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maian
Panic Rioom

Not as bad as I had heard some people say it would be, but it was really cold and clinical, which I think is a major problem for a film that focuses so much time on the relationship between a mother and a daughter. Fincher's depiction of the relationship between Jodie Foster and Kristen Stewart felt very superficial, so line like "It's disgusting how much I love you," which is already a fairly awful line, sounds even worse when nothing in the film suggests that is actually true.

I admired the plot, which used a simple conceit well and kept the idea of people staying in one room for an hour or so really compelling, but it all seemed too distanced, like Fincher and Koepp were luxuriating in their own cleverness than actually trying to engage with it, an idea that also plays into the long, CGI-enhanced tracking shots, which are technically well put together but every time the camera went through a key hole or a coffee pot handle it threw me completely out of the film.

A Lesson In Love

An Ingmar Bergman comedy? There is such a thing, though the actual difference between his comedies and his dramas seems to be very slim, since the film focuses on the sort of damaged people that he usually looks at (in its focus on a couple on the verge of a divorce it's kind of like Scenes From A Marriage played for laughs) and the characters still spend a lot of time discussing the nature of life, death and love, but this time he has airy violins rather than sombre cellos on the soundtrack, and the ending is a bit happier.

It's light, quickly paced and the characters are engaging, just not especially funny.
Zoe
Prince of Persia (2010)

Good! Stupid, silly and fun. Sort of Indiana Jones meets the first Pirates of the Carribean movie.

A funny script, well done action and a good cast are all you need to make a passable blockbuster - when we people learn!?

I believe you *TWANG, THUD, ARGH, DEAD*

I believe you too *SWIPE, GUSH, ARGH, DEAD*


Funny!
logger
I like Panic Room, although a big part of that is because I want to live in that house.
maian
It is a fucking amazing house.
dandan
QUOTE (Zoe @ Sep 23 2010, 01:23 PM) *
Prince of Persia (2010)

Good! Stupid, silly and fun. Sort of Indiana Jones meets the first Pirates of the Carribean movie.

A funny script, well done action and a good cast are all you need to make a passable blockbuster - when we people learn!?

I believe you *TWANG, THUD, ARGH, DEAD*

I believe you too *SWIPE, GUSH, ARGH, DEAD*


Funny!


your ill health and the sight of gyllenjake's powerful arms have clearly induced some kind of delirium...
sweetbutinsane
Boo!

I thought much the same as Zoe. It's not a brilliant film, but it's good fun nonetheless and that's why I love it.
Sostie
Frozen
First we had Open Water where a couple are stranded in the ocean, while sharks lay in wait hoping to make lunch out of them. Then we had Black Water where some people are stuck in a tree in a swamp while a crocodile lays in wait hoping to make lunch out of them. Now we have Hard Cold Water (well Frozen, but HCW fits better in this non-existent trilogy) in which 3 people are stuck in a chair lift and, as well as the harsh weather conditions, have to deal with a pack of wolves that lay in wait hoping to make lunch out of them. A simple idea, well executed – the sort of film savvy new filmmakers make as a “calling card”. It also avoided the twist I was expecting.

The Dark Hour (La hora fría)
Spanish sci-fi/horror in which 8 survivors of a nuclear war live in an underground facility, constantly aware that they under threat from both infected humans and mysterious creatures, The Invisibles. It’s an OK little film, though Spanish horror films where the main protagonist is a child is for me becoming as clichéd as Japanese horror films with ghostly females with long black hair.

Unknown
Five men – Jim Caviezel, Greg Kinnear, Joe Pantoliano, Barry Pepper and Jeremy Sisto - wake up in a locked down warehouse with no memory of how they got there or who they are. Through various clues in the building they are able to conclude that 2 of them have been kidnapped and the rest are kidnappers. Not knowing who is a good guy or a bad guy they try together to escape from the warehouse, and prepare for the arrival of the rest of the kidnap gang. Twisty little thriller, the kind that appeared in droves after Reservoir Dogs/Usual Suspects hit the screens. Not bad.

