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Serafina_Pekkala
I was going to see Salt but didn't - Astrid told was rubbs so didn't. 5 minutes of Herr Diehl is not worth my pennies. I can wait for Youtube to ogle.

I can only call the movie Coat

QUOTE (dandan @ Oct 3 2010, 07:04 PM) *
yeah, bronson-era bond was shit.


Bronson. huhuh.

I was actually quite amazed how shit they are looking back. But sometimes - I don't mind the shitness. Reading 'Goldfinger' (as I am doing now) you realise that Craig is actually the closest to Bond in spirit in a lot of ways. But he looked more like Dalton. I just think of Don Draper.

Sostie
I really enjoyed Salt.
Serafina_Pekkala
I'll wait for the DVD.

QUOTE
Michael Fassbender as a psycho Irish henchman


He never disappoints. Lovely Fassbender.

Funny you should mention about Foxy Megan. She really knows how to spin her image rather than being famous for film. And they shouldn't have to airbrush her face now - she is only 23. I don't mind her.

She is also the proof that 'loose 30 pounds and have a minor nosejob' is the key to Hollywood success these days. Same for Angie and Halle.
grumpygit
Back to the Future.

Great Scott!
Zoe
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Oct 4 2010, 11:23 AM) *
He never disappoints. Lovely Fassbender.


He was VERY annoying in Eden Lake.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 4 2010, 11:45 AM) *
He was VERY annoying in Eden Lake.


I've not seen that. Oh well. I guess you can't depend on him after all. Just the thing to end a Monday morning.

I hope he got his kit off to make up for the annoyment.
Zoe
Awwww, I'm sure he wouldn't annoy you. Never fear!

He is topless a lot.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 4 2010, 11:58 AM) *
He is topless a lot.


I feel better now.
Ade
Dean Spanley

"Rum chap, that Spanley - not quite sound."

I found this charming little film doubly effecting this time - funny and touching, with a great turn from Peter O'Toole (more than ably supported by Jeremy Northam, Sam Neill and Bryan Brown).

Set in Edwardian England after the Boer War, this gem of a film is propelled by some wonderfully prosaic dialogue. Narrated throughout by Fisk Jr. (Northam), whose weekly ritual visit to his stubbornly close-minded father (O'Toole) opens the proceedings, before focussing on Fisk Jr's subsequent encounters with the titular Dean (Neill). Brown's collonial 'conveyancer' provides much of the film's lighter-hearted moments, his character providing the means by which Dean Spanley's, shall we say, peculiarities - are revealed (I won't divulge anything further on this, save spoiling it). Sam Neill's performance here is thoroughly absorbing, an unusual, entertainingly quirky role quite different to what one would normally expect from him.

But it's O'Toole's brusque patriarch that is the highlight; an amusingly blinkered old fool whose steadfast beliefs (refusal to mourn the loss of his other son in the Boer conflict, for one) reveal a few chinks in the armour before the credits roll - it's a wonderful reveal. Had me choking back tears by the end (one of the latter father-son moments did rather catch me off guard this time).

Might not be everyone's cup of tea, this, given the period setting and the mode of speech, but I enjoyed this delightful little tale all the more second time round. Can't recommend it enough.
Sostie
Exit Through The Gift Shop
The film about a documentary film maker who films street artists and in turn becomes an artist and the subject of a documentary film by another artist! A totaly enjoyable and engrossing film from start to finish. Of course your enjoyment of this will be increased if you actually like "street art" or the process of presenting/promoting/hyping art.
Would make a great triple bill with Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Great Rock'n'Roll Swindle.
maian
The American

George Clooney, in Serious Acting Mode, plays a mysterious hitman (named Jack, or possibly Edward, or possibly Mister Butterfly) who, after a botched attempt to kill him in Sweden, moves to a small town in Italy to lay low. Whilst there, he gets offered a job to build a very specific rifle for a woman named Matilda (Thelka Reuten) so that she can carry out a hit. As he works on the rifle, Clooney spends his days wandering the village, talking to a local priest (Paolo Bonacelli) and falling in love with a prostitute (Violante Placido)

