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Serafina_Pekkala
I wanted to see this but never got round to it. Rita, Sue and Bob Too is a fookin' classic but Andrea Dunbar's staggering life is tragic even to this day. Lorraine Dunbar killed her own baby son with her methadone.

Edited for spoils - R.
maian
Could you spoiler that last bit? That's actually a really big part of the film, and I didn't know about it and wouldn't want to ruin it for anyone else who has yet to see it.

The film is as much about Lorraine's life as it is Andrea's, and it does a really great job of showing how her childhood led to the tragedy in her later life, but by showing how her family and friends perceive her it avoids just saying that she was a victim of circumstances.

Serafina_Pekkala
If you insist but it was all over the papers so hardly a secret. I knew about it and I haven't seen the film.

The mods will have to do it - I can't edit.
maian
It probably doesn't matter all that much. It's just that I was unaware of it, so I didn't know how big of a story it was.

Anyway, I highly recommend The Arbor. No one should expect a terribly fun watch, mind.
maian
I watched Badlands for the first time in four or five years for an article I'm writing on it. I'd forgotten just how brilliant it is, and this time I was really struck by how much of it is concerned with the idea that Kit (Martin Sheen) is trying to craft his own legend by acting like a movie star, even as he is murdering people left and right.
Rebus
Burke and Hare

It was mostly fun nonsense, but not much more than that. The cameo spotting was a good laugh, but alas there seemed to be a lot of talent spread a little too thin. I don't know if murdering innocent people really lends itself to a comedy, especially not an Ealing one. There were too many typical gags for it to be a true black comedy, which in turn seemed to undermine the times it tried to be serious. I don't know, I guess the film just didn't really sit very comfortably with itself.

Isla Fisher's accent, and indeed overall performance, was great. Bill Bailey was, as ever, a joy to watch, and it was wonderful seeing Tom Curry get his beautiful teeth stuck into his role. Most of the accents were pretty spot on, but I have to say Andy's, Jessica's, and Simon's dreadful attempts were pretty distracting.

Seeing Michael Winner get chucked off a cliff was a particular highlight.
maian
Win Win

Paul Giamatti is a lawyer whose practice is going through a rough patch; he's so loathe to spend any of his dwindling funds that he refuses to pay for a new boiler to replace the increasingly noisy one in his basement and always unblocks the toilets rather than pay for a plumber. In a moment of desperation, he agrees to become the legal guardian of Leo, one of his clients, so that he can get the $1500 a month maintenance cheque. Things get complicated when Leo's grandson shows up, and Giamatti and his wife (Amy Ryan) take him in. When the kid displays some considerable skill at wrestling, he joins the high school team that Giamatti coaches and the two start to become friends.

Like his first two films, The Station Agent and The Visitor, Tom McCarthy's third is a quiet, unassuming film that hides considerably depth and emotion beneath its placid exterior. Through the sheer strength of the performances and writing, the characters emerge as complex, real people trying to do their best in a difficult situation, and McCarthy's refusal to play up the drama of the situation makes the story more affecting than it could be, especially considering how tried and tired the "kid teaches coach something about life and himself" trope is.

Funny, warm and deeply moving. In my Top 5 of the year so far.
Sostie
Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans
Not quite as mental as I hope/expected but still good stuff. Nic Cage has to be the most interesting/exciting/strange actors in Hollywood.
Serafina_Pekkala
Black Death

Strange little horror film set in medieval times from the director of Severance with a great deal of atmosphere and authenticity. Rather enjoyable if clearly done on a low budget. Young monk (with Cillian pout) is fed-up at a monastery and the surrounding titular plague death of Holy Grail proportions. Then Boromir turns up in his full Game of Thrones gear and says there is a village were nobody is effected by death. So they hunt it out and meet sexy lady from Black Book who lives with Lord Percy in a magic clean place. I thought they missed a trick with the twist assuming that they'd all be dead people but that didn't happen. Interesting locations and a great supporting cast make this better than it should be. Everyone is grubby and paranoid about God - which was the authentic part. The end was pretty interesting in that the main dude didn't turn out happy at all. Shades of The Name of the Rose, The Village and that film with Colin Firth and the pig (which I like). And a lot of Witchfinder General. Made me wish we made more films over here.

