Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Cinemexperience: part deux.
Spaced Out Forum > Media > Media
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
maian
Coffee and Cigarettes (2003)

I haven't watched Jim Jarmusch's collection of vignettes in which famous people talk about assorted topics over coffee and cigarettes for about six years but a discussion about it at work made me decide to revisit it. I enjoyed it more than the first time - and I really liked it then - largely because I have a better sense of who, say, Steven Wright and Roberto Benigni are than I did the first time, so seeing them talking and knowing how different their personas are made the interactions much richer. Some of the sequences still don't work - Cousins, in which Cate Blanchett plays both herself and a near identical cousin isn't funny or insightful enough to justify its premise - and the three origianl films (Wright/Buscemi, Lee/Lee/Buscemi, Iggy Pop/Tom Waits) remain the strongest since they feel like they have had more time spent on them or less like they are conforming to formula, but the subsequent ones still have great moments. The changing dynamics between Steve Coogan and Alfred Molina in their segment, in particular, are very well handled, and there's a shambolic joy to seeing Bill Murray hanging out with GZA and RZA.

Mixed, but more good verging on great than boring verging on bad.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (widowspider @ Oct 17 2011, 06:22 PM) *
Oh god, the milkshake bit was brilliant. His brain freeze had me cackling! Mark was fabulous.


I think I should see this film.
PrincessKate
I watched films over the weekend, most unusual for moi.

When Evil Calls was as rubbish as I expected, but it did have Sean "My Dad was Doctor Who you know" Pertwee as a sort of Cryptkeeper/storyteller figure, repetitive lesbianism and Harry Welsh from Band of Brothers sporting a ridiculous moustache. I think it has some worth as a film to watch and relentlessly take the piss out of. Elf was brilliant, if a bit unseasonal.
Sostie
Captain America
Want to make a rollicking, superhero film set in 1940s? Why not get the guy who made Rocketeer in to make it? Great choice.
Really really enjoyed it.
I hope there's a reboot soon so we can have a Howling Commandos, Union Jack or Invaders film.
NiteFall
QUOTE (Sostie @ Oct 19 2011, 01:48 PM) *
I hope there's a reboot soon so we can have a Howling Commandos, Union Jack or Invaders film.


Yes! But only if they keep Buck Compton as Dum Dum Dugan.

EDIT- Ooh, a quick look about reveals that they're planning on making a Nick Fury film after The Avengers which will use the classic anti-aging magic serum story from the comics so they can reuse all those characters in another WW2 setting. Hope that's true.
widowspider
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Oct 19 2011, 12:23 PM) *
I think I should see this film.

You should.
logger
Underground

I can't believe I've never heard of this film before, only finding out about it by looking up epics on imdb after watching Lawrence of Arabia over the weekend. An absolutely amazing, anarchic, satirical, epic spanning 50 years from the German occupation of Belgrade to the collapse of Yugoslavia into civil war and genocide in the 90s. It's like a Marx Bros film on crack, and I don't think it's hyperbole to say that the three leads could give the brothers a run for their money in this film, they are incredible, I'm now a little bit in love with Mirjana Jokovic. Whilst there are questions about the historical accuracy and political motives of the people who made it, as a stand alone film it's a wonder and a worthy indictment of war in general.

This is a brilliant film, you really should watch it. I hope they make the five hour, director's cut available one day.
maian
Melancholia

I liked it, I guess. "Like" isn't really the correct phrase, I suppose. I was talking to someone from work about it and we both agreed that there are elements of it that are sublime (the opening and the finale, in particular, are visually stunning and thematically perfect) and I thought that the second half was really fascinating in its examination of the conflict between faith and oblivion, but as a whole piece it didn't really hang together. Still, the performances are great, particularly from Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg, and it is one of Lars' more visually arresting works. I think I need to think about it more.

We Need To Talk About Kevin

Having not read the book, but loving Lynne Ramsay, I didn't really know what to expect. I liked the film a lot, but I also thought that it was pretty majorly flawed. In that respect it made for a nice companion piece to Melancholia, even if as far as double-bills go it is hardly the most light-hearted.
logger
I can't work out if Mesrine is some kind of bizarre French comedy that I'm not getting or if it's just inept. Either way it's silly and I'm giving up on it.
Shack
Funny People

Another film in the Punch Drunk Love category, proving Sandler can act but also another that increases my fondness for him when he's not just being Adam Sandler. I really liked this, Seth Rogen is great and a spin off starring Jonah Hill and Jason Schwartzmann in "Yo Teach!" would be welcomed.