There are flashes of something really special in The American; Anton Corbijn's direction gives the film a slow, luxurious quality that makes the film feel like a lost (and very straightforward) Antonioni film, it's beautifully shot and Clooney, in a performance that is more often than not silent, is great at portraying "Jack's" sense of ennui. However, the film doesn't maintain those moments of greatness for its running time. It's a film that wants to be about the effect that guilt has on a man's conscience, yet it's too superficial to convey that in any other way than having the priest say it to "Jack" at one point. It's a film built around anti-climaxes, in which scenes are meant to build to a point of great tension then fizzle out (which, when done well, as in any given episode of The Sopranos, can be spellbinding), which doesn't have a grasp of how to build that tension in the first place.

By no means a terrible film, but frustrating because it's all too easy to see how it could have been a really good film.
Raven
My first cinema visit since Star Trek last year:

Back to the Future

Excellent! (boy did that lightning make a bang!).

Still enjoyable for so many reasons, but one of my favourite moments has to be the best chat up line in cinema history: "You are my density" - great stuff!

Watching it on a large screen again for the first time in a decade or so made me realise just how much Christopher Lloyd's eye move around. Disturbing.
Zoe
Funny People (2009)

I watched it with my housemate, who's a comedian as are most of her friends, and she didn't know whether to find it funny or tragic. I suspect that's a compliment as there are certainly some recognisable character traits of people in the profession

It suffers from all the flaws of Judd Apatow films; it's too long, it self indulgently includes all his friends and family, and sentimentality mixed with crassness doesn't always work. But, overall, I enjoyed it. I laughed out loud a few times "I thought everybody loved you" and I was occasionally even a little moved.

The highlights were some of the cameos, especially a brilliant Eminem, the fake movies (I loved the 'My Best Friend's a Robot' poster) and the title of the sitcom 'Yo Teach!'.

Three stars I'd say - though Eric Bana nearly deserves a fourth on his own.
maian
Bana rescues the entire third act, which for me nearly ruined the whole thing. It's tantamount to admitting that he didn't know how to finish the film, so he grafted on a second film.

Catch Me If You Can

As discussed on Twitter, my fourth favourite Spielberg movie.

The Town

Doug MacRay (Ben Affleck) is part of a crew of bank robbers who operate out of the Charlestown area of Boston, a section of the city which, according to the (possibly bullshit) text that opens the film, produces more bank robbers than any other place in the world. During the course of their latest job, his impulsive and borderline sociopathic friend James (Jeremy Renner) takes the bank manager (Rebecca Hall) hostage. After letting her go, James has second thoughts, and wonders if she might have seen something and if they will have to kill her to tie off all the loose ends. Doug doesn't want anyone to get hurt, so he befriends her in order to find out what she knows, but quickly finds himself falling for her. Meanwhile, a cartoon pilot FBI agent (Jon Hamm) investigates the robbery and tries to find out who was responsible.

Largely due to its origins as a fairly average Chuck Hogan crime novel named Prince of Thieves, there is little in The Town that anyone who has seen any number of crime films - or anyone who has just seen Heat - won't have seen before. However, it distinguishes itself with a stellar cast, which also features Pete Postlethwaite, Chris Cooper and Titus Fucking Welliver in supporting roles, and an offbeat sense of humour. Affleck, who also directed and co-wrote the film, is a charming and engaging lead who has an immense chemistry with Hall that adds substance to a relationship that could easily have felt like nothing more than a plot device with the wrong actors or a less sympathetic directorial style.

Equal to, if not greater than, Affleck's chemistry with Hall is Affleck's chemistry with Renner. The hurdle that almost all heist films face is the contradiction that exists between the narrative need for a sociopath to create tension within the crew and eventually derail the whole operation, and the fact that if the robbers are as professional as the film claims they wouldn't work with a sociopath who creates tension within the crew and will eventually derail the whole operation. The Town gives due time to developing the lifelong friendship between Doug and James that keeps them working together, even though Doug understands all too well that James is going off the rails. The two actors give the friendship a sense of history through both big and small gestures, be they the way they greet each other, or the way that James, when asked by Doug if he could help him "hurt somebody," asks no questions besides, "Whose car are we taking?" Renner brings a boiling intensity to James that makes him a really magnetic presence, whether he's shooting up a cop car or shooting the shit with this friends, and makes him more interesting than the stock character that he is.