L'empire des loups (Empire Of The Wolves)
A young woman is suffering from gradual memory loss to the point where she begins to believe the man that says he is her husband isn’t. Meanwhile a young detective is investigating the brutal serial killings of illegal Turkish immigrants, and calls on the assistance of a disgraced cop (Jean Reno) to help him. A French thriller that doesn’t know whether it wants to be Tell No One or Crimson Rivers. The first third or so is very good but it lost it’s way a little (and my interest) as it went on.

Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid
Caught the second half on TV. A great film indeed, but I was left wondering, had there been many films before it that used the montage so much?


QUOTE (logger @ Sep 21 2010, 09:38 PM) *
GI Joe: The Rise of Cobra

...biggest surprise is that in a film full of bad accents the worst is Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's cockney accent, I think Mr Eko has been spending most of his time in the US of late.


Other than the ladies in the film and the fantastic scenes in Paris, I found it a bit dull. Eko's accent wasn't that bad
Serafina_Pekkala
The Girl Who Played with Fire
Twas okay - I guess. Mainly because the chick playing Lisbeth is good and there is some good Stockholm scenery (i want her apartment). But it is the usually Stieg Larsson illogical, poor sub-TV drama, unbelievable plot twists and 2-dimensional characters. I think craggy Norwegian faced Mikael Nyqvist is hot but sadly he was wearing a toupee not unlike that of the Vampire King of Mississippi. I don't know why they made him do that - cos his greying thinner natural hair is far far better. First movie was better. And that wasn't that good.
Outatime
I really liked the books but I didn't like Mikael Nyqvist at all, I thought he was completely wrong. The first film was a pretty poor adaptation I felt.
Starscream`s Ghost
Where the Wild Things Are

I should have known better than to expect Spike Jonze to actually make a kid's film out of this. As in, a film kids can watch and enjoy. Instead, he turned it into a pretentious, hipsterish mess. A film about being a child that appeals to adults, rather than one to appeal to children.

Awful.
Zoe
Damn skippy.
maian
I dunno, most of the kids who saw it at my work really seemed to like it. Obviously I didn't get a chance to ask each and every one of them, but the general feeling after each screening of it was very popular.

I still think it's a really great film.
Atara
Prince of Persia bored me. The acting was mostly wooden, Gyllenhaals accent was okay but he was clearly focussing on it so intensely that he forgot to make an effort at acting, aside from the occasional geeky smirk (d'aww) I wasn't at all fussed by him. It all felt so forced, with sub-par action sequences shoe-horned in to try make me pay attention again, the dagger seemed to barely matter and the attempts at comedy were much more miss than hit; I laughed once. Overall, a waste.
mcraigclark
QUOTE (Starscream`s Ghost @ Sep 24 2010, 12:06 PM) *
Where the Wild Things Are

I should have known better than to expect Spike Jonze to actually make a kid's film out of this. As in, a film kids can watch and enjoy. Instead, he turned it into a pretentious, hipsterish mess. A film about being a child that appeals to adults, rather than one to appeal to children.

Awful.


All of this, and a little more. It was exactly what I expected it to be, though.
Rebus
The Sting

One of those been-meaning-to-watch films that I have never seen. Great script, captures the feel of 30s Chicago perfectly (I'm guessing) and Robert Shaw as ever was simply brilliant. I found the plot very simple and the actual sting could have been seen from quite a distance, but that's not what was important. Everyone's performances in this were great, and it really made you feel a part of Newman's whole set-up. Worth the wait.
Kick in the Head
F - now, I must declare an interest here, as the reason I went to see this was because my brother did a bit of work experience working on the director's very early works - a couple of crappy cheapie DTV horror films - but hadn't seen anything since until this, his first proper film release (I believe). And while there are still some signs of his old ways (silly chanting music, a fair dollop of "Hello? Is anyone there?", and not quite understanding the level as to which to draw out tension to before it crosses over into tedium), it's still a fairly decent effort.

