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maian
Gray's Anatomy (1996)

A filmed version of Spalding Gray's monologue of the same name, in which Gray recounts his experiments with alternative medicines after he was diagnosed with a rare eye condition and - due to his upbringing in a Christian Scientist which did not believe in doctors and medicine - was too afraid to go to see a doctor. Over the course of 80 minutes, Gray lets his neuroses flow forth and takes us on a journey that includes Indian sweat lodges, an unlicensed doctor who told him would have to live on nothing but raw vegetables, and an ill-advised trip to the Philippines to be treated by the "Elvis Presley of psychic surgeons."

Gray was a brilliant raconteur and his fills his story with wit, humour and delightful details that really bring the story to life, turning a simple story into a piece of illuminating performance art, even before director Steven Soderbergh starts going to town with back projection, shadowplay and expressionistic lighting. Having not seen the original play performed as it was originally staged - just Gray with a desk and a glass of water on a stage - I can't decide if Soderbergh's direction enhances the story or distracts from it. There were certainly points where I felt he was too concerned with doing something interesting rather than serving the monologue, and I'd love to see a reading of it as a straight performance piece to see how they compare. Obviously, Gray isn't around anymore to stage it and I'm not aware of any other recordings, but it'd be interesting to compare the two.
logger
The Invention of Lying

Not funny and Ricky Gervais can't really carry a film.
Starscream`s Ghost
Notes on a Scandal

Well that was a complete let-down. It felt like only half of a film.
Zoe
I love that film, and the book, and North London.

I also liked The Invention of Lying

'I Love you Phillip Morris' (2009)


It was OK, but compared to similar films, about similar subjects ('Catch me if you Can', 'Confessions of a Dangerous Mind') it was a bit half baked.

I did enjoy seeing the man who ruins films in the Orange 'turn off your phone' cinema ads in an actual film. Can't help but think it would have been really great to have him turn up in the main feature, after seeing an Orange ad, while watching the film in the cinema. But hey, you can't turn back time.
Rua
I liked it, for what it was. A nice enough film.

What I enjoyed much more, was that the Green Marker escape part of the story is completely true.
Ade
For what it's worth, I really enjoyed Notes On A Scandal too.


Watched a few films this weekend: Almodovar's Volver (2006) which was particularly excellent, and also reignited my hots for Ms. Cruz. James Mangold's Cop Land (1997) - excellent downplayed turn from Stallone, and a great supporting cast including Keitel, some GoodFellas and the T1000. Followed that with Jacques Audiard (The Beat That My Heart Skipped)'s Read My Lips (2001) - had forgotten just how good it was. Want to seek out A Self Made Hero (1997) now, but I'm going to watch A Prophet (2009) next.
Sostie
Robin Hood
It's OK. Some accents are a bit odd. Very long with not much going on.


QUOTE (logger @ Sep 12 2010, 10:17 PM) *
The Invention of Lying


I really liked it. The scene where his mum dies always gets me.

One thing that did bother me about the film was that during filming The Culture Show did a feature on the making of the film, and about Karl Pilkington making his movie debut. He was in a scene that involved cavemen discovering lies or something. I wonder what happened to those scenes.
maian
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 13 2010, 10:00 AM) *
One thing that did bother me about the film was that during filming The Culture Show did a feature on the making of the film, and about Karl Pilkington making his movie debut. He was in a scene that involved cavemen discovering lies or something. I wonder what happened to those scenes.


I read somewhere that they were meant to form a prologue showing how this world existed through time but Gervais and Robinson cut them because they slowed the film down and they thought it would be better if they leapt straight into the world as it is now.

Rabid (1977)

Very early David Cronenberg film (it's only his fourth film) and typically gooey and horrible. Marilyn Chambers stars as a woman who, after being involved in a motorcycle accident, has experimental skin grafts in order to heal the severe wounds she received as a result. The treatment is successful, but then she starts attacking people, and the people she attacks start attacking other people, and so on and so forth.