There's no single sequence in the film as indelible as the barroom confrontation in Affleck's first feature, Gone Baby, Gone, though a chase scene through the back streets of Boston is pretty wonderful, but as a whole it's a much stronger film, one that is tense, sleek and charming, in so much as a film that has someone get their head bashed in with a rifle in the opening five minutes can be charming.
Zoe
QUOTE (maian @ Oct 6 2010, 03:17 AM) *
Bana rescues the entire third act, which for me nearly ruined the whole thing. It's tantamount to admitting that he didn't know how to finish the film, so he grafted on a second film.


An identical criticism can be leveled at The 40 Year Old Virgin, but I didn't find it as jarring this time. Probably because of Bana.
logger
I liked the Kramer joke but the rest was pretty rubbish. Speaking of which...

Natural Born Killers

I only ended up watching it out of nostalgia. Stone is clearly out of his depth with the script and visually it's like watching a kid play with toys that they don't understand or deserve and the end result is like watching crappy music videos from 1993.

I still think it could have been a good film and maybe it could be remade once everyone stops being scared of terrorists. And the "If I was a serial killer I'd be Mickey and Mallory" is a great line.
widowspider
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 5 2010, 11:43 PM) *
Funny People (2009)

I watched it with my housemate, who's a comedian as are most of her friends, and she didn't know whether to find it funny or tragic. I suspect that's a compliment as there are certainly some recognisable character traits of people in the profession

It suffers from all the flaws of Judd Apatow films; it's too long, it self indulgently includes all his friends and family, and sentimentality mixed with crassness doesn't always work. But, overall, I enjoyed it. I laughed out loud a few times "I thought everybody loved you" and I was occasionally even a little moved.

The highlights were some of the cameos, especially a brilliant Eminem, the fake movies (I loved the 'My Best Friend's a Robot' poster) and the title of the sitcom 'Yo Teach!'.

Three stars I'd say - though Eric Bana nearly deserves a fourth on his own.

Bana was truly stupendous.
Rebus
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 6 2010, 09:43 AM) *
Three stars I'd say - though Eric Bana nearly deserves a fourth on his own.


Yeah Bana comes from a great comedy stock, having spent a long time on the circuit in the 90s. Full Frontal was an awesome show and you really have to see The Castle to see him at his comedic best. He really needs to do more comedy. In fact, might give my Castle DVD a whirl this weekend.
sleeping_pirate
Saw Cyrus on the plane over. Wasn't as awful as I thought it'd be, but I wouldn't go out of my way to watch it again. Jonah Hill was very good in it though.
maian
F For Fake (1974)

The last film to be completed by Orson Welles uses the story of Elmyr de Hory, a man who made a very lucrative career out of art forgery, selling hundreds of paintings to galleries and passing them off as authentic works of the likes of Matisse and Monet, to investigate notions of authorship, authenticity and art. Welles and his contributors repeatedly ask whether or not something that is a beautiful fake can still be considered a work of art if people believe that it is real.

Digressive and slippery, Welles uses avant-garde editing to construct a thoughtful examination of some very elusive themes. An entertaining and tricksy film that is worth watching, particularly if, like me, you're happy to listen to Welles' lugubrious tones for an hour and a half.

Grey Gardens (1975)

The Maysles Brother's cult documentary about Edith and Edie Beale, the aunt and cousin of Jackie Onassis who spent fifty years between them living in poverty and squalor in the formerly splendid Grey Gardens mansion is a film that walks the finely between "interesting" and "fascinating." Consisting solely of footage of the two women telling stories, singing and dancing in their home with little context and no narration to make sense of their lives, the events of the film are pretty mundane and, on the surface, pretty dull.