Funny and almost tragic throughout. Loved it.

And no-one was more surprised than I.

ADD - Eric Bana is AWESOME.
maian
We hosted a horror film festival this weekend and despite working every day I managed to catch these two:

Dust Devil: The Director's Cut

Richard Stanley's nutty and meditative tale of an evil spirit travelling across Namibia, the woman he seduces and the policeman tracking him down. The plot is fairly standard, even if the African spiritual stuff does give it a distinct flavour, but the thing that set it apart for me was the weird pacing and tone to it. It starts off in a grand guignol style with the Dust Devil himself murdering a woman then smearing the walls of her house with her own blood, but then the violence recedes and it becomes more sedate and creepy, to the point that by the end it's so low on incident and high on weirdness that it feels more like something like Stalker than any tradictional horror film.

Strange, atmospheric and weird. Not a lost classic or anything, but definitely a fascinating oddysey.

Some Guy Who Kills People

Horror-comedy produced by John Landis in which a man recently released from a menbtal institution (Kevin Corrigan, familiar to fans of Fringe as Sam Weiss and fans of Community as Professor Professorson) tries to put his life back together by reconnecting with his estranged daughter, dating a pretty English girl (Lucy Davis) and dealing with his pain and anger by viciously murdering the people who he blames for ruining his life.

As far as horror-comedies go, Some Guy Who Kills People manages the balance better than most, aiming for more of the former than the later by making even the gruesome killings silly rather than genuinely disturbing, and delivering a true masterstroke by casting Barry Bostwick as the perpetually eating, constantly fascinated local sheriff. Corrigan is great in the central role, too, but I came away from the film quoting Bostwick's lines almost verbatim and I couldn't really remember much of what Corrigan said.
omni
The Brothers Bloom - 2008

Rian Johnson made Brick, which is in my opinion a perfect film. TBB is about two con men who run cons like Dostoyevsky writes novels. It's a lot of fun, though all the rookie filmmaker mistakes dodged in Brick ended up landing here. Adrien Brody and Rachel Weisz are great, but Rinko Kikuchi0 steals the film as the slightly mad/often mute explosions expert. If Hudon Hawk were a good film, it would be this. And I love Hudson Hawk.
maian
Tokyo Godfathers

Anime from the late, lamented Satoshi Kon about three homeless people who discover an abandoned baby on Christmas Eve and set about trying to figure out who her parents are and why they would abandon their child. As they search, they reveal things about themselves and their pasts, and the film investigates the role that fate, love and connection plays in our lives. I can't really say anything more other than it's one of the best films I have seen in a while. It's beautifully animated, laugh out loud funny, heartbreakingly sad and occasionally profound. A wonderful film that just made me all the more sad that we aren't going to see any more works from Kon.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn

I loved it. The animation served the story beautifully, making for some of the most exhilarating action scenes of Spielberg's career, the story was bunkum but it was entertaining bunkum, and the voice cast were all excellent. The villain was pretty ineffective, but apart from that I had almost no major problems with it. Terrific fun.
GundamGuy_UK
QUOTE (maian @ Oct 25 2011, 10:32 PM) *
Tokyo Godfathers

Anime from the late, lamented Satoshi Kon about three homeless people who discover an abandoned baby on Christmas Eve and set about trying to figure out who her parents are and why they would abandon their child. As they search, they reveal things about themselves and their pasts, and the film investigates the role that fate, love and connection plays in our lives. I can't really say anything more other than it's one of the best films I have seen in a while. It's beautifully animated, laugh out loud funny, heartbreakingly sad and occasionally profound. A wonderful film that just made me all the more sad that we aren't going to see any more works from Kon.


It's a very good film indeed. Speaking of great anime movies, yesterday I showed a friend of mine Akira. I hadn't seen it in ages, and I'd forgotten that it's every bit as perfect as people say. It is stunningly beautiful; the backgrounds are all incredible, and certain little bits (Tetsuo's bandage, the riot troops' gas, and my personal favourite the pipes flying around blowing steam from Akira's chamber) are so well animated they just defy belief. My friend said it was "hyper-realistic"; you know it's not real, but it's drawn so well that you don't notice how well it's drawn, because the movement is so fluid and real. Even if it were made today it would be considered one of the best-drawn films of all time, and to this day I don't really think anything has ever topped it. As for the actual film, it's not nearly as incomprehensible as some people say; it just doesn't hold your hand at all or give you any clues, and it definitely requires at least two viewings to get it.
logger
The Village

This could be the definitive Shamalam movie, showcasing the good, the bad and the dumb that he's so famous for. But never mind that, look how awesome the cast is.
Julie
I saw Ghostbusters in the cinema last night. It's even more awesome on the big screen and I'd be hard pressed to think of many films that I love more than this. It also made me want to smoke, really badly.
Raven
^ Why?