A neat mix of zombie movie and disease outbreak movie, Rabid is much sloppier than some of Cronenberg's later efforts. (You only have to compare it to The Brood, which is much tighter and economical and which he made only two years later.) It has too diffuse a focus and spends too long with characters that are unimportant apart from their ability to spread the virus that drives everyone mad. (And their ability to extend the running time to something approaching 90 minutes.)

However, despite its looseness, it manages to pack in some really nasty body horror and an unremittingly bleak tone that made up for its low budget and lack of rigour.


I also wound up watching an hour of Broken Flowers, which I still think is a great film (It is, to me, what Lost in Translation is to a lot of people) but since I last watched it I've become more familiar with Jim Jarmusch's work, and I found it really fascinating as a result to see how unlike most of his work it is. It's nowhere near as stylised as Down By Law, Dead Man or The Limits of Control, and is the closest he's come (from what I have seen) to flirting with naturalism.
dandan
i rewatched...

'nord' - excellent norwegian depression road movie comedy...
'kung-fu panda' - just brills...
'election' - aces, aces aces. witherspoon is incredible, as is brodders...
logger
QUOTE (Zoe @ Sep 12 2010, 11:22 PM) *
I also liked The Invention of Lying

QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 13 2010, 10:00 AM) *
I really liked it.

I've been thinking about this lately and I think that I just don't have a good sense of humour. I did find Note On A Scandal hilarious though, so I guess I must have some sense of humour, just not a good one.
empathy-with-beast
Scott Pilgrim reminded me a lot of Inception. Botha ren't really about anything in particular other than their arresting visual style, except Scott Pilgrim knew it wasn't about anything and therefore had a better time.
monkeyman
That's a really good way of putting it (Scott Pilgrim at least, I haven't seen Inception yet).
sweetbutinsane
Prince of Persia

Still love it.
ella
Avatar - I hadn't seen it before. Meh. The animation was absolutely stunning but the storyline was predictable and overly long.

Kick in the Head
Resident Evil: Afterlife - pleh, since when did Paul (WS) Anderson forget to make actual movies? Even Aliens Versus Predator had some kind of narrative - the first half of this film tries desperately to undo the mess he's already got himself into at the end of the third film, while the second half is just one slo-mo action sequence after another. Despite having played all the games and seen all the films, I'm still not exactly sure what the hell is going on half the time. A lot of stuff happens without rhyme or reason, largely involving a giant axe-wielding brute and Albert Wesker, who's my favourite tongue-in-cheek videogame villain, though here he's not quite as fruity or camp as his digital counterpart, more of a left-over Agent Smith clone from The Matrix Revolutions. Admittedly, this is a step-up from Extinction, and is more competent than Apocalypse, but for all it's surprisingly epic scale and fairly decent 3D trickery, it gets pretty boring pretty quickly. Milla Jovovich records a few dull video logs on a camcorder when she really should be paying attention to the plane she's flying, Ali Larter gets to do the tedious temporary memory loss thing MJ did in the earlier installments and Wentworth Miller is introduced in a PRISON he needs to BREAK out of (and that's about it for any semblance of wit). It's a bad film, sure, but there's still enough "yeah, that was ok I guess" action beats and nods to the games to make it bearable. Another cliff-hanger climax teasing a particularly unexciting and inevitable sequel (for which I guess I am partially responsible, given its weekend box office success) fails to surprise, but really, where to from here?
Serafina_Pekkala
I have never seen a Resident Evil film.

Should I?
maian
No. The first is passable - there's a nifty bit where a guy gets diced with a laser and MJ kicks a zombie dog in the face (this means more to people who have played the games) - but it's really not worth the bother. Especially since the second film is one of the worst films I've ever seen.
Sean of the Dead
I had a friend who had a pirated copy of Resident Evil and on the fake DVD sleeve, the pirates chose a critic's quote that said "Basically a below average zombie-film". Not even pirates are willing to endorse it.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Sean of the Dead @ Sep 13 2010, 11:38 PM) *
I had a friend who had a pirated copy of Resident Evil and on the fake DVD sleeve, the pirates chose a critic's quote that said "Basically a below average zombie-film". Not even pirates are willing to endorse it.


You have helped me make my decision, thanks.

