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Zoe
Did I mention I got the tickets free?
maian
It's upgraded from ''quiet'' hatred to ''incoherent, angry babbling''.
Ade
I really much check out Once.



Over the past couple of days I have been mostly watchin' The Bank Job, Thank You For Smoking and Boogie Nights, all of them excellent. Watching the latter last night for the first time in years, coupled with recent talk about Punch Drunk Love on this thread has prompted PDL off the shelf for a Paul Thomas Anderson double-bill with Magolia later today. Marvellous.
mcraigclark
Maybe I should give Once another shot. I was bored out of my mind by it.
logger
Mission Impossible 3

Perfect for a miserable Sunday afternoon.
maian
Interiors (1978)

First off, the case for the DVD was awful; they got two of the characters mixed up, misspelled the name of one of the main actresses and had a skyline shot of New York on the back even though it's probably the Woody Allen New York film that feels least like a film set in New York.

Aside from that, I thought it was a really solid piece of work from Allen. A dark drama that examines the fractures in the life of an affluent, talented family after the parents separate. The film takes place almost entirely in small rooms with just actors talking and I was really attracted to the starkness and intimacy of it. Everyone involved acquits themselves well and even if it feels a bit too much like a film that Allen made primarily to flex his dramatic muscles it still stands up on its own.
logger
There Will Be Blood

Would it be better if Eli Sunday was a stronger man and not just a whelp?
maian
QUOTE (logger @ Nov 23 2008, 10:44 PM) *
There Will Be Blood

Would it be better if Eli Sunday was a stronger man and not just a whelp?


I wouldn't say so. His weakness when confronted by Plainview makes his moment of revenge much more vicious, I feel.


WALL-E

On DVD this time and I'd just like to urge anyone who is a fan of the film or who has yet to see it to check it out on DVD. The main draw is the film itself, which is still fantastic, a strong contender for my favourite film of the year, and it loses none of its charm and wonder on the small screen.

The second reason is the extras, which are as good as you would expect from a Pixar DVD. My favourites so far have been a short film named BURN-E, which is a really funny, clever film about a minor character in the film that acts as an animated Rosencrantz and Guildernstern Are Dead, and the deleted scenes, one of which is a drastically altered version of a scene that made it into the final film which I feel is much weaker than what they went with but is still interesting since it provides an insight into how different the last act of the film could have been.
Ade
QUOTE (maian @ Nov 23 2008, 11:16 PM) *
WALL-E

Isn't the Presto short included on the disc? That was hilarious.
maian
QUOTE (Ade @ Nov 23 2008, 11:31 PM) *
Isn't the Presto short included on the disc? That was hilarious.


That is as well. Forgot about it briefly but it is on the disc and it is still hilarious.
Ade
Magiiiiic!

Cheers, Ed. Not that I wasn't going to be purchasing WALL*E on DVD at some point anyway, but that just sweetens the deal.
NiteFall
I may make it my first blu-ray purchase actually.
thirtyhelens
Frost/Nixon

Absolfuckin'lutely phenomenal. By far the best film Ron Howard's ever made; and I'm a big fan of Apollo 13, but it isn't even in the ballpark. Superbly realized from beginning to end, though I didn't get to see the stage version (and I'm kind of annoyed I didn't now, would have loved to see it on Broadway), I still get the feeling like it's a textbook example of how to open a play up for the screen. Terrific cast - Sheen is a marvel as always, the supporting crew (MacFadyen! Rockwell! Platt! Bacon!) all top notch, but man oh man... Langella is one for the ages. Despite all the flack that Stone's Nixon got and despite not really looking or sounding like him, I still thought Anthony Hopkins gave it a hell of a run... but Langella is Tricky Dick incarnate. If it weren't for the fact that everyone's talking up Mickey Rourke so strongly, I'd say he'd take the Oscar in a walk. I guess we'll see. Still, unmissable.

Extra bonus: saw it Friday night at a Paley Center event at the Arclight, so we had a lengthy Q&A afterward with Opie himself (who is pretty much exactly as he seems he'd be... affable as anything, although maybe a bit shorter.) and the excellent Peter Morgan, who was erudite and hilarious and pretty much charmed the pants off the entire room. Great night.
Sostie
How To Lose Friends And Alienate People
Whilst managing to have only a few laugh out loud moments I still thoroughly enjoyed it.
maian
[Safe] (1995)

Julianne Moore stars as a San Fernando homemaker who finds herself becoming allergic to, well, everything. A condition known as ''20th Century Disease'', she becomes convinced that the only solution offered to her lies with New Age treatments at a ranch where councilors more closely resemble preachers than doctors.