The acting is pretty good, buoyed by a few recognisable faces from small roles in big films and various telly shows, and it's not without a sense of humour and wit that balances the odd dialogue clunker. While there are the inevitable cliches, it doesn't always go for the obvious options that the set-up (an alcoholic world-weary teacher and his estranged daughter our terrorised by faceless hoodies after-hours at their school) may suggest. Rarely are any kills shown, rather their often impressively gory aftermath, and the hooded bad'uns skulk around, clamber about and drop in and out of frame that is more creepy than the free-running acrobatics I had feared. Even if it's not entirely satisfactory in offering an explanation as to why exactly any of this is happening, there's enough to admire to keep the film afloat, leading to a suitably downbeat and interesting ending.


Enter the Void - figured if I was going to see it, might as well see the alternative long version (with an extra 17 mins, bringing the running time to a 160 min total), plus a very brief intro from Gaspar Noe, and as an absolute fan of Irreversible, only saw it fit to give his latest a bash. And yes there were a fair few walk-outs, which led me to wonder why anyone there paying to see it on opening night at a sold-out screening of an extended version with the director failed to understand what they were getting themselves in for. I couldn't tell if they were bored or disgusted. Probably both.

Much like Antichrist was a mix of the stunning and the silly, so to does Enter the Void create an atmosphere unliked anything else - it's languid, hypnotic, and dreamy, yet also uncomfortable, seedy, and garish, following drug peddler Oscar's life and death in Tokyo, and his relationship with his sister Linda.

If the story itself is peculiarly simplistic, albeit mixing the past, present, and afterlife, one could argue that it's a case of style over substance, but in many ways, the style is the narrative - without the camerawork and special effects creating the sense of the POV of afterlife, there'd really be no sense in telling the story. And if the acting is often stilted and jarring (with only the young girl playing little Linda really offering a noteworthy performance), it didn't bother me - I've met a lot of people with all the emotional investment in their language as Oscar, and I thought it was a neat touch that his actual spoken dialogue mirrored how his internal monologue sounded.

But it is an exhausting watch, following mostly unlikeable self-destructive characters for over 2 and a half hours of despair and pretentiousness, and no amount of visual trickery and incredible shots over neon cityscapes will make the content within anymore palatable. With all the swooping and soaring, there's a very real threat the camera's going to disappear up the director's arse at any time - and it certainly comes close (though there is a neat meta gag too). Therefore, not everyone's cup of tea. But in summation...

Profound? Hardly. Ludicrous? Absolutely. But one hell of a trip? Definitely.
Zoe
The White Ribbon (2009)

It was good, but I couldn't really get into it. I could see why it deserved the praise heaped upon it, but I was less than enthralled. I could say that in a couple more ways but the sentiment would be the same.

Kick Ass (2010)

Good, but not mind-blowingly so. I spent a lot of it thinking about how 'Dave' is engaged to, and has just fathered a child with, a 43-year-old, it kind of took me out of the moment. The Chloe Moretz action sequences were very good.

Ho hum
Hobbes
I thought Where the Wild Things Are was pretty good, to be honest. Still felt a bit let down, thought there were quite a few missed opportunities, but I did enjoy it so unsure as to why so many people hate it quite so much. I can understand it wouldn't appeal to everyone, but surely it's not worthy of the kind of derision usually reserved for Garden State on here?

I'm just sayin'.

QUOTE (Rebus @ Sep 25 2010, 06:20 AM) *
The Sting


One of my favourite films ever made. Redford and Newman have never been better on screen together, and Shaw is a brilliant baddie. The poker scene on the train is hard to beat for celluloid cool.
Ade
The Sting is indeed most excellent, yes. Like Mr Rebus, I too didn't get around to seeing it until relatively recent years, and it truly was well worth the wait.

Actually, I've been meaning to undergo a proper trawl through the many as yet unseen films in Newman's back catalogue - I would certainly appreciate if anybody has any particular recommendations? I have already added The Verdict to this list, but can at least vouch for how essential Cool Hand Luke is, for anyone who hasn't seen it.
maian
Both The Hustler and The Color of Money are worth checking out. The Hustler is the better of the two, but there's some really good stuff in The Color of Money, too. The Left-Handed Gun is a cool, odd Western, as is Hud, which is the better of the two. I quite like The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, but that's more for John Huston's writing and directing than for Newman's performance.

