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Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 15 2011, 03:30 AM) *
Amazing.


My new favourite thing. I will see this film on Sunday.
Atara
As will I.
Serafina_Pekkala
New avy in honour too!
Sostie
QUOTE (NiteFall @ Sep 14 2011, 10:00 PM) *
Top Secret!

Probably still Val Kilmer's best film.


Probably ZAZ's best film.
NiteFall
I still prefer Airplane!
Jimmay
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 15 2011, 12:23 PM) *
Probably ZAZ's best film.


I agree. It was always a favourite "recorded off the telly vhs", even before I understood half of the jokes in it. Re-watching it recently I was amazed at how much I remembered and how much of it had permeated into things I say both outloud and in my head in day to day life.
maian
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 15 2011, 11:55 AM) *
My new favourite thing. I will see this film on Sunday.


I was invited to cover the premiere but it coincided with my parents' wedding anniversary. If I didn't love my family so much I would hate them.
Sostie
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Sep 15 2011, 02:01 PM) *
I agree. It was always a favourite "recorded off the telly vhs", even before I understood half of the jokes in it. Re-watching it recently I was amazed at how much I remembered and how much of it had permeated into things I say both outloud and in my head in day to day life.



Only yesterday, at work, I came out with a "Souvenieeeeeers...nooo-velties....party tricks"
Jimmay
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 15 2011, 01:20 PM) *
Only yesterday, at work, I came out with a "Souvenieeeeeers...nooo-velties....party tricks"


Chocolate Mousse and Gasoline are always said like the man himself. And occassionally if I do a particularly hearty sneeze, (in my mind at least) I run screaming out of the nearest window.
Sostie
QUOTE (Jimmay @ Sep 15 2011, 02:36 PM) *
Chocolate Mousse and Gasoline are always said like the man himself. And occassionally if I do a particularly hearty sneeze, (in my mind at least) I run screaming out of the nearest window.



"Le moooooooooo!"
logger
I (internally) shout Latrene and sacre bleu a lot. I thought it was just me.
maian
Contagion (2011)

Good, but very cold and pretty grim throughout. Soderbergh saps all humanity from a potentially sensationalised story of a deadly pandemic, trying to depict its impact at a number of different levels. The end result is interesting but hard to genuinely enjoy. In trying to depict the breakdown of society in as stark and realistic fashion possible, the film removes most of the aspects of the film that could have made it entertaining - it doesn't help that the most sympathetic and relatable character dies in the first half an hour. At the same time, that starkness, that coldness and that bleakness is what makes it an interesting film. You couldn't inject more human interest or emotion into it without destroying what the film is trying to be in the first place; a sombre and un-sensational treatment of a subject that is so often used for cheap thrills.

I appreciated what it was trying to do, but didn't enjoy what it was.
maian
The Lion King in 3D

One of the greatest films ever made gains nothing from being converted into 3D, but gains everything from being projected on the big screen again. The highlight was hearing my (22-year old) sister singing along to all the songs like a happy little loon.
GundamGuy_UK
Did it have that awful Morning Report song in it, from the DVD version?
maian
No! They took it out. Though there was an awful moment when I thought they had left it in, but it just went straight to the pouncing lesson, AS WAS INTENDED!
GundamGuy_UK
Honestly, that alone has tipped the scales firmly into "must see". I fucking despise that song.
logger
The Deer Hunter

A lot better than I remembered it. Also a lot longer, or maybe that was the 45 minutes of adverts.
maian
Drive (2011)

Like the best film Michael Mann never made. Sparse, cool action film in which Ryan Gosling plays a stunt driver who works as a getaway driver on the side, under the watchful gaze of mentor Bryan Cranston. When the husband of the woman he has feelings for (lovely lovely Carey Mulligan) reveals that he is in debt to some very bad people, Gosling offers to help him out. It goes as well as could be expected, and he has to deal with the fall out.

The tone of the film is meditative, with the first half consisting largely of Gosling and Mulligan staring at each other to a beautifully realised faux-80s electro-pop soundtrack, but that just heights the impact (and I do mean impact) of the action when it occurs. There's not a wasted shot or second in Nicholas Winding Refn's film; every moment is perfectly calibrated to move the plot or mood of the film forward, with each of the action sequences in the film being almost balletic in their choreography. (Not to mention horrifically violent. You can tell Refn asked Gaspar Noe for pointers on how to film brutal head trauma.) At the heart of the film is a cool, mesmerising performance from Gosling, who makes a strong case for him being the new Paul Newman. It helps that he has Ron Perlman and Albert Brooks (in a rare and terrifying serious turn) to play off of.