Quantum of Solace

Below-par Bond. No amount of lovely Olga Whats-her-face can make up for the fact the baddie is a French tosser in a floral shirt. Something about water tables and environment and Bolivia something. All I could think was the Joe Cornish song and 'how did that hotel get in the desert?'. Next ...
Sostie
Battle Los Angeles
As an alien invasion movie it's very cliched. As a "War" film, one of the most cliched I've ever seen. It's passable entertainment.
maian
The Big Sleep

Haven't seen it in a few years and it's still one of the greatest films ever made.
logger
QUOTE (maian @ May 17 2011, 03:11 PM) *
The Big Sleep

Haven't seen it in a few years and it's still one of the greatest films ever made.

That was the very first thing I watched when I gave up smoking, boy was that hard. Even the opening credits take the piss. They might as well have called it Lovely Fags.
maian
QUOTE (logger @ May 17 2011, 03:39 PM) *
That was the very first thing I watched when I gave up smoking, boy was that hard. Even the opening credits take the piss. They might as well have called it Lovely Fags.


If I'd seen it when I was younger it would have totally convinced me to take up smoking. And wearing a fedora. *sigh* What might have been...

Sugarland Express (1974)

Steven Spielberg's first theatrically released film (discounting Duel, which was shot for TV but got a theatrical release in Europe) in which Goldie Hawn (who I spent the whole film thinking "Didn't she used to look exactly like Anna Faris?" about) plays a mother who breaks her husband out of jail so that they can go and get their son from a foster home. Along the way, they inadvertently kidnap a police officer who they have to hold hostage to keep the hordes of police chasing them at bay.

Funny, fast and exciting. An overlooked gem. (Though, when you consider the films that Spielberg would go on to make, it's hardly surprising that it's been overlooked.)
Rebus
Source Code

Is it just me but is Geoffrey Wright the best hammer-upper in the world? It seems like it should be out of place and detract from everything he's in , but he's so bloody good at it that it works. I liked this, a little bit like if Hitchcock directed Groundhog Day written by Christopher Nolan. I loved the music especially, really added to the 'thriller' feel of it all, and had that kind of Pelham 123, French Connection feel to the score.

The ending almost undid all the good work that had gone before though, in my opinion. I just felt the way they wrapped it up was totally unnecessary and seemed a compromise to people who like happy-ever-after endings. But a solid flick nonetheless. Two for two for Duncan Jones, though I get the feeling Moon will always be his best work.
maian
QUOTE (Rebus @ May 17 2011, 09:35 PM) *
Source Code

The ending almost undid all the good work that had gone before though, in my opinion. I just felt the way they wrapped it up was totally unnecessary and seemed a compromise to people who like happy-ever-after endings. But a solid flick nonetheless. Two for two for Duncan Jones, though I get the feeling Moon will always be his best work.


I've grown to like the ending more over time since the idea that the Source Code can create alternate realities and that Wright's character doesn't actually understand what his invention does is an interesting concept. Maybe not the sort of concept that should be introduced five minutes before the film ends, but an interesting one all the same.
maian
Bridesmaids

Kristen Wiig co-writes and stars as Annie, whose best friend (Maya Rudolph) gets engaged and asks her to be her maid of honour. Unfortunately for Annie, Lillian's new rich friend Helen (Rose Byrne) seems intent on upstaging her at every opportunity, trying to push Lillian towards activities that Annie can't possibly afford.

There's a weird battle of wills at the heart of the film between a fairly nuanced examination of what happens when one half of a friendship realises that the other half is moving on and getting married when their life seems to have stalled, and a very broad gross-out comedy. Both halves of the film work, but they don't really sit that well with each other, which is a shame because apart from the tonal shifts Bridesmaids is a really terrific comedy. Wiig, Rudolph and Byrne are all good, with Wiig and Byrne being particularly great in the scenes in which they try to out-bitch each other. There are also some very nicely handled moments of comic escalation, such as an argument that Wiig has with a customer in the jewelry shop that she works at, or the beyond gaudy batchelorette shower, which no amount of description can really do justice to. There's also a sweetness to Annie and Lillian's friendship, and her burgeoning relationship with a cop (Chris O'Dowd, in fine shouty form) that nicely balances out the scene in which several cast members vomit on each other and shit themselves.