I wouldn't recommend Torn Curtain, which is a latter-day Hitchcock film starring Newman. That combination sounds amazing, but they hated each other and the film feels like the work of two people who really don't want to spend any time with each other. It's kind of interesting in an attempt to make a spy film that is as far removed as possible from the Bond films, and features a really quite nasty sequence in which they show how difficult it would be to actually kill a man, but is othewise best avoided.

I've just realised that today is the two-year anniversary of Newman's death, so watching one of his films would be an appropriate tribute if anyone is looking for something to do today.
dandan
QUOTE (Starscream`s Ghost @ Sep 24 2010, 05:06 PM) *
Where the Wild Things Are

I should have known better than to expect Spike Jonze to actually make a kid's film out of this. As in, a film kids can watch and enjoy. Instead, he turned it into a pretentious, hipsterish mess. A film about being a child that appeals to adults, rather than one to appeal to children.

Awful.


upon it's release, the critical response to the book was of a similar tone to your reaction to the film. well, not just your reaction, a lot of people's reactions...
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 26 2010, 01:36 PM) *
Both The Hustler and The Color of Money are worth checking out. The Hustler is the better of the two, but there's some really good stuff in The Color of Money, too. The Left-Handed Gun is a cool, odd Western, as is Hud, which is the better of the two. I quite like The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, but that's more for John Huston's writing and directing than for Newman's performance.

I wouldn't recommend Torn Curtain, which is a latter-day Hitchcock film starring Newman. That combination sounds amazing, but they hated each other and the film feels like the work of two people who really don't want to spend any time with each other. It's kind of interesting in an attempt to make a spy film that is as far removed as possible from the Bond films, and features a really quite nasty sequence in which they show how difficult it would be to actually kill a man, but is othewise best avoided.

I've just realised that today is the two-year anniversary of Newman's death, so watching one of his films would be an appropriate tribute if anyone is looking for something to do today.

Thanks Ed. I actually have both The Hustler and The Color Of Money on DVD, and have previously watched them both, albeit in the wrong order. I hadn't realised until I was reorganising my DVD shelves (by director) recently that the latter of the two was directed by Scorcese, so I've been meaning to give it another spin - so perhaps this evening (uncanny about the two-year anniversary).

I will defnitely check out those two Westerns at some point too, cheers for the thumbs-up.
logger
Predators

All the ingredients are there but they just don't seem to add up and it ends up feeling hollow and even a little boring. It should be the better film but personally I enjoyed AVP quite a bit more.
sweetbutinsane
Anastacia

I've watched it once before and I still can't decide whether I like it or not. Bit annoying really, as the whole point of watching it again was to decide whether to keep it or trade it in at CeX.
logger
The Hangover

Watchable if not particularly funny comedy. It's probably down to the direction, Ken Jeong jumping naked from the boot of a car and beating people up should be funnier than that.
Zoe
The Men who stare at Goats (2009)

Funny, but I think I would have preferred a Jon Ronson documentary to this fictionalised account. Has anyone seen (or know where I can get hold of) the Kubrick's boxes doc he made?

Juno (2007)

I think I was a little harsh in my initial review. She's more annoying than I remember (and the dialogue is painful at times); but the emotional effect of giving away the baby isn't anywhere as near as underplayed as I remember it.

Michael Cera runs that film.
Rebus
Iron Man 2

I was waiting for the big finale, and was still waiting for it when the credits rolled. Yes we expect Tony Stark to be self-indulgent and narcissistic but it seemed that that was the approach Favreau took with the whole film, and not just Stark. They did bugger all with Sam Rockwell, Gwyneth Paltrow was more annoying than in the first installment (whilst trying to figure out why my partner immediately offered, "because she has more lines") and Scarlett Johansson gets the award for striking the most poses during a formulaic fight sequence. As with most things he's been in recently, Mickey Rourke owned the film, though yet again I was waiting for something big to happen, a banal fight with drones and an all-too boring quick exit by Rourke just left me waiting for it to really get going. I just felt it was just a big old bowl of 'meh'.
Sostie
Cirque du Freak
A surprisingly good (cue lazy description) Burton-esque vampire tale. A very good cast indeed including Ken Watanabe as a wonky headed tall bloke, British hard man Ray Stevenson (who I was convinced was Craig Ferguson), Salma Hayek and her boobs that looked so big they should’ve got a billing and John C Reilly who is the lead vamp. I went in with no expectations and really enjoyed it. Good stuff

Get Him To The Greek
If you don’t like Russell Brand, don’t bother. I do, so I did. Jonah Hill I like more and more with each film I see him in. P Diddy, or whatever he’s called, was very good, especially in a scene with Pharrell Williams. Not the funniest film ever (the bit in the trailers that always made me laugh is not in the film) but funny enough to keep me watching.

