.

The Wolfman - silly cheesy Gothic fun and games. And blimey - someone is a huge massive League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Fan. I spotted Mina, Jekyll/Hyde, Quartermain and Captain Nemo (complete with kirpan!) in the film - like they leaped from the pages of Moore but this time, just playing different characters.

The period atmosphere was impeccable. I understand the connections to Sleepy Hollow especially since this move was written by the same bloke and also had spooky Danny Elfman music. Wonderful use of the British landscape and screen favourites such as Lyme Park and The Old Operating Theatre (where my friend used to work!). Not just LoEG - I noted nods to From Hell, American Werewolf in London, Stoker, Stevenson and Conan Doyle too; which of course pleased me immensely. Excellent comic support from Hugo Weaving and Anthony Sher and countless other character actors with interesting period faces.

Alas, Ole Hopkins was hammier than a charcuterie and kept pausing like he forgot his lines, ha! But didn't matter cos he suited the role as an eccentric old colonial. Emily Blunt was perfect as the fiesty English Rose and Del Toro wasn't hugely annoying - remarkable! Although the least believable aspect was that old Mumble-Pants could perform Shakespeare on the Victorian stage to huge acclaim. Even so - he looked pretty in a frock coat and that made up for all kinds of things.
Outatime
American Wipeout is much better than our Total Wipeout.
logger
The Shining

The film that most reminds me of my childhood. (true story)
maian
I took the plunge and decided to enter The Room last night. Here are my thoughts on it.

I also watched Ratcatcher, the debut film by Lynne Ramsay, director of Morvern Callar and the original director of The Lovely Bones before Peter Jackson took over. Very reminiscent of early Ken Loach, Ramsay creates a gritty and grim version of Scotland in the 1970s in which to set her story of a young boy (William Eadie) trying to hide a terrible secret from his friends and family, and who gradually starts to disappear into flights of fancy on a disused council estate. The moment when Jamie leaps througha window to run through a cornfield summed up what made the film really work for me; a burst of whimsy, light and happiness that never quite escapes the harsh reality of its surroundings. I really wish she had been able to direct The Lovely Bones, now.
logger
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 16 2010, 02:00 PM) *
I took the plunge and decided to enter The Room last night. Here are my thoughts on it.

It's weird to read anything resembling a serous review of this film. The normal rules just don't apply here.

QUOTE
Either Johnny is the most caring, sensitive guy in the world

Yeah.
maian
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 16 2010, 02:42 PM) *
It's weird to read anything resembling a serous review of this film. The normal rules just don't apply here.


I know! The contradictions are tearing me apart.
Zoe
I'm guessing this is one of those things you have to see?
logger
QUOTE (Zoe @ Feb 16 2010, 03:09 PM) *
I'm guessing this is one of those things you have to see?

I think you'd enjoy it.
maian
It is wonderfully awful.
Kick in the Head
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 16 2010, 03:25 PM) *
It is wonderfully awful.


Brilliant. Glad you took to it, Ed.

What really sets it apart is indeed the personal aspect to it, just as you highlight Glen or Glenda as the closest comparison. Most bad films are desperate horror or sci-fi pieces that try and make a quick buck and don't understand the craft of the genre they're floundering in (I plan to watch other Best Worst Movie Troll 2 soon, but doubt it'll be as beyond credulity as The Room). Both Wood and Wiseau clearly wanted to tell a story that meant something to them and to involve themselves so thoroughly in every aspect of the production, especially playing the leading role, was clearly not just out of necessity.

You can get strangely academic about The Room, even more so studying audience reactions to it at the special cinema screenings. I would love to write a BFI guide to the whole thing - it thoroughly deserves one.
maian
QUOTE (Kick in the Head @ Feb 16 2010, 06:56 PM) *
Brilliant. Glad you took to it, Ed.

(I plan to watch other Best Worst Movie Troll 2 soon, but doubt it'll be as beyond credulity as The Room).


I was involved in running a documentary film festival a few months ago and, due to the many hours I worked making sure that things didn't fuck up something awful, I missed the opportunity to see a screening of Troll 2 with the documentary Best Worst Movie, about the cult of the film. I'm really gutted I didn't get to see it, since a full theatre really does seem like the place to see a film as transcendentally awful as Troll 2 or The Room.