Like a lot of Apatow productions, it goes on about twenty minutes too long, though director Paul Feig (of Freaks and Geeks fame) does manage to keep things moving along and never lets it get too aimless. It runs out of steam the closer it gets to the wedding, but the natural charm of the cast just about carries it over the finish line.

Also, nice small roles for Jon Hamm as Annie's complete dick of a fuck-buddy, who gets to do non-chalant douchebaggering like only he can, and Matt Lucas as Wiig's roommate.
Sostie
Drive Angry
Milton (Nic Cage) escapes from Hell to avenge his daughter's murder and stop the sacrifice of his baby granddaughter at the hands of an evil cult leader. Meanwhile The Accountant (William Fichtner) is sent from Hell to to bring back Milton.
Cage, Fichtner, guns, tits and muscle cars = ridiculous, fun, hokum of the highest order.
Zoe
Archipelago (2010)

An extraordinary piece of film making, shot unlike anything I've ever seen before.

The camera is completely stationary for the majority of the film's scenes, creating an oddly voyeuristic quality. I felt like I was staring into a dolls house. The fact you don't get to see any of the actors faces in close-up until way into the film adds to the sense of peering into a private reality, a feeling only increased by the performances of the actors. They create humour, poignancy and awkwardness with light brush strokes, building in intensity.

It's the story of two adult children, taking a 'family holiday' to the Isles of Scilly, with their mother, a cook, and a painting instructor, before the son's imminent departure to Africa to teach sexual health.

It is both a comedy of manners and a completely unsensational depiction of a family in crisis.

Writer/Director Joanna Hogg is certainly one to watch.

The Back-up Plan (2010)

Not even plan B.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Zoe @ May 18 2011, 10:24 AM) *
Archipelago (2010)

I felt like I was staring into a dolls house.

Writer/Director Joanna Hogg is certainly one to watch.


A great description. I've seen it advertised and wanted to go but never go round to it. If it comes up again - I shall.

Hogg has great promise.
maian
QUOTE (Zoe @ May 18 2011, 09:24 AM) *
Archipelago (2010)

The camera is completely stationary for the majority of the film's scenes, creating an oddly voyeuristic quality. I felt like I was staring into a dolls house. The fact you don't get to see any of the actors faces in close-up until way into the film adds to the sense of peering into a private reality, a feeling only increased by the performances of the actors. They create humour, poignancy and awkwardness with light brush strokes, building in intensity.


Interesting. That description makes it sound like an Ozu film, and I really like his work. Must make the effort to check this out.
logger
Attack the Block

I had been put off by what I had seen in the trailers making it look unfunny and pandering. Even all the talk of films from the 80s had me wary that this would just be more masturbation from the grow the fuck up generation. But it has got great reviews so I decided to give it a go. Now we've discussed before on here how a trailer can make a film look bad. I wouldn't have watched Scott Pilgrim if it wasn't for Edgar Wright, the trailer for Four Lions put me off seeing that at the cinema. Those films were much better than the trailer made them out to be, in fact they were completely different films than the trailer made them out to be. Alas, that isn't the case here. The film could possibly be worse than the trailer made it out to be. It's not just that it's not funny, it's actively unfunny, sucking any joy out of the atmosphere, leaving the odd moment that could have worked floundering in disappointment. The one time I did laugh was at the end when the main woman is introduced as the woman who reported the mugging as the police are clearing up an alien invasion.

This awful, fall flat on its face, anti humour pretty much kills the film off. The gang of hoodies are obnoxious, this is kind of the point, but they don't have the charm or humour to carry it off and when their redemption comes they are still pretty obnoxious, charmless and unfunny. If it had been funny it might have been an alright film, not a good one but an alright film which would have been better than the shit one that it is. If it had been funny then maybe you could forgive the lack of excitement or thrills or suspense. They clearly had a low budget but things could still have been done so much better. Maybe if novice director Joe Cornish could have given the film any energy at all it could have worked.

Maybe I'm being too harsh as I'm clearly not the target audience, with this basically being Twilight for boys, but whilst Twilight gets ripped to shreds for being a little girls' film whilst critics are stumbling out of the Groucho club to heap praise on this as some kind of socially aware, sci fi, cult classic in the making rather than the dull, pandering, philosophically childish, little boys' film that it is. In fact, it reminded me of the British children's films that the BBC used to show in the afternoon in the 80s, only bloodier and cruder but just as amateurish. Then again, I'm not a middle class, middle aged, London, medianista so what would I know about how working class yoofs should be portrayed in films.