The Hangover
Better the second time round.



QUOTE (Starscream`s Ghost @ Sep 24 2010, 05:06 PM) *
Where the Wild Things Are

Awful.


Yup! Sesame State more like.


QUOTE (Zoe @ Sep 26 2010, 11:54 PM) *
The Men who stare at Goats (2009)


Can't help thinking it would have been better with more Clooney dancing
Jon 79
QUOTE (Zoe @ Sep 27 2010, 11:54 AM) *
Funny, but I think I would have preferred a Jon Ronson documentary to this fictionalised account. Has anyone seen (or know where I can get hold of) the Kubrick's boxes doc he made?


It's on youtube.
fatseff1234
QUOTE (Rebus @ Sep 27 2010, 12:50 AM) *
Iron Man 2
Gwyneth Paltrow and Scarlett Johansson...


I'm sold.
dandan
extract - there he goes... johnny horsecock...

joel (jason bateman) is a self-made food extract magnate. despite this moderate success, he isn't happy: his relationship with his wife (kristen wiig) seems to have dissolved to the level of them simply being housemates and his employees are a little less than competent. still, he has his best friend dean (ben affleck) to give him less than good advice and ketamine. although that was an accident.

speaking of accidents, when step (clifton collins jr) - a floor manager wannabe - loses a nut, he decides against suing joel, but the influence of a charming, yet criminal drifter, cindy (mila kunis), means that joel has something else to deal with...

oh, i'd like to say that this is really great and a stunning return to form for mike judge, but it just isn't. at least, it's much better than 'idiocracy', although that isn't to hard to achieve.

basically, bateman is michael bluth and this is a sub-standard episode of 'arrested development', stretched out over eighty-five minutes. there are a couple of laughs and it is just about a watchable diversion. hardly glowing praise, but that is all it warrants. at least it is a little step, back in the right direction, although i'm not sure how much longer people are going to keep giving him money to make films.

another positive is the quite likeable ben affleck; not a phrase one often reads. his likeable quality is, however, overshadowed by the majesty of gene simmons; playing an ambulance chasing lawyer with incredible hair. he is the stealer of the show. oh, and another negative is the fact that i felt a little bit sick all the way through, as a result of frequent references to step's accident. ouch...

okay.
logger
Winter's Bone

Holy fuck!
maian
I never posted my full reviews of Winter's Bone and Enter The Void, but you can read them here and here.

I also watched Wild At Heart, which I haven't watched for about five years, as my first piece for hopelies.com. Here it is.
logger
I read your review of Winter's Bone after seeing it, I too couldn't help think of David Lynch as I watched it. Even though the actual style of film making is very different it does capture that Lynchian sense of inevitable dread so much that when Laura Palmer showed up I couldn't help think "but, of course".
melzilla
The Other Guys.

Some laugh out loud moments, but generally felt a bit unbalanced and confused rather than a proper action comedy. Enojyable enough, though, and Marky Mark was more watchable than normal. I never thought I'd say this, but I found myself wishing Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson (as well as Samuel L. Jackson) had been in it much more rather than just the first ten minutes.
maian
The Secret In Their Eyes (2009)

Argentinian film that won the Best Foreign Language Oscar last year. It tells the story of a retired detective who decides to write a novel about a case he investigated 25 years before, and in the process confronts the mistakes and tragedies that surrounded the case.

There's not a huge amount that's original in The Secret In Their Eyes, but it hits its beats so perfectly and unfolds so elegantly that it doesn't really matter. It's a really compelling mystery that never feels cliched or predictable, even as it treads on familiar ground. It's also a beautifully sad film about the memories that people hold on to and the way in which the past, or what we perceive the past to be, shapes our future.

