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fatseff1234
Scott Pilgrim Vs The World.

Purest of awesome. Awesome, more awesome then suitably more awesome.

Best film evarrr!

EDIT: EVARRRRRRR!
Raven
QUOTE (dandan @ Jan 5 2011, 08:35 PM) *
scott pilgrim vs. the world - hyperbole...

scott pigrim (micheal cera) plays bass in some band with his mates, he's kinda dating a high school girl, knives chau (ellen wong), but soon finds himself falling for ramona flowers (mary elizabeth winstead). any how, this falling results in challenges from ramona's seven evil exes, whom scott must defeat in order to win her heart...

i really had no desire to watch this, but i caved in as it was december and everything is available for download, if there's even the remote chance it could be in line for some kind of oscar nomination. to be honest, i kinda wish i hadn't bothered. as much as i enjoyed 'spaced', with each return, mr wright's light appears to be diminishing, which is rather sad. i tried to pay attention, but it wasn't too long before i found myself picking up a sudoku book and giving that half of my attention.

anyway, it kinda just rubbed me up the wrong way a little and, although cera was fine, schwartzman was present and there were a couple of good laughs early on, this is a very forgettable film and one which i shall devote no more time to.

okay, i guess...



QUOTE (fatseff1234 @ Jan 5 2011, 11:51 PM) *
Scott Pilgrim Vs The World.

Purest of awesome. Awesome, more awesome then suitably more awesome.

Best film evarrr!

EDIT: EVARRRRRRR!


Good to know we have a range of opinion on here!
GundamGuy_UK
I lean more towards fatseff, though it's hardly the best film ever. At the risk of sounding like a pretentious knob by spurting out a cliché, the book is better.
The movie is great, and it was the first I saw of Scott Pilgrim. But it obviously has to remove and change a lot of stuff, and it's good stuff too.
logger
I loved Scott Pilgrim, thought the Special Network was retarded and haven't seen Redline.
fatseff1234
Ok, so I might have been on a post-film high but you know, it was good.

I agree about the books being better and the amount of content loss/moved around and the fact that the film was only an hour and forty seven minutes started me worrying early on but it came together nicely.

I liked how they got the quirkyness of the books across and the general personalities of each character were portrayed very well too.

I'd've loved to have seen the legendary birthday cake scene or the whole casual sex fiascos on screen though happy.gif.

Evarrr!

sweetbutinsane
Sherlock Holmes

I still absolutely love this film. The 16th of December is just so far away...

"Get that out of my face."
"It's not in your face, it's in my hand."
"Get what's in your hand out of my face."

happy.gif
maian
I visited my sister at her new flat in Salford so we spent the evening watching films.

Exit Through The Gift Shop

Even better than the first time. One of the most purely enjoyable films of the last year. Banksy, in particular, has a dry sense of humour that is hysterical to me.

In The Loop

Still great.

Zombieland

Not as much fun as the first time around. The best bit is still the moment when, after delivering a dramatic speech, Jesse Eisenberg crashes his motorcycle. Hilariously pathetic.

The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters

Gets better and better.
logger
Goonies

Why do they always put it on at a time where it has to be cut?
logger
Inception

Eames and Arthur are totally hot for each other.
maian
Exit Through The Gift Shop again. I love showing it to people who don't know anything about it. It's just such a fun film and sparks some really interesting conversations.
sleeping_pirate
QUOTE (maian @ Jan 7 2011, 08:42 PM) *
Zombieland

Not as much fun as the first time around.

I agree, when I saw it at the cinema I came out thinking that it was absolutely hilarious. When we watched it again on DVD I just thought it was quite funny. I think the surprise of actually enjoying it made me laugh even more the first time round.
Zoe
How to Train your Dragon (2010)

Great stuff - It reminded me a lot of Lilo & Stitch.

I particularly liked all the different types of dragons and their designs. I can imagine little boys absolutely loving it.

Interesting comment on disability too - which is unusual in a children's film.
sweetbutinsane
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang
Utterly crazy, but very funny (nearly spat wine all over my bed at one point) and enjoyable.