Red Road

Wonderfully shot and atmospheric film from Andrea Arnold - set in the most glum and grotty parts of Glasgow. It really does look like that. Some excellent and authentic performances too. But the pacing is a tad slow at times. And the cryptic nature of the plot - is well - cryptic. A bit more exposition would have been nice.
melzilla
Piranha 3D

Fish n' tits.

I particularly liked the bit where her scalp fell off.
dandan
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 13 2010, 11:25 PM) *
there's a nifty bit where a guy gets diced with a laser


yep, i'm pretty sure my brain is correct to only have stored that scene as a memory of the film...
Zoe
QUOTE (dandan @ Sep 14 2010, 07:20 AM) *
yep, i'm pretty sure my brain is correct to only have stored that scene as a memory of the film...


Me too, hence I love that film (the bit with the lasers)
Sostie
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 13 2010, 11:07 PM) *
I have never seen a Resident Evil film.

Should I?


I like the first two, despite a short fall of zombies, which is a bit of a faux pas when making a zombie film. On the plus side it has Milla Jovovitch kicking ass. They're a Paul W S Anderson exercise in hokum and for me are more preferable way to veg out in front of a TV rather than watching some so called high borw exercise in art house cinema.
Sostie
QUOTE (Kick in the Head @ Sep 13 2010, 10:23 PM) *
Resident Evil: Afterlife but really, where to from here?



Resident Evil: In Nudievision. Please
Ade
QUOTE (melzilla @ Sep 14 2010, 02:13 AM) *
Piranha 3D

Fish n' tits.

Best capsule review I've read in a while.
Sostie
QUOTE (melzilla @ Sep 14 2010, 02:13 AM) *
Piranha 3D

Fish n' tits.


This is a good sequel idea.

The they followed the original Piranha with the fish with wings idea.

Fish with Tits, now that's a winner
Everlong
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 14 2010, 10:52 AM) *
Fish with Tits, now that's a winner


Mermaids, or Mermaids with fish heads.

Either way.. Tiiiiits.
Sostie
QUOTE (Everlong @ Sep 14 2010, 11:31 AM) *
Mermaids, or Mermaids with fish heads.

Either way.. Tiiiiits.


Neither. Fish with tits.
Everlong
Ahhh. Fits.
logger
I liked the second Resident Evil in a shit film kind of way because it seemed to have the most nods to the games.

QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 14 2010, 10:52 AM) *
This is a good sequel idea.

The they followed the original Piranha with the fish with wings idea.

Fish with Tits, now that's a winner

Well, we have only seen the babies so far.

Does anybody know if anything happens during or after Piranha's credits?
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 14 2010, 10:52 AM) *
Fish with Tits, now that's a winner


Fish Tits

Titty Fish
Ade
'Titfish'.



From the brain of Tim Burton.
fatseff1234
Disturbia

I liked it. Neighbourhood kid goes all vouyer and stumbles upon a murderer. Good performances and a good script!
Sean of the Dead
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs
Really excellent. Shame the posters made it look terrible.
Kick in the Head
QUOTE (logger @ Sep 14 2010, 12:04 PM) *
I liked the second Resident Evil in a shit film kind of way because it seemed to have the most nods to the games.

Well, we have only seen the babies so far.

Does anybody know if anything happens during or after Piranha's credits?


I concur - Apocalypse is an awful awful film, but it's the most like the games, so I can't help but end up watching it more than it deserves. It's funny how someone who's shot second unit stuff for major films can make such a slapdash job of the action scenes when they come to direct one.

As for Piranha, all that happens is a nibbled skull sinks through the bloody water - reminded me of this of all things.
melzilla
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 14 2010, 12:12 PM) *
Fish Tits


I like this. I'm going to use it in friendly banter.
empathy-with-beast
I have spent twenty four hours trying to think up a name for a fish that rhymes with a word for tits.

guppy puppies

That only came to me just then and it shows.
Rua
Shark Narks?

Too violent.

Sostie
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Sep 15 2010, 09:17 AM) *
I have spent twenty four hours trying to think up a name for a fish that rhymes with a word for tits.

guppy puppies

That only came to me just then and it shows.