It's just a fantastic film. Really, really great.
Rebus
Along with Tinker, Tailor..., Drive is my most anticipated movie of the year. Both Pusher and Bronson were fantastic, but Winding Refn's writing can on occasion suffer just a little anticlimacticism, so to see him direct another's screenplay is very promising. I don't think I've seen Ryan Gosling in a thing, but he looks great in the trailer. Can't wait, though of course will have to until November. Grumble.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Rebus @ Sep 18 2011, 05:54 AM) *
Along with Tinker, Tailor..., Drive is my most anticipated movie of the year. Both Pusher and Bronson were fantastic, but Winding Refn's writing can on occasion suffer just a little anticlimacticism, so to see him direct another's screenplay is very promising.


This.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

I really enjoyed it - a great intelligent movie and lots of amazing period detail. The director, Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) does an immense job of capturing the essence of the period - if completely omitting the upper-crust Old Boy Network nature of the secret service. The TV series does this a lot better IMO and is more authentic to the reality. I doubt there were many Scousers in the service, what. Only Colin Firth (being mean, well well, never fancied him before) was the only one posh enough. A minor quibble.

However, this new version is original in a good way. Budapest and Istanbul make better locations than those of LeCarre (Prague and Hong Kong). But sometimes not so good - Guillam, gay? Interesting choice but seemed tangental. The cast is superb and strike all the right notes in suspicion, backbiting and cleverness. Oldman makes a welcome to return to actual acting. He is sort of like a sexy Sir Robin Day - an unassuming bucket of emotion. Astounding. It was a baritone pouty blonde tight-pants contest between Hardy (a great unhinged performance of teh sex) and Cumberbatch (in some 'ooo suits you, sir' flannels he clearly got from John Inman in Grace Brothers ). Firth as mentioned and Mark Strong as Prideaux. I am totally glad they kept the school stuff in there and the way he bashed that poor owl was strangely thrilling . Yes I am weird. Toby Jones (who looks more like a pudding-faced Smiley should be), Kathy Burke, Simon McBurney (in squash whites - pass the mind bleach), John Hurt and the other bald dude were also superb. A cast for the ages.

But there was something (I don't know what exactly) lacking in the thread of narrative. A lot of people in the cinema seemed a bit puzzled. I followed it but I can see if other people (unfamiliar with the Cold War so anyone under 27 really) would struggle. Was it unclear to some? Perhaps some of the younger contributors can let me know.

All in all - a fabulous movie and one that will stand up for repeat viewing.
maian
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 19 2011, 11:21 AM) *
This.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

I doubt there were many Scousers in the service, what. Only Colin Firth (being mean, well well, never fancied him before) was the only one posh enough. A minor quibble.


Stephen Graham? I thought that was an odd bit of casting, since Jerry Westerby is VERY posh in the books, being a son of a lord and everything. Not that there can't be Scouse Lords, I suppose, but it's not something that you would really encounter in the secret service at that time, I guess.
Sean of the Dead
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 19 2011, 11:21 AM) *
This.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

I really enjoyed it - a great intelligent movie and lots of amazing period detail. The director, Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) does an immense job of capturing the essence of the period - if completely omitting the upper-crust Old Boy Network nature of the secret service. The TV series does this a lot better IMO and is more authentic to the reality. I doubt there were many Scousers in the service, what. Only Colin Firth (being mean, well well, never fancied him before) was the only one posh enough. A minor quibble.

However, this new version is original in a good way. Budapest and Istanbul make better locations than those of LeCarre (Prague and Hong Kong). But sometimes not so good - Guillam, gay? Interesting choice but seemed tangental. The cast is superb and strike all the right notes in suspicion, backbiting and cleverness. Oldman makes a welcome to return to actual acting. He is sort of like a sexy Sir Robin Day - an unassuming bucket of emotion. Astounding. It was a baritone pouty blonde tight-pants contest between Hardy (a great unhinged performance of teh sex) and Cumberbatch (in some 'ooo suits you, sir' flannels he clearly got from John Inman in Grace Brothers ). Firth as mentioned and Mark Strong as Prideaux. I am totally glad they kept the school stuff in there and the way he bashed that poor owl was strangely thrilling . Yes I am weird. Toby Jones (who looks more like a pudding-faced Smiley should be), Kathy Burke, Simon McBurney (in squash whites - pass the mind bleach), John Hurt and the other bald dude were also superb. A cast for the ages.