Cronos
Pretty good. Didn't like when he was peeling his skin off, though. Bleh.
maian
True Grit (1969)

I'm pretty sure that I saw this when I was little - I've always been a fan of Westerns and this is a favourite of my Dad's, so I don't imagine why I wouldn't have seen it - but couldn't really remember anything of it. Having read Charles Portis' novel in preparation for the Coen Brothers' version, I thought it was time to revisit it so I can properly judge if their version is, as they keep saying, more faithful to Portis' vision than Henry Hathaway's.

In short, it'd have to be, because as an adaptation True Grit is pretty terrible. That's not to say that it is a bad film, it really isn't. It's a fun Western with an above average script and a great central performance from Wayne as Deputy Marshal Reuben "Rooster" J. Cogburn. But it misses the point entirely when it comes to putting Portis' novel on screen. It's simultaneously more sombre and lighter, in that the offbeat humour that runs throughout the book, yet it also removes much of the Biblical themes of retribution. It also doesn't bother to flesh out its supporting cast, squandering both the rich world of Portis' novel and a young Robert Duvall as Lucky Ned Pepper.

The main difference lies in the focus of the film. The film is entirely from Hattie Ross' perspective, since she is recounting it as an old woman looking back on a particularly eventful time in her youth, with Cogburn being a major but, crucially, supporting character. He's no more important to the story than LaBeef, even if he is the man that Hattie seeks out for help. The film is much more about Cogburn, who it softens considerably in order to play to Wayne's strengths. But this is also to the detriment of the character of Hattie, who is one of the most fascinating characters in genre fiction in the book but a near total bore on screen. That's largely due to Kim Darby, who can't convey the mix of childish ire and Presbyterian haughtiness that makes her doggedness so compelling. The best way I can describe it is that the book is like His Dark Materials, in that it is the story of a child who is helped by adults but who remains thoughout the centre of the story, whereas the film is like Star Wars, in that the story is meant to be Luke's but everyone is really interested in Han.

Whilst I do think that the film is great, if pretty terribly dated when it comes to action scenes, but having watched it I have higher hopes for the Coen Brothers' version, if only because the story and tone of the novel are far better suited to their sensibilities.
Julie
I watched The Switch on the flight from NZ to LA.

Utter, utter shit. Makes me feel very sad for Bateman.
maian
The Men Who Stare At Goats was pretty diverting but not much else. It's best in its first half when it seems committed solely to showing the absurdities of the experiments, but once it tries to turn it into a vaguely political comment on the use of torture and the madness of War it completely loses its funny, expecting us to care about characters that it has spent no time setting up as anything other then joke machines. A full embrace of absurdism or a greater commitment to making the characters feel like real people would have made it a much better film, but in the end it's half a good comedy, half an uninteresting drama.
fatseff1234
Run Fatboy Run.

Was good.
sleeping_pirate
The King's Speech

Absolutely loved this film. Went in to the cinema thinking it could be just another dry, stuffy British film about royal life, but it was actually very touching and funny. Geoffrey Rush and Colin Firth are great together, but for me it is definitely Firth that stands out most. His performance is incredible and you find yourself willing him to overcome his stammer throughout.

Can't wait for it to come out on DVD.
Sostie
RED
Not nearly as bad as the reviews led me to believe. Really enjoyed it. Mary-Louise Parker is great in it

Social Network
Most excellent.

Piranha
Lots of unlikeable people being killed in gory glory. Good fun

Dinner For Schmucks
Despite owning it for years I have yet to see the French original so I can’t really compare. It’s OK. Few, if any laugh out loud moments despite a top comedy cast.

Indiana Jones & The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skulls
Jurassic Park 2
War Of The Worlds

They may be “lesser” Spielbergs, but they all contain moments of brilliance. Well maybe not so much Indy, but it does have a few well executed action sequences.

Sherlock Holmes
Stands up well to repeated viewings. Probably my favourite “blockbuster” for some years. Certainly Jude Law’s finest hour

Land Of The Lost
My second favourite Will Ferrell film after Anchorman. Very underrated

The Longest Day
I don’t think we’ll ever see another film with a cast of stars as big as this. It may not have Private Ryan’s realism, but overall a far more entertaining and involving film. The ariel tracking shot during the French assault is stunning.