Lung fish.

Amateur
Sostie
OK it's a a mammal but...

Norka The killer Whale
Sean of the Dead
Dirty minnows?
Ade
Wobbegongs?

QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 15 2010, 10:12 AM) *
Norka The killer Whale

Excellent.
logger
District 9

Ok but I'm still not keen.
Serafina_Pekkala
The Counterfeiters

Utterly marvellous German film about "Germany's greatest forger" who happens to be Jewish and ends up working for the Nazi war machine in a camp within a concentration camp. Karl Markovics as the titular Salomon 'Sally' Sorowitsch was utterly amazing - a self-serving criminal with a heart-of-gold is a hard character to get right. But he does it subtly and conviction. I hope he won loads of awards. And he looks like a weird cross between Armin Shimmerman and The Stath. The rest of the cast are also great - particularly the head of the camp (who tries to be both oppressor and friend to Sally) and the idealist political prisoner played by August Diehl (mein Liebchen) and various supporting characters.

I think this is one of the best war films I've seen so far - and I've seen a lot.
melzilla
Spratty-bojangles?
Ade
Immortal Beloved (1994)

While I'm not normally that fussed about classical composers, I've been wanting to see this portrayal of Ludwig Van Beethoven for years, and thankfully it didn't disappoint. Gary Oldman is as excellent as ever as Beethoven, in a genuinely serious and sensitive role compared directly with that of Tom Hulce's entertainingly brattish turn in Amadeus (1984). Beginning with the immediate aftermath of Beethoven's death, the film centres around his friend and secretary Anton Schindler (Jeroen Krabbé) as he attempts to uncover the identity of the mystery woman (named only as 'his immortal beloved'), to whom the composer has bequeathed his entire estate.

Told variously in flashback and present, the film gives us glimpses into the mind of the great composer, as well as focussing on his (often strained) relationships with his brothers, and indeed the various women in his life (all slowly unveiled as Schindler continues on his seemingly impossible task). It's a fine, fine film, and one I got far more engrossed in than I expected to. Rendered all the more moving too by a suitably chosen soundtrack of Beethoven's best, it naturally wouldn't be complete without the incomparable 'Ode to Joy', which is given its due in one of the film's closing sequences - and a beautifully poetic sequence it is too - gives me the shivers again just thinking about it.

In summary, it really is well worth a punt, and quite possibly something of a masterpiece. I shall definitely need to watch it again before Lovefilm get their DVD back.
Sostie
OUTLAW
A reactionary, exploitation film about a group of blokes let down by the law who decide to go all vigilante. I love Bob Hoskins, like Sean Bean and am always willing to give Danny Dyer a chance, therefore, a cliched , but passable piece of trash.
Zoe
All About Steve (2009)

One of the weirdest films I've ever seen. It reminded me that they used to make loads of really weird comedies like this in the eighties. They don't do that so much anymore, I wonder why? 'Better off Dead' is completely fucking mental.

Date Night (2010)

OK, Marky Mark is shirtless throughout most of it, which is nice.

I was ill, OK!?
NiteFall
Have you heard the comedy genius that is the commentary track where Danny Dyer and Nick Love compare Outlaw to The Godfather and Taxi Driver?
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 16 2010, 06:35 AM) *
The Counterfeiters

Utterly marvellous German film about "Germany's greatest forger" who happens to be Jewish and ends up working for the Nazi war machine in a camp within a concentration camp. Karl Markovics as the titular Salomon 'Sally' Sorowitsch was utterly amazing - a self-serving criminal with a heart-of-gold is a hard character to get right. But he does it subtly and conviction. I hope he won loads of awards. And he looks like a weird cross between Armin Shimmerman and The Stath. The rest of the cast are also great - particularly the head of the camp (who tries to be both oppressor and friend to Sally) and the idealist political prisoner played by August Diehl (mein Liebchen) and various supporting characters.

I think this is one of the best war films I've seen so far - and I've seen a lot.

This is another one in my Netflix queue that I'll be moving the top of the list.
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