But the film is not meant to be a dynamic piece of narrative cinema, but an immersion into the lives of two women who have so completely cut themselves off from the world, and the often poisonous co-dependent relationship that exists between them. Using their cinema verite techniques, the Maysles' give the two women ample opportunity to present themselves to the audience, and whilst the film occasionally feels queasily voyeuristic and exploitative, there is a sense that the women are performing for the camera and, in doing so, revealing a great deal about the shattered dreams and lost lives that have taken them from being socialites who dined with Presidents to living in an old, dilapidated house.

A great character study that will not be for everyone, my sister had to stop watching after half an hour because the constant bickering and digressions got too much for her, but if you can get past the shrillness it's a rewarding experience.
dandan
QUOTE (maian @ Oct 6 2010, 10:17 PM) *
Grey Gardens (1975)


thanks... i'd forgotten that i needed to watch this... well reminded... by accident...
Zoe
Repo Men (2009)

Balls

The script is awful, especially Jude Law's narration. They even make a brief gag at the expense of how shallow and stupid his ramblings are, but it's nowhere funny enough to justify the hour and forty minutes we've had to suffer to get there.

The plot is unoriginal, and its execution is entirely without wit, verve or invention. It also make NO SENSE; the central premise, the core narrative, any twists or turns, the denouement, even the basics are stupid and contradictory. It's like someone trying to describe the story of Robocop to you when they're drunk and getting confused, so they start flitting between the narratives of Total Recall, Blade Runner, Minority Report, The Six Million Dollar Man and Crash - until you punch them.

It's stupid, boring and dull. It has one decent action sequence, but Chloe Moretz is more convincing at killing guys in corridors than Jude Law.

After the (semi) decent action sequence there follows a piece of gore/erotica which is the most bafflingly icky thing I've ever seen. ESPECIALLY after the stupid stupid ending manages to make it make even LESS SENSE!

The acting is balls, the music is balls, the special effects are balls. It's balls.

Balls.
maian
The Social Network

"Every creation myth needs a devil."

Since its humble beginnings as a site allowing Harvard students to share information, Facebook has grown exponentially to become not only one of the most popular websites in the world, but also a key part of the fabric of everyday life for many of its 500 million users. The site has rarely been free of controversy, with many pointing to its potential for stalkerish voyeurism and the vaguely insiduous ways in which it gathers together the information of those that use it.

Given that Facebook is a somewhat creepy place fueled by its users' own jealousy, obsession, alienation and feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, though perhaps I might be projecting there, it's only appropriate that The Social Network, the film that purports to tell the story of how the site was founded and the emotional and legal fallout that ensued, is a relentlessly creepy movie fueled by the negative emotions of Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), who co-founded Facebook with several of his friends whilst still a college student.

After getting spectacularly dumped by his girlfriend, Zuckerberg gets drunk and creates a site called "FaceMash" which allows Harvard students to compare women in their classes and say who is more attractive. The site is an instant success - and gets Zuckerberg into a whole lot of trouble - and leads Zuckerberg to develop an expanded version of the site, using money from his friend Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield) to finance it.

From very early on, we know that things don't work out well for Zuckerberg and Saverin, at least in terms of their friendship. The story unfolds through testimony at several lawsuits filed against Zuckerberg - one from Saverin, one from a pair of rich twins (Armie Hammer) who say that they gave Zuckerberg the idea - and the film becomes about the way in which Zuckerberg, whilst becoming the centre of a company built on social interaction, became increasingly isolated and alone. It's Citizen Kane with laptops.

Director David Fincher gives the film a verve and energy that a story about programming and lawsuits has no right to have. The moody, subdued visuals of the film, perfectly complimented by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross' sinister score, convey just the right amount of importance to make the story feel relevant, yet it never feels suffocatingly portentous. Every scene flows seamlessly into the next with nary a wasted second, and his crisp editing makes the two-hours fly by without ever feeling as if the film is outpacing its own information.