But there was something (I don't know what exactly) lacking in the thread of narrative. A lot of people in the cinema seemed a bit puzzled. I followed it but I can see if other people (unfamiliar with the Cold War so anyone under 27 really) would struggle. Was it unclear to some? Perhaps some of the younger contributors can let me know.

All in all - a fabulous movie and one that will stand up for repeat viewing.


I though it was excellent. While it is a complex narrative, I really didn't think it was confusing or unclear - although, I imagine if you don't pay attention you could get lost.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (maian @ Sep 19 2011, 11:45 AM) *
Stephen Graham? I thought that was an odd bit of casting, since Jerry Westerby is VERY posh in the books, being a son of a lord and everything. Not that there can't be Scouse Lords, I suppose, but it's not something that you would really encounter in the secret service at that time, I guess.


Yes - I thought it was odd. They were very much about the Oxbridge set and anyone who wasn't the 'right sort' was not allowed in the circle. At all. Even Percy Alleline was subject to this. The snobbery was a way to keep secrets and is a major theme in the book. Joss Ackland (of the spunky backback fame) played Jerry in the TV series. Casting that Scouse bloke (good actor though he is) seemed an anachronism. Perhaps these sort of nuances are simply not known or important to non-Brits. Or it is just revisionism to seem more inclusive. I do not agree with that at all.

QUOTE
Not that there can't be Scouse Lords


Well life peers in the Lords are the only ones I would know. Upper-class and Scouse tend not to mix.
empathy-with-beast
As to the missing something in the narrative

I think it some how missed beats around the realisation that all four of them are involved in hiding the informer but only one of them is aware that he is actually a double agent.

I think it did incredibly well as a film. It's something I've been thinking about for days afterwards, but I do think that it dropped a few narrative stitches around the above.

Incidently all of the Alec Guiness ones are on Youtube. That's a wasted day sometime.
maian
Cool! I've got Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy on VHS still, but no idea where the copy of Smiley's People disappeared to.
Raven
Sherlock Holmes

Quite enjoyable, in a switch-off-and-watch kinda of way. Had to keep reminding myself Downey wasn't playing Tony Stark . . .
logger
Heaven's Gate

Whatever you say about Michael Cimino you have to admire his balls.

I chuckled at John Locke doing what he was told to do.

Isabelle Huppert makes me want to move to France, as clearly all French women are awesome.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (empathy-with-beast @ Sep 19 2011, 04:10 PM) *
As to the missing something in the narrative

I think it some how missed beats around the realisation that all four of them are involved in hiding the informer but only one of them is aware that he is actually a double agent.

I think it did incredibly well as a film. It's something I've been thinking about for days afterwards, but I do think that it dropped a few narrative stitches around the above.


This is it. Exactly. I think one extra line of dialogue would have solved all the problems here too.

It stays with you for sure.
Ade
QUOTE (Sostie @ Sep 15 2011, 01:23 PM) *
Probably ZAZ's best film.

100% agree. It always struck me as smarter, and more accomplished than the Airport comedies, and despite it being made only a few years after, it feels far less dated.


QUOTE (Jimmay @ Sep 15 2011, 02:36 PM) *
Chocolate Mousse and Gasoline are always said like the man himself.

I'm not alone in that, then. Huzzah! biggrin.gif So happy to see that much love still perpetuates for Top Secret! It remains probably my all time fave comedy.


"Hey, you forgot your funny dog poo!"

"What funny dog poo?"

Sharif's wonky grimace at that juncture always used to have me creased up. So many other comic highlights too, mind.


QUOTE (Sean of the Dead @ Sep 19 2011, 12:22 PM) *
I though it was excellent. While it is a complex narrative, I really didn't think it was confusing or unclear - although, I imagine if you don't pay attention you could get lost.

Which is why people who talk through films at the cinema should be shot.


One is really looking forward to seeing Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy now.
gulfcoast_highwayman
It's 'phony dog poo', although it works either way.