Avatar
I tried to give it another chance but was bored shitless. Went back to it for the battle at the end, and that was pretty underwhelming as well. An abysmal film.
dandan
soldier girls - wipe that smile off your face...

'soldier girls' is an early nick broomfield documentary, which i remember watching half of when it was on tv, many moons ago. well, i remembered the guy biting the head of a chicken, but that was about it. the film basically follows a group of girls during their basic training, in the american army, about thirty years ago and, in particular, it focusses on a couple of them who are not really enjoying themselves and want out.

i suppose i could say the conclusion i drew from this documentary is this: if you are in the army, you are either stupid or an arsehole. maybe that is just the impression it gives. are the people who want out stupid? even if they claimed they were tricked into joining up by recruiters, they still joined up: surely, one can't be fooled that much. it's not like they were press ganged. are the people who give them no end of grief arseholes? well, on one hand, not wanting someone to kill themselves or endanger someone else, because they weren't paying attention or engaging in training is fair enough, but the delight that these officers take and their attempts to be inventive and funny, when they are dishing out awful hazings to want-away-recruits, makes them look like wankers.

i guess i have a very different idea of how one should attempt to inspire, motivate and engage with someone...

any how, this is an interesting watch; staff sergeant abing has some interesting / outlandish views, there's lots of talk of russians and communists (which now just seems hilarious) and there's also some very questionable lyrics in a couple of the drill chants, mainly about wanting to go to iran and kill and arabian (less hilarious)...

any how, a restrained, early broomfield doc and one where it would've been nice if they'd at least attempted to remaster the sound on the dvd. more interesting as a slice of life look at the views of the us army thirty years ago: i wonder how different it would be now...

good.
maian
Blue Valentine

Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams played a couple whose marriage is in its death throes. But, using a flashback structure, they are also playing a couple who have just started going out. Jumping between the two time periods, one in which they are flush with the excitement of new love and the other in which Williams is barely able to hide her deep ambivalence towards him, director Derek Cianfrance creates a poignant, deeply sad and moving film about a dying relationship.

That makes it all sound very serious and depressing, but there is a humour and lightness to the film that I wasn't expecting. In both time periods, or at least up until a point, Gosling is the living embodiment of charmisma and charm, and displays a goofy side that makes it easy to see why Williams fell for him in the first place, but which also shows why his lack of maturity as a husband and a father would drive her crazy. The scenes set in their past are full of light and passion - one scene in which Gosling accompanies Williams on the ukelele as she tap-dances, is an utter delight - and there are moments of tenderness even in the doldrums of their married life, such as a sweetly sad scene in which they dance to "their" song.

At the same time, the film is at times every bit as fraught and tense in places as it is light and funny in others. The much discussed scene in which the two try to have desultory, awkward and passionless sex in a tawdry motel - a scene which generated some controversy when it briefly landed the film with an NC-17 certificate in America (subsequently downgraded to an R) despite the scene being in no way graphic, just uncomfortable and sad - is pretty tough to watch, not because it is explicit or violent, but because it is painfully real and intimate. The film as a whole is very much like that scene. It aims to show the messy side of love and it succeeds, thanks to a strong script and two utterly captivating central performances.
logger
QUOTE (dandan @ Jan 11 2011, 03:11 PM) *
there's also some very questionable lyrics in a couple of the drill chants, mainly about wanting to go to iran and kill and arabian (less hilarious)...

That still goes on.
Sostie
F
OK little horror about a group of hoodies terrorising the occupants of a school at night. Wanted a bit more of conclusive ending.
Rua
QUOTE (maian @ Jan 9 2011, 11:58 PM) *
The Men Who Stare At Goats was pretty diverting but not much else. It's best in its first half when it seems committed solely to showing the absurdities of the experiments, but once it tries to turn it into a vaguely political comment on the use of torture and the madness of War it completely loses its funny, expecting us to care about characters that it has spent no time setting up as anything other then joke machines. A full embrace of absurdism or a greater commitment to making the characters feel like real people would have made it a much better film, but in the end it's half a good comedy, half an uninteresting drama.