It helps that Fincher has found an unusual sparring partner in writer Aaron Sorkin, whose status updates are no doubt hilarious, slightly sappy and breathlessly wordy. Sorkin brings his signature verbosity to the story, delivering a script built around loping monologues, rapid fire back-and-forth and technical jargon woven seamlessly into the fabric of the story. One of Sorkin's great skills, one which he honed over four years of almost single-handedly writing The West Wing, has always been his ability to make even the most complex, specialised concepts accessible and interesting. You could go into The Social Network knowing nothing of coding or legal matters (I certainly know little about either) and still be riveted by the relentless storytelling.

You'd also have a good time laughing at the frequently hilarious dialogue. This is a very funny movie with more jokes - and smarter jokes - than you'll find in most straight comedies released this year.

The film missteps slightly in its attempt to say that Zuckerberg was driven by his love for a girl, in doing so reducing a complicated and contradictory person - who is, as the film keeps reminding us, a bit of an asshole - into a lovesick kid, but that happens so late in the game that it doesn't affect the film too much.

Completing the set is a talented cast who are capable of keeping up with Sorkin's exhausting dialogue and are able to match Fincher's seriousness. Jesse Eisenberg should finally silence all those Michael Cera comparisons with his darkly humourous, arrogant take on Eisenberg. He fully explores the idea that Zuckerberg's desire to create Facebook was driven more by his feelings of envy and a desire to fit in with the popular kids, creating someone who is often repugnant but never less than fascinating. The film doesn't really have a hero, but Eduardo Saverin is the closest thing it has and Andrew Garfield captures Saverin's naivety and increasingly feeling of being lost in the college scenes, as well as his steely resolve and bitter hatred in the legal discussions.

Justin Timberlake also puts in a great performance as Napster founder Sean Parker, who he imbues with a popstar magnetism that makes Zuckerberg's infatuation with him, to the detriment of his relationship with Saverin, feel only natural. If Timberlake's going to get the O in his EGOT, this is his best chance.

The Social Network is a film that is more than the sum of its parts, and its parts are pretty spectacular to begin with. It's a furiously intelligent, entertaining piece of cinema full of indelible performances and pacing that most action films would kill for. A shockingly great film.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (maian @ Oct 6 2010, 10:17 PM) *
Grey Gardens (1975)


It's amazing - especially if you stumble across it one night, on Channel 4 when aged about 14. I had some very peculiar dreams after that. Usually about wearing a jumper on your head and piles of rotting magazines.
logger
Hot Tub Time Machine

It's still enjoyable but it didn't seem as good this time round, I think it's because I had such low expectations first time.
Zoe
The House Bunny (2008)

Actually pretty funny. There's a surprise.
logger
Dream Thieves wink.gif Naughty, fuzzy edition

1, I would say that if you haven't seen this already then don't watch this version, wait for the dvd. 2, that has to be the best film-score of the year, it's so dramatic.

QUOTE (maian @ Oct 7 2010, 04:26 AM) *
The Social Network

It's Citizen Kane with laptops.

Would you say it's by far Fincher's best film?

Apart from the great reviews it's getting it really isn't something I can get excited about. The trailer made it look like Oscar bait, entrepreneur porn mixed with the internet is serious business meme.
maian
I think Zodiac is a better film, but The Social Network is much more entertaining. Easily my second favourite of his.
Zoe
I love Zodiac and found it very entertaining, but Fight Club just strikes me as more important, cinematically.

It would have to be my number one, I've certainly seen it more times. Even if it is a more obvious/less cool choice.

Hey, at least I didn't say Seven.
maian
I've always found Fight Club to be pretty hollow. Not terrible, but I don't really care about anything that happens in it and the ideas in the film don't resonate with me. I'd still probably put it at number three on my list of his films because it is very well made and the performances are great.

I like Se7en, silly, silly spelling aside. Number four with a bullet (or a head in a box).
logger
Seven
Panic Room
Zodiac
Don't care
Zoe
The Social Network (2010)

Zoe likes this.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 8 2010, 01:36 AM) *
I love Zodiac and found it very entertaining, but Fight Club just strikes me as more important, cinematically.


Zodiac for me. Just because I enjoyed it more. But FC is a more influential film. I also like 'The Game' - as it is very underated and but I like any cool mystery film set in San Francisco really.