Possibly beats out Sucker Muncher as the worst film I've seen this year. If you've seen the trailer you've seen the best bits already so you don't need to bother.
maian
Cape Fear (1991)

Charming, erudite and well-read convict (Robert De Niro) gets out of prison and tries to start a new life for himself, yet the lawyer who defended him (Nick Nolte) just can't seem to leave him alone.

I enjoyed bits of Scorsese's remake of the 1962 classic, but overall I found it a little too much. Everything about it felt overcooked, from Nolte's "I AM SO FRUSTRATED!" acting to Scorsese's lurid direction, and whilst parts of it worked - the introduction of Max Cady, covered in tattoos, working out in prison, despite being so thoroughly and brilliant parodied on The Simpsons, is really impressive - over two hours it felt kind of oppressive. Even De Niro's performance, which starts out being really interesting and creepy, certainly once he starts trying to seduce Juliette Lewis, got very tiring by the end.

I got the feeling that the film would have worked better if it was closer to the more restrained original or if someone like Brian DePalma, who does overblown Hitchcock pastiches much better than Scorsese, had directed instead. You might even have got John Lithgow as Cady, which would have been fun.

Maybe it's just that I can't hear that Bernard Hermann theme without thinking of Sideshow Bob.

Anyway, this means that I've seen every feature film Scorsese's directed to date. Now, the documentaries.
logger
QUOTE (maian @ May 18 2011, 05:26 PM) *
You might even have got John Lithgow as Cady, which would have been fun.

I always thought they should have switched De Niro and Nolte's roles, although I'm not sure how convincing it would be to have Nolte seduce Juliette Lewis.
maian
QUOTE (logger @ May 18 2011, 05:51 PM) *
I always thought they should have switched De Niro and Nolte's roles, although I'm not sure how convincing it would be to have Nolte seduce Juliette Lewis.


De Niro can do buttoned-down more convincingly than Nolte, who always looks like a mountain man even when he's dressed like a lawyer. Admittedly, that does play into the idea of the family as fractured and dysfunctional nicely, and does make his shift to violence seem more natural. Then again, the great thing about the original was that the moment when quiet, gentle Gregory Peck punched seedy, violent Robert Mitchum was actually pretty shocking.
sweetbutinsane
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

Lots of swashbuckling. Very funny. No Will and Elizabeth (although no Pintel and Ragetti either). Yeah, I liked it a bit more than the last two.
Rebus
Welcome to Sarajevo (1997)

No set dressing required as it was shot amongst the rubble of the city still recovering from the bitter war that ended up taking the lives of about a quarter of a million innocent civilians. Starkly affecting, and brilliantly shot, making it difficult at times to decipher which was a scene being filmed by Winterbottom, and which was actual footage of some of the atrocities that went on. Needles to say, do not watch the movie if you can't handle real footage of the victims who were caught up in the fighting. All the performances were great, save perhaps for Marissa Tomei who detracted from the realism a little bit with a pretty Hollwood approach to her role.

The music was an especially brilliant touch, with scenes of absolute horror being juxtaposed with Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, and as a result really highlighting just how completely different and detached the West was during this time. Watching Bez jump around on Top of the Tops was about as far removed as you could get from the crisis in Sarajevo.

I guess it makes some kind of ironic sense that this film was largely ignored when it was first released, and got barely any release in theatres, just as the conflict itself was given the same treatment.
Hobbes
Attack the Block

Exactly the opposite of what logger said. Funny, kinetic, stylishly shot, well-written and uses its environment brilliantly. Perhaps skimps on the look of the monsters a bit (ie they're largely dark, ill-defined masses), but clearly due to budgetary things as oppose to intent.

Offers a look into adolescent life on the fringes in-between some excellent, and comedy set-piece filled, action scenes and funny dialogue between the leads, all of whom are entertaining and fit the look and sound of the flick to a tee. Cornish uses a few brilliant shots too, from the huge opening tracking shot down to Oval tube to the use of angled cameras to distort and mystify the block's hallways, making them seem far more alien than any spacecraft's interior.