I'd like to see Ghostbusters in the cinema again, but it's not coming to a screen near me, that I know of.
maian
Ali (2001)

I couldn't help but compare it to Spike Lee's Malcolm X, which did a similar job of charting the life of an important figure in African-American history but made for a superior film because it seemed to have more passion behind it. Michael Mann's film is technically better, since Mann's such a master of composition and sound that his films can't help but look and sound amazing, but it's an overly dry examination of a man who was anything but dry. Will Smith does capture a lot of the energy and charisma of Ali, and he also conveys a lot of the physicality of him in the boxing scenes that litter the film, but everything outside of him feels very cold and academic, as if Mann wanted to tell the story but not really engage with it. By no means a bad film, but not the film that its subject deserved.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

Terrific. A quartet of great performances from Richard Burton (who does a wonderful job of slowly ratcheting up from the meek, browbeaten man of the opening scenes to the biting tormenter of the last act), Elizabeth Taylor (who manages to be both a force of nature and a woman of incredibly fragility at the same time), George Segal and Sandy Dennis. It feels very much like an adaptation of a play, with Mike Nichols doing very little to open the film up to make it more cinematic, but the cast are so magnetic, generating tension and menace from thin air, that you hardly notice.
GundamGuy_UK
Tintin - I enjoyed it. It was a bit relentless, but I took that to be an homage to the old cartoon serials where there was a cliffhanger every five minutes. It felt like a story of those all strung together, so it was set piece after set piece with exposition in between. It looked great, it was acted great, the story kept me interested. Just don't expect it to be Spielberg's best directing, or Moffat's best writing.
maian
I genuinely think that the Morrocan port chase and the pirate flashback are two the best things Spielberg has ever done. At the very least they make brilliant use of the animation style, justifying the use of performance capture in a way that little else in the film does. (I like the rest of the film, but most of it is stuff that could have been done in live action.)

Phenomena
(1985)

Dario Argento film in which Jennifer Connelly tracks down a killer using her abilities to psychically summon insects. Fucking mental, but a lot of fun. Also features Donald Pleasance and a monkey.
Silky
Batman - Year One.
An animated adaptation of one of the best Batman comics (I refuse to call them 'graphic novels') that sticsk pretty close to the source material. Looks good and a great story. Well worth a look.
Sostie
The People vs George Lucas
A documentary about what Star Wars meant to fans when it came out, and their fandom since, the reactions to special editions and the prequels. It's very interesting throughout (particularly enjoyed the parts about the Special Editions). Came to the following conclusions....it's Lucas' films and he should do what he wants with them, but don't be a hypocrite in the process. Oh, and some Star wars fans should really get out more.
Rebus
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

Overwhelmingly meh. Not a whole lot actually happens, and while seeing Lovejoy as Blackbeard was great, no one really looked like they were really trying. Depp really phoned it in and I guess must just be laughing all the way to the bank. They really need to stop making these now. I think I'll just stick with my copy of the first one and leave it at that for any future viewings.
logger
Scream

The best one, a classic horror film and has to be somewhere in my top 50 films of the 90s, probably top half.


Scream 2

The worst one. Where the first film had a brilliantly crafted, well thought out script with sharp, witty, scathing dialogue this feels very rushed and is really just another slasher. The odd highlights are mainly the Stab clips with Tori Spelling a nice call back to the first film and Luke Wilson playing Skeet Ulrich playing Billy Loomis.


Scream 3

An improvement on 2 but still a disappointment compared to 1. A new writer brings a touch of vitality to the script and after the path the previous film trod this is able to get away with being as cartoony as it is. It also helped that I remembered the killer being somebody different, (although the same motive). Parker Posey is the main highlight.