Have you seen David Fincher lately? He is turning into a cross between Sostie and Craig. Sosaig (which also sounds like a single malt).
Zoe
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Oct 11 2010, 10:25 AM) *
Zodiac for me. Just because I enjoyed it more. But FC is a more influential film. I also like 'The Game' - as it is very underated and but I like any cool mystery film set in San Francisco really.


I agree with all of the above.

'The Social Network' really is brilliant. I can't remember the last time a film ended and I was really gutted 1) because it felt less than its running time and 2) because it was so interesting and entertaining I could have watched it for at least another hour.

Probably 'Zodiac'

Fincher is very very good at this 'inspired by real events' malarkey.
Ade
Great to hear all the positive vibe on The Social Network - I'm really looking forward to seeing it this week, especially after the mildly disappointing Benjamin Button (which I enjoyed immensely, but just lacked that something that Zodiac and Fight Club have).
Zoe
The twins blew my mind. I thought they were really twins!
logger
Armond Hammer? arf

My favourite review for Social Network so far was that it's Scarface for nerds.
maian
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 11 2010, 09:58 AM) *
The twins blew my mind. I thought they were really twins!


I did as well! It's some really great CGI, which is a weird thing to say considering the kind of film it is. He also has my favourite line in the film:

Wait, I can. I'm 6'5, 220 pounds and there are two of me.
maian
Mother (2009)

Finally managed to see Bong Joon-Ho's tale of a mother whose only son is arrested for murder, and the lengths she will go to in order to save him. For the first three-quarters I was enjoying it, but felt it was a bit unoriginal (particularly considering Bong's previous work) and felt like a just-okay episode of Veronica Mars. But the last half an hour really turned the film around for me, delivering a genuinely interesting plot twist that changed the nature of the film in a profound way. Even up until that point, the film was delivered with a wit and energy that was hard to fault, but until the last half an hour I was struggling to see why it's been getting quite the acclaim that it has.

Stagecoach (1939)

Weird to think that there was a time when John Wayne wouldn't have been the headliner of a film, or that he would have to be "introduced" to the world, but apparently there was and this was the film to introduce him. His first collaboration with John Ford finds Wayne playing The Ringo Kid, a wanted murderer who finds himself thrown together with a disparate group of travellers (a sheriff, a prostitute, a gambler, a drunken doctor, a liquor salesmen, a soldier's wife) as they travel through Apache company. Its mixture of humour, thrilling action and swooning romanticism would do a lot to shape not only Wayne and Ford's later collaborations, but the Western genre as a whole. Rather than being a stuffy piece interesting only to cinephiles, it's still a really fun and surprising film.

The Social Network

Enjoyed it just as much the second time around, but I found the ending a little unsatisfying without the initial rush of watching the film for the first time. It's not a bad ending, by any means, but not quite on a par with the rest of the film.
sweetbutinsane
The Hole

It seemed so promising, but then the ending was rubbish.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (maian @ Oct 11 2010, 07:53 PM) *
Mother (2009)


I was confusing this with the one where Daniel Craig is a builder and ends up banging the mature lady from Dinnerladies. Not Mavis from Corrie. That is a strange watch.

The Illusionist- no Edward Norton in dark beard included.

Thin story but beautifully drawn and perfectly captures the atmosphere of autumnal Scotland. Just very very sad. Old magician in 1950s cannot find a place in the increasingly alien world. He travels to Scotland, meets a curious wee Gaelic-speaking girl with a mercenary streak and tries to make ends meet. I liked it but it also left me feeling quite depressed. Nobody wants to see a ventriloquist's dummy alone in a shop like that. But the lighter moments were the best and most magical - like the drunk man in the kilt who pops up now and again (an absolute joy). I will never look at the bunnies on Arthur's Seat in the same way. Also - very weird. I saw it in the cinema that features in the film (the Tati film). It is very cool to see your exact location on film - animated! In fact, all the locations a based on real life and a great treat for locals.