I really like Todd Haynes as a director and this continued my love affair with his work. It's a film that appears quite conventional but is actually one of his odder films. It's all about establishing Moore's character in her own environment and presenting it as an incredibly clinical one lacking in personality of affection. The main thrust of the film's subtext is an attack on New Age treatments, specifically regarding the idea that serious illnesses can be treated by having people believe that they themselves are the cause of their own ailments, and it does it by dissecting the hypocrisy and inherent foolishness of such actions.

Julianne Moore is as brilliant as she ever is and delivers a subtle performance that conveys her worsening mental state as she becomes frustrated by her condition as well as the ease with which she surrenders herself to the empty promises of charlatans.


Mary Poppins (1964)

You could say it was dociousaliexpiisticfagilcalirupes, but that;s going a bit too far, don't you think?

I didn't realise that Dick Van Dyke played the Elder Mr Dawes. Not only did I not realise this whilst watching it, but I'm quite surprised that I have never known this, considering how many times I've seen this film.


Waltz With Bashir (2008)

Simply stunning. Exceeded my expectations by quite some margin. It's a stylish, often brutal look at what war is like for those on the ground and the effects it has on them in the long run. It deals with subjects like dreams, memories and collective amnesia in a way which just couldn't be done as effectively in live action.

Also, given the fact that its an Israeli film, I was surprised by how pro-Palestinian, or at least not anti-Palestinian, the film is. It portrays the Lebanese as an enemy, given that it tells the stories of men in the Israeli Army, but also shows them to be victims of Israeli aggression and absolutely condemns the massacre that lies at the heart of the film and Ari Folman's dreams.

The soundtrack is also really fantastic, not merely in the way in uses songs by PiL and OMD but also the original pieces of music by Max Richter, much of which is very electronica-influenced and adds a real sense of immediacy to proceedings, particularly during the opening sequence.

An hallucinatory experience that is truly awe-inspiring. Though the live action footage at the end is a bit much.
PrincessKate
Burn After Reading

I missed the first few minutes but apparently it still wouldn't have made much more sense - good performances all round and a nice quirky comedy.
melzilla
Quarantine.

Having already seen Rec. this did just feel like a cheap Hollywood imitation with slightly more annoying characters and even more terrible camerawork which had given me a headache by the end of the film.
maian
Hunger (2008)

Tough, exciting film about the last weeks in the life of Bobby Sands (Michael Fassbender), the IRA prisoner who went on a hunger strike in 1981 in protest at the British government's treatment of prisoners and subsequently died as a result of his actions.

Director Steve McQueen brings a real visual flair to the whole thing that makes the most mundane actions seem hypnotic and exciting. The film practically relishes mundanity, in fact, since it spends such a lot of time establishing the way in which the prison it is set in works, as if luring the audience into a false sense of security before smashing them over the head with the humiliation, degradation and violence that happens in a seemingly boring place. It works wonders and I was gripped throughout.

It's an oddly contradictory film in many ways. It's odd and unique yet relies on repetition of mundane acts. It's a film which features almost no dialogue, yet its most celebrated scene is the one which is nothing but. Incidentally, that single shot scene between Bobby Sands and the priest is really captivating, moving from funny to deadly serious at the drop of a hat and refusing to side with either participant.

I'm not really sure how I feel about the film intellectually or morally, but my gut reaction tells me that it was brilliant. I left the cinema feeling stunned in a way that rarely happens.


I also caught the end of the Disney version of Robin Hood because my housemates were watching it and I needed something to cheer me up.
dolfyn
I had me a Charlton Heston DVD double feature last weekend with Ben-Hur & The Greatest Show On Earth. Both films are still enjoyable after all these years. cool.gif I couldn't help but admire Heston's performances, despite my opinion of the man himself diminishing in recent years with all that NRA rubbish. rolleyes.gif

I also watched The Silence Of The Lambs last night for the first time in ages, with my (almost 14 year old) niece. It was her first time seeing it, & she was grabbing onto my arm on several occasions. happy.gif But I had to laugh at her comment about the ending; "So she (Starling) doesn't catch him (Lector)? That's gay!" laugh.gif
It still stands up as a chilling, sometimes gross, & rather gripping movie. unsure.gif

Feel the love (that's bigger than.... well, you know).
dolfyn.
wink.gif
shaka37
I just saw "Twilight" and it was awful. It's 90 minutes I am never getting back. People (myself included) were laughing out loud. The dialog was about as bad as Padme and Anakin in "Attack of the Clones." My friend and I almost walked out.
Atara
QUOTE (thirtyhelens @ Nov 24 2008, 06:17 AM) *
Frost/Nixon

Absolfuckin'lutely phenomenal. By far the best film Ron Howard's ever made; and I'm a big fan of Apollo 13, but it isn't even in the ballpark. Superbly realized from beginning to end, though I didn't get to see the stage version (and I'm kind of annoyed I didn't now, would have loved to see it on Broadway), I still get the feeling like it's a textbook example of how to open a play up for the screen.