Yes. I did several other things while watching it. It was a pleasant distraction in a tone I enjoy with some faces I like.
Ade
QUOTE (Sostie @ Jan 10 2011, 11:30 AM) *
Dinner For Schmucks
Despite owning it for years I have yet to see the French original so I can’t really compare. It’s OK. Few, if any laugh out loud moments despite a top comedy cast.

I've yet to see Dinner For Schmucks, but I lost all hope of it being much cop when the full trailer came out.

However, I can’t say enough about the original Le Dîner de Cons - It's one of my all time favourite comedies in any language, and I continue to watch it on a fairly regular basis. I say watch it as soon as you can, sir.
Julie
I saw Tron: Legacy last night. It was very pretty and the soundtrack alone was worth the price of admission.

Out of curiosity, though, is it wrong to fancy Jeff Bridges a tiny bit?
widowspider
QUOTE (Julie @ Jan 12 2011, 03:22 PM) *
I saw Tron: Legacy last night. It was very pretty and the soundtrack alone was worth the price of admission.

Out of curiosity, though, is it wrong to fancy Jeff Bridges a tiny bit?

Oh god no. He's definitely up there in the older-man hot crumpet category.
Zoe
127 Hours (2010)

Loved it.

Franco is amazing and utterly believable. The immediacy of some sections combined with the understandable flights of fancy make for a very compelling and entertaining mix. My heart was pounding through my chest at the end, as frustration and terror gave way to elation. I don't think a film has so successfully put me in the place of the protagonist since 'Punch Drunk Love'. You feel extreme empathy for a character who puts himself in an extraordinary situation that no one I know ever would, and the joy felt at his (admittedly grizzly) escape was palpable throughout the cinema. I would pay to hear his motivational speeches.

'That scene' is nowhere near as graphic as I was expecting, and like the hobbling in 'Misery' treads that careful line between appropriately horrifying and losing your audience entirely.

I hope James Franco has to present himself an Academy Award on Oscar night.

Probably my 2nd or 3rd favourite Danny Boyle film.
Zoe
Thinking about it this morning, I was particularly impressed with how they used flashbacks as a form of everyday time travel.

That's something very recognisable to everyone, or at least me. When his contact lenses are irritating him and he has a strong sense memory of putting them in. It's something I think we all do in situations like that (something terrible has happened and an action makes us strongly recall the last time we did the same thing before the catastrophic event). Repetition can be so dramatically changed by circumstance and yet in itself it makes travelling back in time feel almost possible.

You can use it to travel forward in time too. Washing my hair in the bath on a Thursday morning I might think, "the next time I do this it will be Friday night". Then when you recall thinking that on Friday, its as if no time has passed.

Anyway, I am rambling, but it's just one way in which the sections in which we're out of the canyon still feel like we're trapped with Aron. It's not back story, it's a form of temporal escape through imagination. We're still inside his head.

I thought it was really interesting.
dandan
i think it's josie long who makes a very similar hypothesis to you, in the stopping time episode of 'jon ronson on...'
Zoe
QUOTE (dandan @ Jan 13 2011, 11:50 AM) *
i think it's josie long who makes a very similar hypothesis to you, in the stopping time episode of 'jon ronson on...'


Ah yes! I remember hearing it at the time and thinking "I do that too!"

I'm not sure Jon was convinced!

I also think it's sort of covered in 'Time: A User's Guide' - but that book is mainly bollocks as I recall.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Zoe @ Jan 12 2011, 11:55 PM) *
I hope James Franco has to present himself an Academy Award on Oscar night.


I wondered about this. It might happen. Awesome.

I don't mind Franco one bit. He is more interesting than 99% of his peers (having fun with being famous even though pretentiously) and his short stories are actually really good. His portrayal of James Dean was immense too. I am now really looking forward to this film.