I watched Red Road earlier. Having been mightily impressed by Andrea Arnold's second film, Fish Tank, I thought it was worth seeing her debut. Boy, was it worth it. It starts out quite slowly, as it introduces us to Jackie, a CCTV operator who observes the Red Road council estate in Glasgow and who sees a man she recognises from her past, at which point the film unfolds in strange, ususual and uncomfortable ways. Though it's a much more polished looking film than Fish Tank - even though it is handheld, it's not digital and has the warmth of film to it - it still maintains the same level of unease throughout as we try to figure out what the connection is between Jackie and the man she begins to stalk, and as the film takes some surprising turns. I don't want to say too much, other than I think it's a really terrific film and totally justifies the hype around it.
sweetbutinsane
The Wolfman

Cheesy and gory and fun! happy.gif
monkeyman
Wolfman
Not bad.
Shack
Up In The Air

George Clooney travels around the country sacking people and building up his airmiles when technology starts to encroach on his goal. He ends up taking Anna Kendrick (who was marvellous) around to show her that her technological cost saving solution is the plops.

I really enjoyed it. There are plenty of decent lines, good jokes and it's about the right length without getting tired. Kendrick gets most of the best (unknowing) lines and Vera Farmiga plays a sexy travelling temptress.

Worth watching, although the bit with the man who has the enormous moustache seems a little illogical in terms of planning ahead, but you'd have to watch it to know what bit I mean.
curtinparloe
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 16 2010, 07:44 PM) *
I watched Red Road earlier. Having been mightily impressed by Andrea Arnold's second film, Fish Tank, I thought it was worth seeing her debut. Boy, was it worth it. It starts out quite slowly, as it introduces us to Jackie, a CCTV operator who observes the Red Road council estate in Glasgow and who sees a man she recognises from her past, at which point the film unfolds in strange, ususual and uncomfortable ways. Though it's a much more polished looking film than Fish Tank - even though it is handheld, it's not digital and has the warmth of film to it - it still maintains the same level of unease throughout as we try to figure out what the connection is between Jackie and the man she begins to stalk, and as the film takes some surprising turns. I don't want to say too much, other than I think it's a really terrific film and totally justifies the hype around it.


It is great, but watching them the other way around left me largely disappointed by Fishtank.
Julie
Some Kind of Wonderful

How have I never seen this!?
maian
Living In Oblivion

Steve Buscemi plays a director trying to make an independent film. Unfortunately, everything seems to be against him; the boom keeps getting in the shot, the smoke machine won't work, and the his leading lady (Catherine Keener) slept with the leading man (James Legros), a pampered and preposterous slumming movie star, and they can't get through a single scene anymore.

Perhaps most famous now for Peter Dinklage's hilarious tirade about how dream sequences always use dwarfs, even though no one has ever had a dream featuring a dwarf, Living In Oblivion is a funny farce that perfectly captures the exquisite mix of chaos and boredom that is the making of a film. There isn't really much of a story, it's really just three segments in which the characters try, and repeatedly fail, to actually film something, but it's clever and fun.

Dead Presidents

The Hughes Brothers' follow-up to Menace II Society is a less violent affair but no less powerful than their incendiary debut. The film stars Larenz Tate as Anthony Curtis, a young black man in the late 60s who goes off to fight as a marine in Vietnam. Upon his return, he has trouble returning to civilian life, and becomes involved in a scheme to rob a truck carrying notes intended to be destroyed.

By starting the film with Anthony waiting for the heist to begin, then cutting to several years before and letting the story of how he was driven to commit a crime, the Hughes Brothers explore a number of themes relating to the experiences of young black men in America at the time: The trauma they experienced as a result of going of to war, the lack of recognition of their sacrifices when they came back, and the tensions that arose amongst the black community between those who went off to fight and those who hated them for fighting a war for the White Man.

The highlights of the film are definitely the heist itself, which the film spends 90 minutes building to and is suitably tense, and a sequence half an hour in that depicts Anthony's experiences in Vietnam. It's a sequence that captures the terror, violence and madness of Vietnam in as visceral a manner as any number of films.
maian
Kafka (1991)

Following the success of the low-key, lo-fi wonder that was sex, lies and videotapes, Steven Soderbergh chose Lem Dobbs' script about Franz Kafka (Jeremy Irons) becoming embroiled in a dark murder mystery as his second film. It's not hard to see why Soderbergh would want to make the film; the clout that winning the Palm d'Or on your first go gave him meant that, rather than just making another low-budget film about real people, he could indulge his love of classic cinema by applying the style and mood of German expressionist films to a story that would explore some themes from Kafka's works, particularly The Trial and The Castle.