Police, Adjective
Acclaimed Romanian 'drama' - i use that term loosely because I have to admit this is one of the most mundane and boring films i have ever seen. Cop thinks a kid may deal hash. But he doesn't know so he just follows him everywhere. Then writes this down and reads it for the audience. Then tells this to his superiors and recounts this to the audience. Sometimes he talks with his wife about grammar. Other times he just makes and eats soup. For 2 hours at least. Yeah - you can imagine how thrilling that is. And it is all set in a really dreadful town somewhere that looks like a horrid council estate in Maryhill or Bootle circa 1982.

There is only one stand-out scene when the cop (who looks like my friends hubby - one of the only redeeming things for me) is trying to eat his tea but his wife insists on playing this hideous turgid love song on Youtube. Apparently this movie won loads of awards - which, makes me believe even more that film critics are another species of person.
empathy-with-beast
QUOTE (Zoe @ Oct 8 2010, 01:36 AM) *
I love Zodiac and found it very entertaining, but Fight Club just strikes me as more important, cinematically.


I agree and would go further. I felt the Zeitgeist shift around me as I watched that film for the first time. Did I ever tell you about when I first went to see it and when I came out I noticed there were loads of men with facial inhuries in the audience. The later as I walked up Charing Cross Road I saw two men fighting on the floor as another group of men stood around and watched.
logger
What's the first thing they do when they start up their anarchist organisation? The fucking rules.

It made fighting gay.
Zoe
Fighting's always been gay. Ooooooo punch me
dandan
all i felt when i watched 'fight club' for the first time, having known nothing about, was my interest and enjoyment of the initial third of the film, transforming to cringes of embarrassment at just how awful it became in the final third...
Serafina_Pekkala
And you see him in the beginning in millisecond flash. Spooky cakes.

QUOTE
Fighting's always been gay. Ooooooo punch me


So true.
logger
QUOTE (dandan @ Oct 12 2010, 01:28 PM) *
all i felt when i watched 'fight club' for the first time, having known nothing about, was my interest and enjoyment of the initial third of the film, transforming to cringes of embarrassment at just how awful it became in the final third...

I've always said that it would be a much better film if Tyler Durden never showed up. The relationship between Norton's and HBC's nowhere people characters was the most interesting part.
NiteFall
I lump Fight Club in with The Matrix and Donnie Darko- horribly stupid pretentious films that desperately try to pass themselves off as clever and deep.
Zoe
Undertow (2009)

The tale of a fisherman, who falls in love with a painter, despite a pregnant wife and a less than understanding community. The supernatural enters early and there's strong shades of 'Ghost' and 'Truly Madly Deeply' in the plot; but 'Undertow' is considerably more subtle and less mawkish than either.

This is a film about love and what it is to be a real man.

My only quibble would be why gay love stories have to be so uniformly tragic on screen. However, in terms of LGBT cinema I'd say it's significant in the strength of its protagonists and the non-sensational portrayal of their romance.

Good Hair (2009)

Entertaining enough as a documentary, but there's nothing very cinematic about it. I would presume I'm not the target audience, as it seemed less about teaching the uneducated about the mysteries of black women's hair (I had never heard the phrase 'nappy' before) and more about making those already embroiled in this pursuit of 'good hair' think, or laugh about their obsession.

Lots of interesting stuff, including hair styling battles on a mammoth scale, plenty of shocking stats about the cost for individual women.of this multi-million dollar industry and what 'relaxers' actually do to your hair (or an aluminum can)

I did find the idea of buying one's hair wholesale from India a little upsetting. Especially when it was in huge sacks (a suitcase full is worth 18 grand).

It seemed frustratingly reluctant to come to any kind of conclusion about why black women spend so much money on straightening, or replacing, their hair.

Though in the end it's not as if this is skin bleaching, and what makes you feel good is probably good hair.
Rebus
Four Lions

Finally got around to seeing this, thoroughly enjoyed it, I wouldn't have expected writing of any other caliber from Morris. Kevin Eldon and Darren Boyd's argument about what constitutes a bear was simply hilarious. Looking forward to seeing how many people it pisses off when it's released in the US, I think Beck's fat face might actually explode.
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