I'm not sure that it deserved the Oscar over The White Ribbon - which I think is a much more ambitious film - but it is very, very good.
Sean of the Dead
Did you find that amazing shot - you know the one at the football stadium - utterly brilliant yet stylistically incongruous? I was impressed by it, but to suddenly go all shakey-cam and single-take felt so very jarring that it took me out of the film a little bit.
logger
Bandolero!

Jimmy Stewart saves brother Dean Martin and his outlaw gang from being hanged and joins them, along with hostage Raquel Welch, as they head through bandit country to freedom in Mexico, all the time with Sheriff George Kennedy in pursuit.

It's a good film but it's certainly no classic and whilst everything is handled professionally it does feel like it's been rushed. There's a lot going on but it's all skimmed over without going into any depth. You have the two brothers, both good men who have resorted to desperate measures to varying degrees. Miss Welch as the former whore now at the hands of men on the run and the tensions this brings within the gang. Kennedy in pursuit with an inadequate posse whilst holding a torch for their captive. All the while everybody is under threat of attacks from bandits. There is enough in the script to suggest that it could be remade into a much better film.

It also has Blue from Old School in a small role, he looks quite old even then.

It made me want to watch The Wild Bunch afterwards, so I did.
maian
QUOTE (Sean of the Dead @ Oct 2 2010, 03:48 PM) *
Did you find that amazing shot - you know the one at the football stadium - utterly brilliant yet stylistically incongruous? I was impressed by it, but to suddenly go all shakey-cam and single-take felt so very jarring that it took me out of the film a little bit.


I couldn't agree more. It was really brilliantly executed, but it looks like it was taken from an entirely different film. In fact, it reminded me of a lot of the stuff Gaspar Noe does in Enter The Void, and those are not two films that you'd otherwise find mentioned in the same breath. Except for when I do the answer phone message and work and list all the films we're showing, but that is really specific.
Zoe
Dogtooth (2009)

A mother and father keep their three adult children confined to their house and grounds and construct a reality just for them in which fish spontaneously appear in the pool, planes fall from the sky and land as toys, cats are to be feared as predators who especially like to feed on children's flesh and where children are not ready to leave home until their 'dogtooth' falls out. They also deliberately misinform them about language (the salt cellar is "the telephone" and the chair in their living room is "the sea"). The only outsider allowed into the compound is a girl the father employs to satisfy his son's sexual urges - though how he they came to this arrangement is never explained!

'Dogtooth' is a very unusual film, wonderfully odd and beautiful to look at. It reminded me a little of 'Mum and Dad', minus all the horror of course.

The idea of creating your own alternate universe is fascinating, and the parent's motive for deliberately cutting off their kids from reality and outside influence is never explained. Nor are the consequences of their daughter's burgeoning rebellion. It's deliberately ambiguous and all the more interesting for it.

I don't think I've ever seen a Greek film before.
dandan
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 2 2010, 11:03 PM) *
Dogtooth (2009)


my favourite film of 2009... simply brilliant: amazingly conceived and executed...

one audience i saw it with roared with laughter, the other sat in stony silence...
maian
The Women (1939)

Mrs. Stephen Haines (Mary) (Norma Shearer) is a happily married socialite who spends her days talking with her similarly happilly married socialite friends, or so she thinks. It turns out that here husband is having an affair with a shopgirl (Joan Crawford) and after her friend Mrs. Howard Fowler (Sylvia) (Rosalind Russell) tricks Mary into discovering this fact, the two find themselves pitting against each other for the affections of Mr. Stephen Haines.

Really very good, boasting a perfect cast of actresses who delight in the chance to deliver caustic, biting dialogue at a rapid-fire pace. In retrospect, it's also quite fascinating as an examination of sexual politics in the wake of first-wave feminism.

It's at its best in its opening act and in its final twenty minutes, since that is when most of the action happens and it happens very quickly, but even in its slower middle section the quality of the dialogue and the performances - particularly from Russell, who easily steals the film - prevents it from descending into torpid melodrama, instead remaining a fleet and engaging film that is always entertaining.
Ade
QUOTE (dandan @ Oct 3 2010, 12:23 AM) *
one audience i saw it with roared with laughter, the other sat in stony silence...