And 'I'm hungry' is one of my favourite lines ever.
Ade
QUOTE (gulfcoast_highwayman @ Sep 19 2011, 08:44 PM) *
It's 'phony dog poo', although it works either way.

Omar's accent. My excuse, stickin' to it, etc. happy.gif
Jimmay
QUOTE (Ade @ Sep 19 2011, 07:56 PM) *
Omar's accent. My excuse, stickin' to it, etc. happy.gif


I'm pretty sure it's "funny dog poo." That's certainly how I've always said it.

EDIT: Apparently it is phony dog poo. Ah well, you can't teach an old dog new tricks and I'm sticking with funny.
Hobbes
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 19 2011, 11:21 AM) *
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

I followed it but I can see if other people (unfamiliar with the Cold War so anyone under 27 really) would struggle. Was it unclear to some? Perhaps some of the younger contributors can let me know.

All in all - a fabulous movie and one that will stand up for repeat viewing.


Just got back from this, and followed the plot without much of a problem (outside of the obvious process of trying in vain to second-guess what's around the corner), despite my tender 22 years. I agree wholeheartedly with your assessment, although I have never read the book or seen any of the previous adaptations so some of the qualms others have highlighted don't really resonate with me. The direction, acting, aesthetic and sound were all top-notch, and it's nice to see Alfredson bring that same grim flair which made Let the Right One In so wonderful to this production; good to see a director with a signature.

One of the best films I've seen this year, may even be in contention for top spot. I really want to see it again. Superior filmmaking.
Atara
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Ace


Red State

Ace

He's Just not that into you?

Shite
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE
Just got back from this, and followed the plot without much of a problem (outside of the obvious process of trying in vain to second-guess what's around the corner), despite my tender 22 years.


Yes but you and Sean have been wee clever clogs since the cradle. Lewis summed up the problem I had with the narrative. Not really the time period.

QUOTE (Hobbes @ Sep 19 2011, 09:16 PM) *
The direction, acting, aesthetic and sound were all top-notch, and it's nice to see Alfredson bring that same grim flair which made Let the Right One In so wonderful to this production; good to see a director with a signature.


"Grim flair" is a great summation. He really works best in winter environments so Istanbul as a location proved much more atmospheric and suitable. It kind of reminded me of Don't Look Now in terms of colour scheme and images. And my friend is now in love with the girl who played Irina. With the mole. She was pretty awesome and very beautiful. The scene with Mark Strong was utterly shocking.

The period detail was superb. I found myself drawn to an old Ajax carton on a ledge. My gran had that in her house.
Hobbes
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 20 2011, 12:21 PM) *
"Grim flair" is a great summation. He really works best in winter environments so Istanbul as a location proved much more atmospheric and suitable. It kind of reminded me of Don't Look Now in terms of colour scheme and images. And my friend is now in love with the girl who played Irina. With the mole. She was pretty awesome and very beautiful. The scene with Mark Strong was utterly shocking.

The period detail was superb. I found myself drawn to an old Ajax carton on a ledge. My gran had that in her house.


I loved the colour palette, much in the same way I loved it in LTROI. He only uses about six or seven colours, and they're all faded and weather-beaten to just the right amount. Great call on Don't Look Now as well, I hadn't thought of that but now that you mention it the similarities come crashing home. What's really amazing is that Alfredson's taken a story of espionage and super-spies and turned into a frank, bleak reality: there's absolutely no glamour associated with the characters or their actions or their jobs, even though they are (in the main) extremely cool. Played the period absolutely fantastically (I went with my parents who absolutely ate the small details up), but drained it of all the bright colours/patterns we associate with it, which makes it feel like the spies' view of the world, instead of the wild 70s London people regale us about.

Every time I see Mark Strong in a film I am impressed. Always in the supporting cast but always superb too, like an English Steve Buscemi. He's got a fantastic gravelly voice as well, worked perfectly for the part, especially when he recounts getting tortured: guy's got some of the deepest-set features I've seen as well, which adds to his gravitas in such moments. The whole cast were outstanding I thought, kudos to all.

The more I think about this film, the more I like it.
widowspider
It's not out here until the 9th of December! What kind of rubbish is that? Argh!
Serafina_Pekkala
Really? Poor Wids. They may speed it up as it is doing so well.