The above spoiler is missing the point completely. The implication is that no-one outside the block knows what's happening because everyone stays as far from it as they can/ignores it, blaming all the disruption, noise and violence on the kids who have been (to an extent rightly) stereotyped as hoodies who just want to nick your watch and ride around on mini-scooters throwing bangers and fireworks. Hence she's "the woman who reported the mugging" because people don't know what's happening inside the confines of the estate.

See it, decide yourself. I liked it a lot. Excellent Buckles cameo as well.

ed: Comparing this to Twilight is preposterous. It's like saying beef and milk are the same thing just because they both come out of the same animal.
logger
QUOTE (Hobbes @ May 18 2011, 11:49 PM) *
ed: Comparing this to Twilight is preposterous. It's like saying beef and milk are the same thing just because they both come out of the same animal.

Twilight is a film for little girls to pretend to be mature. This is a film for little boys to pretend to be masculine.
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ May 18 2011, 05:26 PM) *
Cape Fear (1991)

Charming, erudite and well-read convict (Robert De Niro) gets out of prison and tries to start a new life for himself, yet the lawyer who defended him (Nick Nolte) just can't seem to leave him alone.

I enjoyed bits of Scorsese's remake of the 1962 classic, but overall I found it a little too much. Everything about it felt overcooked, from Nolte's "I AM SO FRUSTRATED!" acting to Scorsese's lurid direction, and whilst parts of it worked - the introduction of Max Cady, covered in tattoos, working out in prison, despite being so thoroughly and brilliant parodied on The Simpsons, is really impressive - over two hours it felt kind of oppressive. Even De Niro's performance, which starts out being really interesting and creepy, certainly once he starts trying to seduce Juliette Lewis, got very tiring by the end.

I got the feeling that the film would have worked better if it was closer to the more restrained original or if someone like Brian DePalma, who does overblown Hitchcock pastiches much better than Scorsese, had directed instead. You might even have got John Lithgow as Cady, which would have been fun.

Maybe it's just that I can't hear that Bernard Hermann theme without thinking of Sideshow Bob.

Anyway, this means that I've seen every feature film Scorsese's directed to date. Now, the documentaries.

I really enjoyed Scorcese's remake, although, having never seen the original didn't allow me the benchmark comparison. I would like to see the original at some point, certainly, and a rewatch of the 1991 version wouldn't go amiss either (about the only thing I can really remember of it now is my favourite line, delivered by cameo role Mitchum: "Well, pardon me all over the place.")
Sostie
Upside Down: The Creation Records Story
Feature length documentary about the rise of the greatest (British) record label ever. The level of hedonism going on in both the bands and the company itself, it's a wonder anything was ever released through the label. Lot's of great footage and great music, it's the type of "meat and potato" documentary that the BBC usually do so well.
I will probably spend the weekend uploading the Creation CDs I've not yet put on my iPod.

Do You Love Me Parts 8 & 9
Latest parts of the Nick Cave retrospective docs - covering Let Love In and Murder Ballads - featuring musicians, fans, friends etc. Everyone except Cave himself. The simple presentation - talking heads on a fixed camera, not cuts to any music or footage, no one asking questions - works well and is quite refreshing. If you worship at the Church Of Cave, well worth viewing.

Have parts 10 & 11 still to watch. I wonder if they'll have PJ Harvey on The Boatman's Call film. That could be veeery interesting
monkeyman
Tangled
Very enjoyable.
Hobbes
QUOTE (logger @ May 19 2011, 01:11 AM) *
Twilight is a film for little girls to pretend to be mature. This is a film for little boys to pretend to be masculine.


I'd contest that the former of these isn't wholly true, and that the latter is completely false.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (monkeyman @ May 19 2011, 10:18 AM) *
Tangled
Very enjoyable.


My wee niece loves this movie.

QUOTE
It's like saying beef and milk are the same thing just because they both come out of the same animal.


Fnar.
maian
QUOTE (Ade @ May 19 2011, 07:21 AM) *
I really enjoyed Scorcese's remake, although, having never seen the original didn't allow me the benchmark comparison. I would like to see the original at some point, certainly, and a rewatch of the 1991 version wouldn't go amiss either (about the only thing I can really remember of it now is my favourite line, delivered by cameo role Mitchum: "Well, pardon me all over the place.")