Scre4m

A lot of people didn't seem to like this and the less than favourable reviews and my memories of the sequels had put me off seeing this until now. I have to say I liked it, it feels like the true sequel to the original, although still nowhere near as good but much better than 2 or 3. It goes back to the formula that worked so well, crafted set pieces, scares, characters that you cared about and killings that were both dark and tragic yet visceral and fun. The script is funny, the cast is the best looking of all the films (at least the girls are, I can't really say the same about the guys), Alison Brie is always great, Marley Shelton needs to be in more films and I'm really digging Claire-Bear's short hair. Overall, I was very pleasantly surprised by this film, almost as much as I was surprised to see Simon Pegg and Nick Frost in it.

So, for all those keeping count, 1 is easily the best, followed by 4, then 3 then 2, although you could skip those if you wanted to.

edit;

One of the things I liked throughout was the evolution of Sidney which felt pretty consistent although I would like to think that by the time I'm facing the sixth person trying to kill me that I would be constantly armed with a big fucking gun.
GundamGuy_UK
Dawn of the Dead - The original one, not the Synder remake.

I don't really know what to say about it other than watch it if you haven't already. If you're a zombie fan, you should be ashamed of yourself if you've never seen it. If you're not a zombie fan, give it a watch and it may well surprise you (keep with it during the somewhat shaky start; once they get to the mall it gets much better). And if you have seen it, you don't need me to tell you how good it is.
Hobbes
I just watched Half Nelson which is currently on the iPlayer. I really enjoyed it, loved the story and Ryan Gosling is brilliant in it. Now just need to see Lars and the Real Girl to get my pre-megastardom Gosling indie collection completed.
Sostie
Killer Elite
A good old fashioned thriller in the vein of something Frederick Forsythe might have come up with, except a little more violent. Good to see the stars of the two greatest action films of this century (Crank and Shoot'Em Up - if you disagree you're very wrong) beating several shades of shit ouit of each other. Good stuff
Ade
Tintin

Fecking brilliant. Went to see this on Monday evening, in 3D too, and loved every freakin' minute of it. Great fun, pure escapist adventure, and a decent script to boot. I really hope the planned trilogy comes to fruition.


QUOTE (Hobbes @ Nov 1 2011, 11:04 PM) *
I just watched Half Nelson which is currently on the iPlayer. I really enjoyed it, loved the story and Ryan Gosling is brilliant in it. Now just need to see Lars and the Real Girl to get my pre-megastardom Gosling indie collection completed.

I do like Gosling as an actor, but man, this bored the fuck out of me when I saw it a year or so back. Sorry, young sir, but it just draaaaaaagged interminably, and I lost total interest before the end was even within sight.
Hobbes
*shrugs, makes Gallic 'bof' gesture* I liked it. It's extraordinarily navel-gazing at points, but didn't bother me, largely because I thought Gosling and Shareeka Epps were excellent and it really made me laugh; I found parts of it to be awash with thoroughly enjoyable gallows humour/images, alongside the grimmer moments.

Maybe it's because I'm a member of the target audience (students/graduates who think they're cleverer than they really are).
Sean of the Dead
Tintin
Fun fun (obviously) and there are two utterly astounding moments within it that amazed, delighted and astounded me, as well as a brilliant opening credits sequence. However, I did have a problem with the lack of a breather between the amazing single shot African chase scene and the final action scene, as it made the latter feel considerably less climactic, and very much like it wasn't the final action sequence. The pacing was a little bit off in some ways, but it's so lovingly and charmingly and funnily done that it didn't really bother me.
Ade
QUOTE (Sean of the Dead @ Nov 3 2011, 01:58 AM) *
Tintin
Fun fun (obviously) and there are two utterly astounding moments within it that amazed, delighted and astounded me, as well as a brilliant opening credits sequence. However, I did have a problem with the lack of a breather between the amazing single shot African chase scene and the final action scene, as it made the latter feel considerably less climactic, and very much like it wasn't the final action sequence. The pacing was a little bit off in some ways, but it's so lovingly and charmingly and funnily done that it didn't really bother me.