I am glad it has translated well. I won't be seeing this at the cinema, as Chris is not interested but I did see it on stage on London three times so by what you have said I can be happy in the knowledge that the film is just as great. I look forward to the DVD release.
shaka37
QUOTE (thirtyhelens @ Nov 23 2008, 11:17 PM) *
Frost/Nixon

Absolfuckin'lutely phenomenal. By far the best film Ron Howard's ever made; and I'm a big fan of Apollo 13, but it isn't even in the ballpark.


I can't wait to see this. This whole cast is amazing. Actually, "Apollo 13" is in my Top 10. And I loved "The Paper." Ron Howard does very nice movies. ;-)
maian
The Fog of War: 11 Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara (2003)

Oscar-winning documentary from Errol Morris in which former U.S. Secretary of Defense, Robert S. McNamara is interviewed about his life and career, during which time he was President of Ford, served under Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson and, in the process, helped negotiate the Cuban Missile Crisis and to escalate the Vietnam War.

A hugely controversial figure, McNamara is a compelling interview subject, offering fascinating insights into some of the major events of The Cold War from an insider's perspective with wit, warmth and a constant emphasis on what could be learned from the conflicts he fought. This doesn't seem preachy, though, since he doesn't stress possible connections or correlations between Vietnam and modern U.S. foreign policy, in fact, in one of the deleted scenes on the DVD he flat out denies that he thinks that there is any direct correlation between the two, instead saying that the 'lessons' of the title could apply to any war.

An informative and entertaining documentary about an important figure. Worth checking out, particularly on DVD since there's an extra 30 minutes of scenes, some of which delve deeper into the McNamara's personal life, giving a richer portrait of the man.


Taxi To The Dark Side (2007)

Documentary about U.S. policy concerning torture. It starts off with a narrow focus on the case of an Afghan taxi driver who died as a result of being tortured by American troops before examining the wider use of such techniques, how the Bush administration has fogged up the definition of torture in order to use techniques that would otherwise be considered highly suspect and illegal.

Intelligent, incendiary cinema that will make any right thinking person's blood boil.
PrincessKate
Zack & Miri Make a Porno
Sod the mixed reviews, I mainly loved it. although I can see what they mean about the love story being a little clunky, Z&M's sex scene was so sweet, absolutely beautiful.. Justin Long as Brandon was brilliant, some kind of twisted rebellion against a decade of playing gawky teenagers? I heart Brandon St Randy.
Its a great film, and even if you don't enjoy it at the cinema, stay til the very ass end of the credits sequence.
logger
Speed Racer

One of the best and also worst films of the year. Definitely my guilty pleasure of the year.
sleeping_pirate
Dracula (1931)
maian
Aladdin (1992)

Good songs, good story, good fun. However, I couldn't help but find Genie unbelievably annoying now. Robin Williams really is just shit. I always preferred Dan Castellanata's version of the character.
Jimmay
Brazil

What? I can't help but feel I'm just missing the point of a lot of Gilliams movies. I didn't dislike this film but like Time Bandits it has dated quite badly. Still, there were some really interesting ideas throughout and like all of his films it left me confused but thoughtful at the end. Glad I saw it but I'd probably not watch it again.
Ade
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Dec 1 2008, 10:50 AM) *
Brazil

What? I can't help but feel I'm just missing the point of a lot of Gilliams movies. I didn't dislike this film but like Time Bandits it has dated quite badly. Still, there were some really interesting ideas throughout and like all of his films it left me confused but thoughtful at the end. Glad I saw it but I'd probably not watch it again.

Spooky. I very nearly watched that at the weekend, having was only just had a conversation about it at the pub a couple of nights previous. My friend highly recommended it, although I really can't say I've ever been especially motivated to watch it.
Sostie
QUANTUM OF SOLACE
I loved it. I like the new blunt instrument/Bourne approcah to the series. I don't miss the gadgets/quips one bit.