Mitchum and Peck are great in their cameos. I particularly liked the fact that they cast Peck as the exact opposite kind of lawyer that he played in the original.
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ May 19 2011, 01:40 PM) *
Mitchum and Peck are great in their cameos. I particularly liked the fact that they cast Peck as the exact opposite kind of lawyer that he played in the original.

I really do need to watch the original.


After many many months, I finally got around to seeing Bienvenue Chez Les Ch'Tis (Welcome To The Sticks) (or Welcome To The Shticks, to apply its more dialectically appropriate pronunciation).

French comedy fun starring Dany Boon (MicMacs), and Kad Merad as central protagonist Philippe Abrams. After fraudulently attempting to win a promtion to an office in the sought-after South, post office worker Philippe finds himself transferred instead to Bergues, an obscure rural town in the far North (notorious for its reputation as the worst location in all of France). Given the ultimatum by his superiors of either being fired, or accepting this most undesirable of transfers, Philippe opts for the latter, and leaving his wife and young son back home, sets off to commence his two year 'sentence'.

Upon his arrival, he finds communication with the locals something of a challenge, due to their bizarre Ch'ti (or Sh'ti) dialect. This lends itself to some wonderfully surreal exchanges of dialogue (the English subtitled translation of which, though not adhering to word-for-word accuracy, manages to convey the delightful confusion that ensues).

This wordplay and banter doesn't dominate proceedings however. As Philippe settles into his new job as Post Office manager and slowly overcomes the initial language barrier, he finds himself warming to the locals and his new co-workers. The story then switches focus to his unsuccessful attempt to convey to his wife that it's really not so bad in Bergues after all. His wife, assuming he's merely putting on a brave face to spare her worrying about him, decides to join him. Having been thrust into this situation because of his fraudulent attempt to better his career, Philippe finds himself resorting again to devious means in order to prevent his wife from discovering the truth (his reasons for which become clear soon enough, but it would spoil it to give away any further plot detail).

A sweet and affecting little comedy, with another affable turn from the ever-watchable Dany Boon. Well worth seeking out.
maian
That sounds delightful. I didn't care all that much for MicMacs but thought that Dany Boon was great and I really would like to see more of his work.

Thor

Watched it for a second time, this time with my Dad, and we both thoroughly enjoyed it. I wasn't as bowled over by it as I was the first time, but that may be more to do with the fact that I get a little bit uptight when I show someone a film I like and worry about whether or not they'll like it too.
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ May 20 2011, 03:25 AM) *
That sounds delightful. I didn't care all that much for MicMacs but thought that Dany Boon was great and I really would like to see more of his work.

It is a delight. Apparently the most successful film in French cinema history, according to sources. It is definitely a more conventional humour to that of MicMacs, and Dany Boon is very watchable. If you want to see some of his other work I would certainly recommend you also seek out The Valet (or Le Doublure, dir. Francis Veber), although Boon is in more of a supporting role, and indeed My Best Friend, where he shares more equal screen time with co-star, the excellent Daniel Auteuil (also in The Valet, as it happens).
maian
I do like Daniel Auteuil (mainly from his great performance in Girl On The Bridge) a great deal, even though it took me about six attempts to spell his name just then.

Oh, I didn't realise that My Best Friend was directed by Patrice Leconte. Another reason to check it out.
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ May 20 2011, 04:08 AM) *
I do like Daniel Auteuil (mainly from his great performance in Girl On The Bridge) a great deal, even though it took me about six attempts to spell his name just then.

Oh, I didn't realise that My Best Friend was directed by Patrice Leconte. Another reason to check it out.

I'm amazed I managed to spell it right first time out myself! More luck than judgement, but still.

I've been meaning to re-watch Girl On The Bridge again, as much for Auteuil's performance as the added frisson of La Paradis. And My Best Friend is jolly good fun too, well worth a looky.
Crutch
I caught the first half hour of Pulp Fiction on TV last night. I laughed my ass right off. Haven't seen it in maybe... five years or so. Way to long. It's such a brilliant concept to have freakishly dressed ex- or indie-stars sitting in ordinary places talking about funny shit.

Ultraviolet

Jovovich is hot.