Yes, you are right about the [spoilered bit] aspect... but I felt it was a very minor detraction in the grand scheme of things. With any luck though, Jackson's knack for exposition might temper this somewhat when he takes the directorial reigns for the second instalment.


eta: Teehee, and I just remembered the 'Jaws' reference moment. I didn't twig that's what it was while I was watching the film, and even though I laughed at it at the time, the penny has just this minute dropped. It's only been about 60 hours... I'm fairly sure that's a 'penny drop delay' record, for me.
logger
Dead Ringers

If I ever join a dating site I'm going to say this is my favourite film, that'll work out for the best, right?
Serafina_Pekkala
The Silence

A thriller set in the golden summers of south Germany where a young girl goes missing and her death echoes an identical murder twenty years before. Genuinely terrifying picture of crime, scary things, murderers and all the breakdown that follows. Nothing at all melodramatic about it either and yet, that works and gives an oppressive yet ordinary atmosphere. Just fucking creepyifying with some astounding performances from the cast. Think of the paedo from Happiness and the murderer from the original The Vanishing together and hanging out. The director, the interestingly named Baran Bo Oder is a talent to watch. And probably closer to Lynne Ramsey's idea of The Lovely Bones than we will ever get.
logger
Devil

Cheesey horror fun, sometimes laughable and complete with M. Night twists and turns, it still manages to be enjoyable silliness.
Ade
The Next Three Days
A more than half decent thriller from Paul Haggis, and a remake of the French original Anything For Her, which overall I much preferred. For the subtitle phobic though, this version isn't half bad.
logger
Unstoppable

It stops.
Sean of the Dead
Spoilers man!
logger
I didn't say how it stops.
maian
Wuthering Heights (2011)

I won't say too much about it since I've already written four separate reviews of it for different websites, so am a little bit tired of talking about it, but it is very, very good. It pretty throws into question every presumption of how to do a period piece/literary adaptation with a bracingly modern and uncomfortable style that will be familiar to anyone who has seen Red Road or Fish Tank. The acting is a little suspect - none of the non-professionals can hold a candle to Katie Jarvis as far as young leads in Andrea Arnold films go - but that's not the focus of the film. It's more about atmosphere and sensuality than acting and character, and on those terms it suceeds. Fans of the novel will probably not care for the swearing or the lack o romanticism, but I found it to be really effective.


Michael Clayton (2007)


Geogre Clooney plays a fixer for a law firm who is called in when his friend (Tom Wilkinson) has a breakdown in the middle of a meeting with some high profile clients. From there he discovers that the corporation his firm works for may not be squeaky clean and is drawn into a web of deceit and murky dealings that threatens the lives of everyone it touches.

The plot machinations aren't much too write home about - corporations are teh evols is hardly new ground - but the acting, style and atmosphere are brilliant. Director Tony Gilroy slowly ratchets up the tension over the course of the film whilst revealing just enough details about the characters to make them interesting, but not enough so as to make them predictable. Clooney's a solid, unshowy core for the film, but Tom Wilkinson steals the show as his raving friend, and Tilda Swinton is typically icy as the representative of the corporation who finds herself driven into taking extreme action without really considering the consequences.
sweetbutinsane
QUOTE (logger @ Nov 5 2011, 10:39 PM) *
Unstoppable

It stops.
QUOTE (Sean of the Dead @ Nov 6 2011, 01:52 AM) *
Spoilers man!
QUOTE (logger @ Nov 6 2011, 11:58 AM) *
I didn't say how it stops.


That made my day. laugh.gif
Ade
QUOTE (sweetbutinsane @ Nov 6 2011, 07:58 PM) *
That made my day. laugh.gif

It gave me chuckles also. biggrin.gif
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (maian @ Nov 6 2011, 07:16 PM) *


My version would be called Withering Hates and have 2 pointless shouty people as Tubbs and Edward.

RocknRolla

Pointless enjoyable mockney nonsense from Mr Ritchie. I find hating on his films to be rather boring and predictable now - especially since he is very professional and has some amazing action sequences. The cast was great and the whole look was slick and stylish and contained a hilarious dance sequence. Okay it is basically the plot of Lock Stock re-written with some Russians and the script contained the odd moment of stupidness. And it appeared that Thandie Newton was on Qualuudes but I can't complain. She was great BTW and managed rather well in a sea of blokes. Tom Wilkinson makes a great villain and the gang - Leonidas, Stringer Bell, Bronson and SuperHans - all meshed. Plus, Toby Kebbell from Dead Man's Shoes (yes - he played Anthony the brother - can you believe?) was unrecognisable and kinda stole the show and should be in more films. He scrubs up rather well too. I hope they make a sequel one day.
Ade
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Nov 7 2011, 01:43 PM) *
RocknRolla

Pointless enjoyable mockney nonsense from Mr Ritchie. I find hating on his films to be rather boring and predictable now - especially since he is very professional and has some amazing action sequences. The cast was great and the whole look was slick and stylish and contained a hilarious dance sequence. Okay it is basically the plot of Lock Stock re-written with some Russians and the script contained the odd moment of stupidness. And it appeared that Thandie Newton was on Qualuudes but I can't complain. She was great BTW and managed rather well in a sea of blokes. Tom Wilkinson makes a great villain and the gang - Leonidas, Stringer Bell, Bronson and SuperHans - all meshed. Plus, Toby Kebbell from Dead Man's Shoes (yes - he played Anthony the brother - can you believe?) was unrecognisable and kinda stole the show and should be in more films. He scrubs up rather well too. I hope they make a sequel one day.