However, despite an atmosphere of dread that is at times suffocating - the high contrast black and white photography and eerie ambient soundtrack reminded me very much of Eraserhead - and a plot about bureaucracy, paranoia and unseen malevolence that lovingly captures many of the essential tropes of Kafka's work, the film never really worked for me. This is largley because Kafka's work is very internalised and about the impact of the machinations of world on his protagonists, so externalising it and making the threat into cackling lunatics that run around murdering people loses the ethereal fear that makes Kafka such a fascinating writer. And the shift towards the end from a low-key sense of dread to a science-fiction infused action set piece right out a Bond film, complete with gun fights, a megalomaniacal speech and the inside of a brain projected onto the ceiling, really doesn't make any sense in terms of the style of the rest of the film.

Technically very impressive and undoubtedly interesting, but not actually all that good.
Sostie
QUOTE (Julie @ Feb 18 2010, 01:35 AM) *
Some Kind of Wonderful

How have I never seen this!?


A real surprise because

a) it's a great film

and

b) it's named after you.
Raven
QUOTE (Sostie @ Feb 19 2010, 03:21 PM) *
A real surprise because

a) it's a great film

and

b) it's named after you.


You ole smoothy, you . . .

Stardust

Brilliant! An excellent story and some great performances, but above all a whole lot of fun!
maian
In The Loop

As good as the first time I watched it, and Peter Capaldi is still phenomenal. I think my favourite part of his performance might be the couple of seconds when, after Linton humiliates him, Malcolm becomes briefly unable to insult Toby. It's a really nice, subtle moment in which he lets Malcolm get genuinely ruffled and upset.
logger
Would I like it if I don't like The Thick of It?
maian
I'm not sure, to be honest. It's got a wider scope than The Thick of It, and the inclusion of American actors does alter the tone and feel of it. I suppose it depends what it is you don't like about The Thick of It that will most determine whether or not you like In The Loop.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (logger @ Feb 20 2010, 07:27 PM) *
Would I like it if I don't like The Thick of It?


No. Stick to what you like and know. You will only say 'I can't see what the fuss is about!'. We can save everyone some time by circumventing this step and perhaps, saving some money along the way. Everyone wins.

I'm trying to be nice by the way. I am just very protective about Malcolm Tucker. smile.gif
sweetbutinsane
Minority Report

Excerpt from a text I sent to my friend last night:

"Tom Cruise is being punched in the face by Colin Farrell. I like this film."
logger
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Feb 21 2010, 01:46 PM) *
I'm trying to be nice by the way. I am just very protective about Malcolm Tucker. smile.gif

I've wanted to like it, I've loved everything else Iannucci has done and just wondered if I'd like In The Loop.
maian
Zodiac

Still bloody brilliant. This time, I watched it with one of my housemates, who didn't know that the case was never solved, so there was an extra bit of fun to be had from her trying to second-guess the plot, and every few minutes saying things like "It's Jake Gyllenhaal, isn't it?", "No, wait, it's the other cop. The one who was in ER", "It's Robert Downey, Jr.!" and "Your silence says it all."
maian
King of the Hill (1993)

Steven Soderbergh's third film and, demonstrating that his chameleonic charms were right there from the beginning, he followed up the dreary and ponderous, if occasionally interesting, Kafka with a radically different film: Set in St. Louis during the Great Depression, King of the Hill is a film about Aaron (Jesse Bradford), a 12-year old boy who finds himself living alone when his mother is taken ill and moved to a sanatorium, his brother is sent to a relative because the family can't afford to stay together, and his father disappears on a business trip. Left to his own devices, Aaron has adventures with his friend Lester (Adrien Brody), tries to meet the mysterious Mr. Mungo (Spalding Gray) and finds himself having to deal with the affections of girls (played by Amber Benson and Katherine Heigl)

Though that plot suggests that the film is going to be a bit of a romp, Soderbergh creates a film that is much more affecting than if he had just made a family film. There's a real sense of Aaron's privations throughout the film - one scene has him eating photos of food from a magazine because he has no means of getting real food - and his development as the film goes on. At the beginning, he's ashamed of his family and lies prodigiously about their situation (saying that his dad is a pilot who works for the government, that they are living in a hotel until their mansion is built etc.) to better fit in with the richer kids at his school, but through having to fend for himself he grows up.

It reminded me in a lot of ways of Empire of the Sun: Both focus on young boys who, due to external circumstances, become separated from their families, both are coming of age stories in which the extreme privations they suffer teach the protagonists about what really matters, and both stories are based on memoirs, or at least on works inspired by the author's life. King of the Hill is a much more measured film, it not featuring a war or anything, but it's no less affecting or warm a tale. It's easily the Soderbergh film I have liked the most on first viewing.
logger
Predator

Man is freed from his role as an 'expendable asset' in the military-industrial complex by a confrontation with nature on its terms and becomes an ubermensch. Like Herzog and shit.