And it is never wrong to fancy Jeff Bridges. It's JEFF FUCKING BRIDGES.
maian
Watched on the plane:

Easy A

Olive (Emma Stone) is a girl at a high school in California who, in order to get out of going camping with her friend's hippy parents, says that she has a date. The next Monday, she inadvertently lies and says that she had sex with the imaginary guy, and some finds herself being labelled the school slut. Matters are complicated when a gay friend of hers asks her to say that they slept together so that people will think that he is straight and stop bullying him. This then spirals as other guys want her to do the same, and she loses control of the lie.

Much like its main character, it isn't quite as smart as it thinks it is. The connection to The Scarlet Letter is at first alluded to, then hammered home over and over and over and over, which was a bit irritating because it suggested that the film-makers didn't have enough faith in their own script to sell the idea without making constant reference to the source. Ditto its references to John Hughes films. There are some instances where wearing your influences on your sleeve, or like a great red A on your chest, gets annoying.

However, the script is pretty smart and witty, certainly better than a lot of other teen comedies, and the comparisons to Clueless are warranted. Emma Stone is great. She's really funny, quite sexy and handles the few emotional beats of the film very well, particularly one scene in which she is faced with a guy who thinks that she has been having sex in exchange for money, which is creepy and awkward in the best way. The supporting cast is very good. Even if her parents (Stanley Tucci and Patricia Clarkson) seem like Manic Pixie Dream Parents a lot of the time, they are very funny, as is Thomas Haden Church as Olive's favourite teacher.


The Expendables

Boring, boring, shit and boring.

My main problem with it is not just that it's bad, but that it doesn't have the courtesy to be badass. There's plenty of action movies that aren't especially good but, through their sheer ridiculousness, become hugely entertaining. Commando is one such film. The Running Man is another. In fact, a lot of Arnold Schwarzenegger's films are like that, and I did find myself wishing that the film had followed what his group of mercenaries were up to instead of Stallone's. Anyway, apart from the scene in which Terry Crews saves everyone by literally shooting a bunch of guys to pieces, then screaming "Remember this shit at Christmas!" there wasn't a single badass moment in a film filled with professional badasses.
Jimmay
QUOTE (maian @ Jan 13 2011, 01:18 PM) *
The Expendables

Boring, boring, shit and boring.

My main problem with it is not just that it's bad, but that it doesn't have the courtesy to be badass. There's plenty of action movies that aren't especially good but, through their sheer ridiculousness, become hugely entertaining. Commando is one such film. The Running Man is another. In fact, a lot of Arnold Schwarzenegger's films are like that, and I did find myself wishing that the film had followed what his group of mercenaries were up to instead of Stallone's. Anyway, apart from the scene in which Terry Crews saves everyone by literally shooting a bunch of guys to pieces, then screaming "Remember this shit at Christmas!" there wasn't a single badass moment in a film filled with professional badasses.


These were my sentiments entirely right down to that scene being the only real stand out moment. However, I did really like the firebombing of the pier as well. It wasn't shit enough to be good I felt. Hopefully they'll ramp it up for the sequel.
Sostie
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Jan 13 2011, 01:34 PM) *
Hopefully they'll ramp it up for the sequel.


Get rid of everyone except Stath, Willis, Dolph and Crewes. Better sequel sorted
maian
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Jan 13 2011, 01:34 PM) *
These were my sentiments entirely right down to that scene being the only real stand out moment. However, I did really like the firebombing of the pier as well. It wasn't shit enough to be good I felt. Hopefully they'll ramp it up for the sequel.


Actually, that bit was pretty cool as well. It almost made up for the scene directly beforehand where Stallone ran after the plane looking like a darts player chasing pie.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Sostie @ Jan 13 2011, 01:40 PM) *
Get rid of everyone except Stath, Willis,


Why not just have these 2 - in a buddy movie.

Hobbes
127 Hours is ossum, Zoe is right. I was surprised just how much I enjoyed it. A brilliant fillum.
maian
Country Strong

Gwyneth Paltrow is the country starlet who is planning a comeback after a tragic event sent her to rehab. Garrett Hedlund is the young singer-songwriter who befriends her and winds up on tour with her, alongside young ingenue Leighton Meester. Alcohol and heartbreak ensue.