I observed the exact same reactions on the two occasions I saw The Exorcist at the cinema.
logger
Dawn of the Dead

Steve from Dawn of the Dead has now become Phil from Modern Family.

And Tucker is Osama Bin Laden in Pontypool.
dandan
tommy boy - hey, if you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it guaranteed, i will...

tommy boy (chris farley), after taking seven years to scrape through college, returns to take a job at his father's (brian dennehy) auto-parts factory. the thing is, tommy is a hapless idiot and, when his dad drops dead it's up to him to head out on the road with richard (david spade) - his father's miserable snippy assistant - and sell enough parts to keep the factory from being sold...

now, i remember this being an uproariously funny film, filled with giggles, but it has dated really badly. the delivery, timing and quality of most of the films gags are really bad, which is a shame. there are still two pretty funny, enjoyable bits though... carpenters and hair.

easily avoidable.


salt - salty, salty, catchy monkey...

salt (angelina jolie), a c.i.a. agent, is accused of being a russian spy by a defector, who is set to assassinate the presidents of russian and america. naturally, she goes on the run; but, is she a spy or a patriot? my god, that's such a lame under title for a film...

and, it's a really lame film. riding on the back of the 'bourne' films, it attempts to be all intelligent and inventive, but it fails and most of its "clever" set-ups resulted in me laughing out loud. as an unintentional comedy it worked very well; as a serious, hard-hitting, action packed and tense thriller, it totally fails.

crap.


superbad - sounds like a sexy hamburger...

seth (jonah hill), evan (michael cera) and fogell (christopher mintz-plasse) are three friends; unliked and existing on the fringes of high-school life. when fogel scores a fake i.d., the three find themselves getting invited to party by jules (emma stone) - a popular girl who seth has been flirting wildly with - oh, and becca (martha macisaac), who evan has a thing for is also going. it's all looking pretty good. that is, until fogell's fake i.d arrives: a hawaiian doner card, which makes him 25 and simply bears the name 'mclovin'. this might not end up being their evening after all...

err... my first involvement with the rogan /apatow production line. basically, it's just 'american pie', but with better writing and characterisation: it mixes the gross-out comedy, with some more subtle humour, physical and situational comedy and the tale of friendship between two best friends.

still, the biggest laugh for me came from when micheal cera ends a conversation with the girl he is uncomfortably flirting with by accidentally punching her in the boob. hilarious. more of a visual gag though, both in terms of the punch and the look on cera's face...

i would say that cera is the start of the film and the reason to watch. although the excellent stumbling fall from jonah hill (after a car reverses into him) is the second biggest comedy treat on offer.

it's a silly bit of fun and little more.
logger
QUOTE (dandan @ Oct 3 2010, 02:19 PM) *
salt - salty, salty, catchy monkey...

and, it's a really lame film. riding on the back of the 'bourne' films, it attempts to be all intelligent and inventive, but it fails and most of its "clever" set-ups resulted in me laughing out loud. as an unintentional comedy it worked very well; as a serious, hard-hitting, action packed and tense thriller, it totally fails.

I liked Salt pretty much for these reasons, although I'm not sure how unintentional any of it was. It reminded me of Brosnan-era Bond.
dandan
QUOTE (logger @ Oct 3 2010, 04:31 PM) *
I liked Salt pretty much for these reasons, although I'm not sure how unintentional any of it was. It reminded me of Brosnan-era Bond.


yeah, bronson-era bond was shit. absolutely fucking crap. when they were trying to be funny and self-referential they appeared lame and stupid, when they tried to be big, bold and brash, they just looked stupid, weak and they basically made some really, really crap films. for me, 'salt' attempted, as you said, to be 'the bourne regenderfication' (a phrase i like more than the bourne films or 'salt'); i think it was going for that vibe, without being as cold and technical as bourne films were in their execution of their "clever" bits. the 'bourne' films are passable. 'salt' gets a 'u'. however, that 'u' stands for unintentionally hilarious, unlike the 'u' i got for my a'levels...