QUOTE (Hobbes @ Sep 20 2011, 02:13 PM) *
What's really amazing is that Alfredson's taken a story of espionage and super-spies and turned into a frank, bleak reality: there's absolutely no glamour associated with the characters or their actions or their jobs, even though they are (in the main) extremely cool.


Yes - very much. It is the anti-Roger Moore.

QUOTE
Every time I see Mark Strong in a film I am impressed. Always in the supporting cast but always superb too, like an English Steve Buscemi. He's got a fantastic gravelly voice as well, worked perfectly for the part, especially when he recounts getting tortured: guy's got some of the deepest-set features I've seen as well, which adds to his gravitas in such moments.


He was superb and has this amazing face like a Roman coin. Even his hairpiece didn't bother me as it normally does. I like him being a baddy-goody more than baddy-baddy. The scene were Colin Firth just smiles at him at the Christmas party nailed all the emotions in one look. Their dynamic was very believable. All the interaction worked well. The torture scenes were also the right side of scary and real - right down to the shit wallpaper and Matryoshka guards in red lipstick. He should get a BAFTA.

I am still puzzled and amused over the choice of end music too.
Hobbes
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 20 2011, 03:16 PM) *
He was superb and has this amazing face like a Roman coin.


Ha! That's the perfect description of it. Nice work teh sefz.

I also feel your pain Rach. I really want to see Moneyball, which is out this week in the US but not until November here.
widowspider
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Sep 20 2011, 02:16 PM) *
Really? Poor Wids. They may speed it up as it is doing so well.

I ruddy bloody hope so.
maian
They'll be leaving it so late because that late-November to early-January period is the prime Oscar contention spot, so they probably won't move it.
gulfcoast_highwayman
QUOTE (Hobbes @ Sep 20 2011, 02:13 PM) *
Every time I see Mark Strong in a film I am impressed. Always in the supporting cast but always superb too, like an English Steve Buscemi.



He's good value in 'The Guard' too, playing, as you say, in a supporting role, but he still stands out.

BTW, I recommed 'The Guard' highly. It's a cracking little film.
Hobbes
QUOTE (gulfcoast_highwayman @ Sep 20 2011, 07:40 PM) *
He's good value in 'The Guard' too, playing, as you say, in a supporting role, but he still stands out.

BTW, I recommed 'The Guard' highly. It's a cracking little film.


I have seen it, and completely agree on both fronts. Some of his dialogue is fantastic, but he plays the disillusionment absolutely perfectly.

The Guard is one of my favourite films this year, laughed pretty much the entire time. The milkshake scene especially made me chuckle.
maian
I love the scene where Mark Strong gets really, really angry about improper bribe etiquette. Mainly because it's something that annoys me in films all the time; of course the money would all be there, otherwise it's not the amount agreed upon, therefore not a real bribe. Stupid fictional people.
Serafina_Pekkala
I think I now love Mark Strong.

I saw the film again.
Hobbes
The woman who plays Irina is also lah-ver-ly I thought. Plus her real name is Svetlana. I believe the term is 'cor blimey'.

Here she is. She's possibly the most Russian-looking woman ever born. Good work spies:
Serafina_Pekkala
She is super pretty and very Russian looking. But my friend noted that she and Tom Hardy look like siblings in the film.
logger
The Social Network

It was better than I remembered but not by much. This time I realised that Sorkin's script wasn't the problem, it's actually a pretty good script, it's just that it was wrong for this film, or at least the film that Fincher was making, turning sharp, witty dialogue into something that's cheesey and lame.

I still don't really get all the fuss about it, well, maybe I do but if I'm right then that depresses me.

I also watched Network today. That film just gets better and better.
Jon 79
QUOTE (logger @ Sep 22 2011, 02:13 AM) *
The Social Network

It was better than I remembered but not by much. This time I realised that Sorkin's script wasn't the problem, it's actually a pretty good script, it's just that it was wrong for this film, or at least the film that Fincher was making, turning sharp, witty dialogue into something that's cheesey and lame.

I still don't really get all the fuss about it, well, maybe I do but if I'm right then that depresses me.

I also watched Network today. That film just gets better and better.


Having watched The Social Network and then Network, surely the next one to watch would be The Net.
Jimmay
QUOTE (Jon 79 @ Sep 22 2011, 08:21 AM) *
Having watched The Social Network and then Network, surely the next one to watch would be The Net.


Then ET. And I'm spent.
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