I went with my mum to see this because no one else would and I expected to hate it, based on the vitriolic reviews, but I didn't think it was all that bad. Gwynnie does very well with a cliched and melodramatic role (you could probably just insert any other cast members' name and that sentence would hold true) and there is a certain charm to its hokey, rose-tinted vision of Nashville. It's obviously not as good as Nashville, Shut Up and Sing, Crazy Heart or Walk The Line, all of which it resembles in one sense or the other, but it's pretty harmless and really not deserving of the scorn that has been poured on it. Much like the songs, which veer towards the over-produced commercial country of Garth Brooks, it's very much the Shania Twain of country music films; it has very little connection to the reality of country music, but it's inoffensive and pleasant enough.

Rubbish title, though. Even in context.
Atara
QUOTE (Julie @ Jan 12 2011, 03:22 PM) *
I saw Tron: Legacy last night. It was very pretty and the soundtrack alone was worth the price of admission.

Out of curiosity, though, is it wrong to fancy Jeff Bridges a tiny bit?


No! It is maybe a bit wrong to fancy CGI young Jeff with it's freaky big mouth...but I do. I fancy all Jeff Bridges, it is a rule.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Atara @ Jan 13 2011, 09:45 PM) *
No! It is maybe a bit wrong to fancy CGI young Jeff with it's freaky big mouth...but I do.


If it's wrong - I like being wrong.


dandan
possession - there is nothing in common among women except menstruation...

mark (sam neill) returns to berlin, having finished a work assignment, only to find that his marriage to anna (isabelle adjani) is breaking down. anna has taken a lover and, although the mark is trying to salvage the relationship for the sake of their son, anna's behaviour is becoming increasingly erratic. when anna disappears, claiming that she's visiting a friend, mark discovers that she isn't, nor, as she subsequently claims, was she with her lover, heinrich (heinz bennent), who has been in touch with mark. where is anna going?

yowser...

'possession' is an allegorical tale of the breakdown of a marriage, based partly on director, andrzej zulawski's personal life, presented under the mask of a horror film. rich in the exploration of psychological torments, the film is manic and stylised: the performances are intense and unsettling, the music is restrained to the point of appearing absent, barring a couple of intrusions and the cinematography is quite amazing. shot almost entirely through wide-angle lenses, either utilising dolly tracks or hand-held camera work, there are very few occasions where the camera is not moving in to or around the characters. when this cinematography is of such a high standard, the performers are firing on all cylinders and zulawski has been so meticulous in his selection of colour schemes, locations and production design, the result is truly a joy to watch...

the result is, at times, like watching dance, where the choreographer has the ultimate luxury of deciding the exact angle from which their audience sees each movement of each performer. in perhaps what is the film's most infamous scene - in the subway - this choreographic direction is coupled with an incredible performance from adjani, producing something breath-taking.

any how, despite some flaws and a mildly spoilerific dvd cover / opening credits, 'possession' is a pretty fantastic viewing experience: it's the kind of film that you watch, then you watch the hour long documentary which accompanies it, then you watch it with the director's commentary, go to bed and then find yourself thinking about watching it again the next day.

great stuff.
dandan
le cercle rouge - and, despite appearances, i'm no professional...

corey (alain delon) leaves prison, the morning after a guard tells him about a possible job, which might see him back inside if it goes wrong. after settling some business in marseilles, he sets off on the road to paris. meanwhile vogel (gian maria volonte) is being escorted cross-country by mattei (andre bourvil), from whom he manages to escape and, in an attempt to slip through the police dragnet which forms swiftly, he climbs into the boot of a car at a roadside restaurant. it just so happens that the car belongs to corey and, when two such characters get together, it isn't long before they're planning a job. the job...

and so it begins... well, actually, that's probably the first thirty minutes of this underplayed, minimalistic heist movie. it's a slightly odd film, which just kinda flows along, it is smooth, relaxed and seems to glide through its two and a bit hours. delon is his blue eyed, handsome, cool self, whilst volonte is his only slightly more rugged foil. on the flipside, to these two swarthy, smouldering types, is bourvil's, almost clinically, uncool detective: who, seemingly being mocked by melville, wears a very similar long, beige overcoat, ala delon, but his, prim, buckled exterior just looks silly when compared with his adversary...