the oxford murders - godel's incompleteness theorem...

martin (elijah wood) arrives in oxford to begin his phd, deliberately boarding in the house of mrs eagleton (anna massey), an old friend of arthur seldom (john hurt); a notable academic, whom martin wishes to work with on his research. after being rebuffed by seldom, martin feels stupid and wants to leave oxford, that is until he bumps into seldom outside his house, going inside to find mrs eagleton murdered. and so, the two begin to join forces, attempting to work out how a mathematical symbol, which was on a note seldom received informing that the murder would take place, could be the start of a mathematical sequence and a series of murders...

now, i like oxford, i like maths and i like alex de la iglesia. i have nothing against elijah wood or john hurt. err... what i will say is that the film looks pretty and oxford looks great in it. however, i'll also say that it is a big nasty mess, that seems very poorly conceived and executed. based on a book of the same name, which seems to have received overwhelmingly positive reviews, the film just seems wrong. scenes happen quickly, suggesting that the audience has been exposed to information which it hasn't, there is little sense of how much time is passing: does the film take place over three days, three weeks or three months? was there a longer cut and half an hour was snipped?

whatever happened, the film just doesn't really work. i recommend giving it a miss and watching 'the professor and his beloved equation' instead. it is both lovely and mathful.

this poor.
Zoe
Eden Lake (2008)

Not half as horrific as I was expecting, after all the hype, and very very Americanised for a British film.

The only truly horrifying moment was Thomas Turgoose's little face after he'd been stabbed

I guess it's about middle class fear of poor people, but I'm not too sure what it was trying to say about it.

Keep out of the Midlands m'duck.


She's out of my League (2010)


6/10, appropriately
Rebus
Harry Brown

Michael Caine's Gran Torino, except that rather than just tell damned kids to get off his lawn, Caine kicks some serious arse. He shows once again why he has been in the business for over half a century. I've enjoyed everything Caine's been in recently but it seems to have very much been a background "wise old geezer" role. Harry Brown gives him much more room to breathe, and he puts in a stunning performance. The loneliness and isolation of his situation is really borne out through his utterly convincing performance, he's so good you forget that he's Alfred or Carter or anyone in his portfolio.

Special mention has to go to the thugs he finds himself up against, there are some brilliant performances by many young actors in this, I just hope they're given more opportunities on screen in the future. It's very bleak, very depressing, but when reflecting what it's like to live on a London council estate, it couldn't have been anything else. My only criticism is of the character and not the actor, as I don't agree with him on his position on NI, and found his almost immediate willingness to start popping caps in asses slightly unrealistic.
Sostie
Jonah Hex
Disfigured bounty hunter who can talk to the dead (Josh Brolin) hunts down the man who killed his family and is now intent on destroying Washington (John Malkovich). Pretty forgettable comic adaptation that seemed to be either heavily cut or rushed for release – running time is about 80 minutes and the whole origin of Hex is told in a few minutes with photo and comic art montage.
Megan Fox plays a clichéd bad-ass whore. I was left wondering, is she actually a bankable film star? She’s pretty, get’s lots of coverage in magazines, yet, other than Transformers, which I doubt any of their success can be put down to her presence, she has not had a single Box Office hit. It also seemed that for some close-ups her face was CGI softened, like the old Vaseline on the lens of past.
On the plus side there are a few great looking shots and there should be more films with horse mounted Gattling guns, and there is the surprise casting of Michael Fassbender as a psycho Irish henchman (Will Arnett is also in there, but is so underused, you feel that perhaps he is further evidence that the film was heavily cut).

Predators
Not great, but not bad. I enjoyed the versus Aliens films more

30 Days Of Night: Dark Days
Adaptation of the comic book sequel. After surviving the incidents in Barrow in the first film, Stella (now played by Kiele Sanchez) goes to LA to track down the vampire leader. Like Blade Trinity but without the budget, fun or Ryan Reynolds’ bod.




QUOTE (Rebus @ Oct 4 2010, 12:10 AM) *
Harry Brown

Special mention has to go to the thugs he finds himself up against, there are some brilliant performances by many young actors in this,


Including Plan B as the "head thug"
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