The attack on the guerrilla base is still one of the best action sequences evers!!!
Shack
QUOTE (maian @ Feb 21 2010, 10:17 PM) *
Zodiac

Still bloody brilliant. This time, I watched it with one of my housemates, who didn't know that the case was never solved, so there was an extra bit of fun to be had from her trying to second-guess the plot, and every few minutes saying things like "It's Jake Gyllenhaal, isn't it?", "No, wait, it's the other cop. The one who was in ER", "It's Robert Downey, Jr.!" and "Your silence says it all."


Sounds a bit like there's a career as a dodgy copper in the offing.
maian
She'd definitely be the sort of cop who just hurls questions at a subject until they do something. Like laugh.
Sostie
AVATAR

I chose to see this in 2-D because I wanted to see a movie not go to an amusement park ride. I admit the script wasn't nearly as bad as expected, and it did look pretty, but there is not one ounce of originality in this film - the idea of "Avatars" was similar to the ideas in Surrogates; telepathic links with animals, especially the flying lizards, is lifted from Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders series; the ground lighting up as you walk on it is from..ermm...Jacko's "Billie Jean" video. That's just a few of the little ideas. The plot, motivation, characters, everything...all seen before. Oooh look an alien creature. It's like an earthly one but it has SIX LEGS!

Has the majorty of people been suckered by this film? There is very little interaction between the "real" world and the CGI world. Motion capture of characters is nothing new. So what do we have? A CGI cartoon. This is a better rendered Final Fantasy.

An average film.

If you didn't have to dig up and fight for the mineral Unobtanium, would it be called Obtanium?


THE LOVELY BONES

Hmmm. I liked the Earthly bits. The world between Heaven and Earth I'm not too sure about. Jackson goes all Heavenly Creatures but with more money. He sometimes gets a bit carried away - a montage of our heroine having fun in the in between world is terrible. In the hands of a less fantastical director it may have been better.

PUSH
Bit like Heroes. It was alright. Dakota Fanning was good.

IGOR

Real fun Burton-esque CGI cartoon. John Cusack voices a hunchback who tries to build an evil monster but instead builds a nice sweet girlie monster who wants to become an actress after accidently being brainwashed by a TV transmsiion of James Lipton! Good stuff, with some laugh out loud lines.
maian
QUOTE (Sostie @ Feb 22 2010, 09:57 PM) *
THE LOVELY BONES

Hmmm. I liked the Earthly bits. The world between Heaven and Earth I'm not too sure about. Jackson goes all Heavenly Creatures but with more money. He sometimes gets a bit carried away - a montage of our heroine having fun in the in between world is terrible. In the hands of a less fantastical director it may have been better.


The more distance there is from my viewing of it, the less I find to like in it. I wish Lynne Ramsay had been able to make it.
maian
A Single Man
Jubei
OUTLANDER

3 from Tesco, it's biggest selling point was that it was produced by the producer of Lord of the Rings. I had low expectations. On the plus side: Spaceships, aliens and Vikings. In the end, I actually quite enjoyed it. The alien - the Moorwen - was actually pretty cool, and bizarrely you pretty much end up empathizing with it, although I don't think that's entirely intentional. I would definately rate this film as a cheesy no-brainer stupid action flick.
Jon 79
Despite all the bad reviews, I thought The Lovely Bones was great.
I can understand people not being pleased with the 'heaven' bits... they were all over the top. But i think the obvious use of CG here works. The CGI used in LOTR and Kong was great, but not perfect. The effects in this film were also great and don't look too real, but their falseness works given the context. I enjoyed them.
The overall film ticked the right boxes though. Given the dark subject matter, it's not an easy watch.
Grim, beautiful and emotive.
8/10


QUOTE (Sostie @ Feb 22 2010, 09:57 PM) *
AVATAR

I chose to see this in 2-D because I wanted to see a movie not go to an amusement park ride.

You've not seen it in 3D yet then?
This is one movie that is definitely improved with 3D.

The extra dimension fools our idiot brains more into thinking the blue people are real.
Also most (or probably all) of the action is level with, or behind the cinema screen. Not in front of it. - there are no gimmicks at any point. No-one trying to poke you in the eye with a stick.

My uncle went to see the film, and told me he thought the 3Dness was rubbish. ....I think he was expecting the amusement park ride.


It is an average film, but Cameron only wrote it to make the best of the new technology.
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