still, without being overblown or flashy, melville creates a glorious, engaging and tense affair. i suppose the epitome of melville's restraint is illustrated by the heist itself, which lasts almost thirty minutes and, dialogue free, is executed in almost total silence, yet draws the viewer in completely.

cracking stuff.
maian
True Grit (2010)

Pretty fantastic. It's interesting to see that The Coen Brothers have been able to make their most accessible film without necessarily compromising their particular style. It still looks as good as all their films do and it still bears the hallmarks of all their previous films - including off-kilter performances and witty, archaic dialogue (though in this instance almost all of it comes from Charles Portis' novel, but they have captured the tone perfectly) - yet at the same time they don't let their particular tics get in the way of the story. The end result is a fairly straightforward Western delivered in a very distinct way.

Jeff Bridges is great as Rooster Cogburn, really capturing the drunk, down and out charm of the character whilst also setting himself apart from John Wayne's portrayal. More important, though, is the performance of Hailee Steinfeld as Mattie Ross. It is her story, more than anyone else's - the grit of the title doesn't refer to Cogburn, after all - and she brings the right level of fiery Presbyterian self-righteousness and petulance to the character, making her into a force of nature in the form of a fourteen year old girl.

At times incredibly funny, at times incredibly exciting, at times incredibly sad and moving. In fact, it's pretty incredible throughout.
Julie
I'm so glad it's not just me.
maian
Black Swan

Crazy, audacious and brilliant. Two parts All About Eve, one part Suspiria, a soupcon of The Red Shoes and, in Natalie Portman's performance, a healthy dose of Antichrist. Aronofsky does a great job of capturing the grace and movement of the dancers as well as the physical demands that are placed upon them, both in the more low-key scenes of Nina preparing her shoes or injuring herself and in the almost Cronenbergian body horror that creeps into the film. The last half an hour, in particular, is nuts in that regard. Pretty stunning.
Zoe
SATC 2

Very much in the running for worst film I've ever seen (with 'Bridget Jones' Diary', 'The Hard Word' & 'Anger Management')

I actually once shouted "DIVORCE HER" at Chris Noth.

I would start listing the offensive/awful moments, but it would take too long. Suffice to say it is charmless, deluded and loathsome. It's a celebration of ostentatiousness, self-gratification, vanity, wealth and vacuity on a monumental scale. It is insulting to its audience, women, Islam, gay men, and dignity. There is nothing joyful about it, just scene after scene of embarrassment and/or degradation. Plus! They practically made Liza Minelli have a heart attack and RUINED the song 'Single Ladies'. If this is escapism, whose fantasy is this? Who dreams of being a selfish, jealous, insecure, old slapper with a motionless forehead, a complete lack of consideration or care for anyone else in the world, a drag queen's wardrobe, no sympathy or empathy, and an offensive amount of gaudy wealth? The final shot of a 54 year old Kim Catrall going at it on the bonnet of a car, as (I imagine 'they' meant it) an image of female empowerment, made me gag. Everyone involved should be utterly ashamed of themselves. It's things like this that make people hate us.

One final question... Didn't anyone notice the irony of a film spin-off of a hit TV show, being so anti-television that it practically ruined its central character's marriage?

The whole thing has to be a joke, right?
maian
I posited that it is, in fact, a work of Swiftian genius. Though, in actuality, it is just abominably shit.
logger
The Book of Eli

Watchable, mainly down to some superior acting and the thought that there was maybe a good story in there before Hollywood turned it into a comic book film, the action sequences are actually the most boring part of the film (well, maybe not the one with Michael Gambon and Frances de la Tour). In the end, it's enjoyable(ish) in a "nothing else on tv, just been playing Fallout" kind of way.
sweetbutinsane
QUOTE (maian @ Jan 16 2011, 02:30 AM) *
I posited that it is, in fact, a work of Swiftian genius. Though, in actuality, it is just abominably shit.


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