ENEMY OF THE STATE
Tony Scott flashy fun. Entertaining

ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 (remake)
On first viewing it was better than I could have ever anticipated. On second viewing it is still a rather impressive remake.
Jimmay
QUOTE (Ade @ Dec 1 2008, 10:57 AM) *
Spooky. I very nearly watched that at the weekend, having was only just had a conversation about it at the pub a couple of nights previous. My friend highly recommended it, although I really can't say I've ever been especially motivated to watch it.


If you'll like Gilliam then you'll probably like this. I find his films impressive but not particularly entertaining (excluding 12 Monkeys) and this one was no exception. So many times both Sarah and I groaned in confusion.
Jessopjessopjessop
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Dec 1 2008, 10:50 AM) *
Brazil

What? I can't help but feel I'm just missing the point of a lot of Gilliams movies. I didn't dislike this film but like Time Bandits it has dated quite badly. Still, there were some really interesting ideas throughout and like all of his films it left me confused but thoughtful at the end. Glad I saw it but I'd probably not watch it again.


You're not alone Jimmy. Twelve Monkeys is about the only Gilliam I could say was a 'good' film. His films have this terrible sound-stage atmosphere, he is not a particularly good action director, and the stories often feel like a teenager's scribblings. I think he gets by on whimsy and his stubborn pursuit of fantasy alone.
maian
Needless to say I disagree with Jimmay and Jessop, both about Brazil and Gilliam in general. I think he's a wonderfully inventive mind and even when his films don't work, and there's a fair few of them that don't, they're still unique visions that make me glad that he is still allowed to make films after all the problems he's had trying to get them made.

I'm quite partial to Brazil, myself. I think it's a really well constructed examination of dystopian archetypes which also serves as a subversion of action movie cliches and general attack on bureaucracy. It's by no means a perfect film or my favourite Gilliam film (which would be Twelve Monkeys) but I still think it is really terrific.

I'm also not sure about the 'dated' criticism. As far as I'm concerned, a film is still great no matter how old it is, unless it features attitudes that are no longer palatable. Then again, even something like Birth of A Nation (glorification of the KKK) and Triumph of the Will (glorification of Hitler) are still worthwhile in terms of technique and influence.
Zoe
I was pretty bored and baffled (word of the day) by Brazil, apart from Bobby of course.
Jimmay
QUOTE (maian @ Dec 1 2008, 01:50 PM) *
Needless to say I disagree with Jimmay and Jessop, both about Brazil and Gilliam in general. I think he's a wonderfully inventive mind and even when his films don't work, and there's a fair few of them that don't, they're still unique visions that make me glad that he is still allowed to make films after all the problems he's had trying to get them made.

I'm quite partial to Brazil, myself. I think it's a really well constructed examination of dystopian archetypes which also serves as a subversion of action movie cliches and general attack on bureaucracy. It's by no means a perfect film or my favourite Gilliam film (which would be Twelve Monkeys) but I still think it is really terrific.

I'm also not sure about the 'dated' criticism. As far as I'm concerned, a film is still great no matter how old it is, unless it features attitudes that are no longer palatable. Then again, even something like Birth of A Nation (glorification of the KKK) and Triumph of the Will (glorification of Hitler) are still worthwhile in terms of technique and influence.


I think it was the quite obvious uses of amstrad's and Sinclair C5's which made me chuckle and dated the film. These glimpses of the future that they put in the film which have either been massively surpassed or fallen on their faces as a ridiculous concept.

I think my problem with Gilliam are the things you've listed. He seems to spend so much time perfecting his vision and the overall feel of the film with spectacular and unusual set pieces and designs which leave the story as an afterthought. So many unusual things which happen feel like ideas that came into his head which he HAD to put in regardless of whether the flow of the film was affected or not.

In this way they just come across as shoe-horned in and leave the audience (well me and Zoe at least it seems) baffled. In fact baffling (which now doesn't seem like a real word) is probably the best word to sum up the whole film. Thanks Zoe.
logger
Part of the reason Brazil's vision of the future seems dated is because it was harking back to the past and presenting a fifties idea of what the future would be like.
Chapman Baxter
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Dec 1 2008, 02:05 PM) *
I think it was the quite obvious uses of amstrad's and Sinclair C5's which made me chuckle and dated the film. These glimpses of the future that they put in the film which have either been massively surpassed or fallen on their faces as a ridiculous concept.