The Hole

Didn't see it in about seven years or so. It aged really well. And it has one of the best gory shocks in my book. This image burned into my mind when I first saw it and it's still stuck there.
logger
The Host

I love The Host.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Ade @ May 20 2011, 03:21 AM) *
the ever-watchable Dany Boon.


he is great.
Ade
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ May 21 2011, 10:55 PM) *
he is great.

Oui, sh'est vrai, bien shur.

I meant to mention in my review that all the extras on the bonus DVD don't have English subtitles, which is a pity, as the array of extras themselves are pretty cool. The near-feature length 'Making Of' is pretty watchable though even without translation. If you understand a bit of French you can pick odds and sods up here and there, and the overall sense of fun that was had on set is fairly apparent.
sweetbutinsane
Moulin Rouge

I put it on just to check something but ended up watching the whole thing.
Shack
The Hurt Locker

Maverick bomb defuser bends the rules but gets results.

Disappointing, although Mr Renner was jolly good.
Rebus
Australia

I felt I had to get this out of the way, because I hate it when people say a film is utterly bollocks without having seen in and therefore can't pinpoint specifically why it is bollocks.

I can now do this, and specifically everything about this is terrible. It's a sad state of affairs when the best actor in it by a mile and half, is a twelve year old boy. I won't waste any more of your or my time talking about this dreadful film.
maian
The Company Men (2010)

Cinematic debut of John Wells, who as a producer was one of the driving forces behind ER and The West Wing (he took over as showrunner after Aaron Sorkin's acrimonious exit) amongst others, follows a year in the lives of a group of men who lose their jobs when the corporation they work for kicks off a round of corporate downsizing; family man Ben Affleck struggles to keep up the appearance of affluence as he struggles to find a new job; lifer Chris Cooper has to come to terms with a business world in which he is 30 years past being employable; and original staff member Tommy Lee Jones wonders about his own complicity in the destruction of so many jobs, including his own.

I don't mean for this to sound like an insult, but The Company Men is pretty much a textbook definition of an "average" film. As I say, I don't mean that as a negative; it's well-acted, nicely directed, it moves at a decent pace and it maintains a nice balance between being a character drama and a worthy issues movie, but there's not really anything hugely special about it. It's fine. It's a fine film.

What sets it apart is how well-meaning and big-hearted it is. It accepts the concerns and worries of all its characters as valid and doesn't really side with any of them, showing the good and bad side of every character with the possible exception of the CEO, who is presented as a greedy sonofabitch who refuses to sell the new corporate headquarters to improve the share prices when he could fire more people. It spends a lot of time setting up what a pompous, arrogant prick Ben Affleck's character is, taking him to a point where he has to be humbled and accept that he must change his life in order to adjust to his new situation. (He put me in mind of those over-privileged tabloid columnists who complain about how they have scrape through on only a grand a week.) It's a really obvious plot development, but it's one that feels earned and gives the final third of the film, in which he is reduced to helping his brother-in-law (Kevin Costner) on a building project feel like something a bit more than just an appeal to blue-collar values.

Not a bad film, not a great film, but a solid, well-made film.
maian
Hanna (2011)

Probably Joe Wright's best film to date. A compelling, beautifully shot thriller with a great central performance by Saoirse Ronan as a teenager trained to kill by her father (Eric Bana). It's propulsive, engaging, and manages to find time amongst the fights and chases for a story of a young girl trying to discover her place in a world which she is completely unprepared for.

Also; great Chemical Brothers score. It splits its time between being lilting, fairytale simplicity and the adrenaline-pumping aggression, which perfectly suits the film.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Rebus @ May 22 2011, 08:54 PM) *
Australia

I felt I had to get this out of the way, because I hate it when people say a film is utterly bollocks without having seen in and therefore can't pinpoint specifically why it is bollocks.

I can now do this, and specifically everything about this is terrible. It's a sad state of affairs when the best actor in it by a mile and half, is a twelve year old boy. I won't waste any more of your or my time talking about this dreadful film.


The magical Aboriginal gurly-boy? Worth reposting then.

Nicole is so awful. She is getting less good with age. It should be the other way round.
Sostie
Limitless
Pretty entertaining

Iron Man II
Enjoyed it a little more second time round. The Iron Man/War Machine shoot-out with the drones is good, as is Black Widow's little scuffle. Best of all is Gwyneth Paltrow. Oh, and the AC/DC tracks.

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