I quite agree there. I've long been a fan of Lock Stock and Snatch, so I never quite grasped what all the Ritchie hatred was about anyway. But still, after the hilariously abysmal Swept Away and overblown nonsense that was Revolver, I was left more disappointed than disillusioned with Mr Ritchie. RocknRolla was, then, a surprisingly and mercifully excellent dose of rollicking fun - far better than I'd hoped it would or could be; definitely a return to form. Confidence thus restored: Guy had redeemed himself rather nicely, I thought.

And a sequel would certainly be most welcome.
Serafina_Pekkala
QUOTE (Ade @ Nov 7 2011, 10:46 PM) *
And a sequel would certainly be most welcome.


It would. Revolver and Swept Away were pretty terrible but since he left Madonna, he has got his form back. Funny how she does that.

Sostie
RocknRolla was great fun. Particularly liked the Newton/Butler dance sequence.

As for Revolver, I like it. Over ambitious yes, and a bit crap towards the end, but it ain't all bad. It's also the first of The Stath's Arguing With Himself In A Lift Trilogy. The second being Crank, the third not yet made
Serafina_Pekkala
You just love The Stath. For you.

Why he not your avatar?
Ade
QUOTE (Serafina_Pekkala @ Nov 8 2011, 02:02 PM) *
It would. Revolver and Swept Away were pretty terrible but since he left Madonna, he has got his form back. Funny how she does that.

He has ex-or-caaahhhzed the dee-munnnz-ah!


Sorry, went a bit deep south there.
maian
Hard Eight/Sydney (1996)

I decided to rewatch Paul Thomas Anderson's often maligned debut to see if it was as rubbish as I remembered it being and it totally wasn't! It's not on a par with the works that followed it, but as a stylish mix of character study, noir and chamber piece it works really well. Philip Baker Hall is superb, John C. Reilly is adorable and Gwynnie is tolerable, whilst the moody look and woozy, laidback feel give it a distinct feel. It'd never happen, but I would like to see a sequel picking up with these characters years later and seeing where they are in their lives.


Mr Brooks (2007)

Dark, fun and pulpy thriller in which Kevin Costner plays a serial killer who has spent years suppressing his murderous urges (represented by a supremely creepy William Hurt) but gives in to them once more, which in turn causes him to come to the attention of a potential killer in waiting (Dane Cook) who wants Mr Brooks to be his mentor, as well as a policewoman (Demi Moore) who is dealing with her own personal problems. It's a little bit messy in places - Moore's character felt like little more than an after-thought since she never really engaged with the central storyline, which was much more focused on how Brooks relates to his family and Cook's character - but in general the atmosphere and darkly comic interplay between Costner and Hurt carries the film along nicely.


Naked Lunch (1991)

Something something two things wrong with that title something something.

It was interesting seeing someone try to adapt a book that completely defies adaptation, especially once it became clear that David Cronenberg was merely using elements of the novel and interweaving it with William S. Burrough's real life to create a commentary on the creation of the book and the life of its creator, but it wasn't all that satisfying as a work in its own right. The effects are pretty disgusting and it looks very good, but it's ultimately a weird, sort of successful experiment that I don't think I'll revisit very often.


The Thin Blue Line (1988)

Compelling documentary that delves into the murder of Texas police office in 1976 and the resulting investigation and trial. Eroll Morris interviews all the key figures in the case - the man accused of the murder, the police and lawyers, the "witnesses" called at the trial - and uses their words, court documents and reconstructions to create a murky story of deceit, corruption and a misguided pursuit of justice. Morris doesn't editorialise or shape the narrative to present one side as right or wrong right until the end, in the process turning the film into a mystery in which the audience is left to decipher who is telling the truth and who is lying, as well as why they might be lying.

Really gripping and exciting, it should be on iPlayer from tomorrow.
logger
The Life Aquatic

It always fills me with such sweet melancholy.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.