Brazil had communication by pneumatic tube, tank-tops are fashionable day-wear and most of its broadcasts are in black-and-white. The design is meant to look dated and drab, not give glimpses of the future.

QUOTE (Jessopjessopjessop @ Dec 1 2008, 12:08 PM) *
You're not alone Jimmy. Twelve Monkeys is about the only Gilliam I could say was a 'good' film. His films have this terrible sound-stage atmosphere, he is not a particularly good action director, and the stories often feel like a teenager's scribblings. I think he gets by on whimsy and his stubborn pursuit of fantasy alone.


That's an interesting criticism, since one of the themes of Brazil is that Sam Lowry's stubborn pursuit of fantasy finally condemns him to torture and insanity. Brazil is certainly staged, artificial and over the top, but for me that emphasises the nightmarish quality of the film.
dandan
i like 'brazil'...
Jimmay
QUOTE (Chapman Baxter @ Dec 1 2008, 02:40 PM) *
Brazil had communication by pneumatic tube, tank-tops are fashionable day-wear and most of its broadcasts are in black-and-white. The design is meant to look dated and drab, not give glimpses of the future.


I suppose that is highlighted by the opening "Somewhere in the 20th century" caption which alludes to the fact that it is some sort of alternate time. I found the film fascinating as I do with most of Gilliams films but that was about it for me and it made me loathe the 2 hours 20 minutes running time.
dandan
QUOTE (Chapman Baxter @ Dec 1 2008, 02:40 PM) *
tank-tops are fashionable day-wear


hey! i'm wearing a tank-top...
Sostie
I love Brazil, and anyone who thinks otherwise has a different opinion to mine.
dandan
yes, but where do you stand in the great tank-top debate?
Jimmay
QUOTE (dandan @ Dec 1 2008, 03:55 PM) *
yes, but where do you stand in the great tank-top debate?


I personally stand just behind and to the left of Shack rubbing his manly, tank-top clad shoulders.
sleeping_pirate
30 Days Of Night
maian
12:08: East of Bucharest (2006)

Romanian drama that, wait, you've already stopped reading, haven't you?

Anyway, it's right good. An interesting film that utilises black comedy and farce to nice effect to tell a story about a journalist who sets out to make a TV special asking the question of whether or not his town actually took part in the Revolution of 1989 if people only took to the streets after Nicolae Ceauşescu fled, effectively ending communism in the country.

The first half an hour introduces the characters to us, during which time director Corneliu Porumboiu uses an objective, distant style of shooting that allows us to observe the characters without really knowing them. The camera stays in one place and each scene is conducted in single takes, continuing even when characters are no longer on screen. It's very minimalist and disorientating since it mixes modern sensibilities with an incredibly old, traditional methodology, but once you get your head around it there is something quite entrancing about it, even if you never feel like anything other than an observer. This is all intentional, though, since it sets things up for the final hour, when the style changes drastically to a more personal, subjective one as we 'watch' the television special being filmed and are put in the thick of it with the characters as they argue about the revolution and whether one of them is lying about his involvement in it. The camera moves, the explanation being that the young cameraman in the studio is experimenting with a handheld style, and this gives an sense of energy and confusion to the filming as it reflects the efforts of the journalist to try and get to the truth.

The whole idea of how history and truth can perhaps never be reconciled was something I found particularly interesting and I felt that the film really had a handle on how people can rewrite the past based on future events or their opinion of someone after the fact and the film follows through with this idea right to the end.

Interesting and entertaining, the first half an hour is a bit difficult to get through but that's intentional since the camera maintains such a distance. Once the television special starts filming, it really picks up and winds up being compelling and fascinating, though I imagine a lot of people won't care for the ending.
NiteFall
I've never seen Brazil. Should I?
sweetbutinsane
Apollo 13

Pretty good.
widowspider
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Dec 1 2008, 07:05 PM) *
I've never seen Brazil. Should I?

Yes.
NiteFall
I trust you Rachel, so I shall. I'm just not sure when.
Shack
Lucas

Insect obsessed boy falls in love with slightly older girl who in turn falls in love with "Cappy" (not a trampy seadog character but Charlie Sheen).

A couple of things about this:

1. Lucas - mostly annoying.

2. The initial girlfriend "Cappy" had seemed perfectly nice and didn't do anything too wrong to deserve being dumped for the new girl on the block.

3. I'm not sure Lucas dropping the ball and getting knocked unconscious because he#d taken his own American football helmet off deserved such adoration. I think this mainly is because I found him quite annoying.
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