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Sir_Robin_the_brave
If there's one thing I love in the world its Discworld books (and to a lesser extent the comp games). Anyone else an avid Pratchett reader or occasional dabbler?. If so what are you're favourite books? - I can't fault the City Watch novels 'Guards Guards' 'Men At Arms' etc although the last one 'Going Postal' was a definite return to form after the rather dodgy 'Thief of Time'. Anyone else interested? anyone?
Julie
I'm a big Pratchett fan because of his effort in Good Omens. So I picked up Thief of Time and couldn't get into it. If it's a rather dodgy one, as you say, should I read the first one instead? (I didn't realize at the time that it was part of a series)
Sir_Robin_the_brave
Good Omens is a very good book I'd agree with you on that, finished re-reading it a few weeks ago and still think Crowley is a great Pratchett/Gaiman character. Oddly the Discworld books start off on a slightly uneven footing, its widely acknowledged that the first book isn't the greatest although things do pick up in the light fantastic (2nd book). That carries on the story from the first book though so its probably best to start there. After the first five/six you could probably flip around the series but you will lose track of the various 'inventions' that are introduced in various novels as well as the development of some leading characters if you head too far forwards.
flakmonkey
Ha ha! What a brilliant topic! I think you'll find probably about half of us here are fans. Yep I love Mr Pratchett and his work. The man is an utter genius! My fave books are probably... (now this is a toughie) Night Watch, Feet of Clay, Monstrous Regiment and er... Witches Abroad. But I adore them all! My favourite characters are Sam Vimes and Nanny Ogg. biggrin.gif
Raven
Thief of Time is more or less a stand alone novel but I wouldn't say it was one of the best to ease into the Discworld with.

You could start at the beginning with The Colour of Magic and work your way through but I found his first two books, although good, to be a little cliché at times.

He didn't really get going - to my mind - until Equal Rites came out and he jumped up another notch with the excellent Mort.

If you are looking for an easy starter though I'd recommend Guards! Guards! as it's really just a detective novel set in a fantasy environment.

Either way I'd recommend you reading further as I've not read a duff Pratchett book yet!
Sir_Robin_the_brave
Oh and Small Gods is really good as well - a cleverly written book but also most amusing.
superfurryandy
Any of the City Watch books which can be read as a series on their own, really.

Guards Guards
Men At Arms
Feet Of Clay
Jingo
The Fifth Elephant
Night Watch

I think that's all of them - anyway, I love the way that the characters develop through the series, especially Vimes & Carrott.
ella
I love Pratchett. He is my favourite writer. Favourite character used to be Death, and still is up to a point, but I think that I am beginning to appreciate Vimes more.

I am planning on collecting them all again (lost a few copies over the years) and having a read through from the beginning.
superfurryandy
Vimes is brilliant - he's reminds me of me, only slightly less jaded.
ella
He is a character for the world weary. biggrin.gif I just love the fact that he gets thrown into all this upper class stuff and he actually just wants to go out and and pound the streets like a normal copper.

And I love the way he deals with Vetinari (who I also like - so manipulative)
Chapman Baxter
QUOTE (Raven @ Apr 18 2005, 09:20 PM)
You could start at the beginning with The Colour of Magic and work your way through but I found his first two books, although good, to be a little cliché at times.

He didn't really get going - to my mind - until Equal Rites came out and he jumped up another notch with the excellent Mort.
*


Well, Pratchett started off by parodying existing fantasy stories; off the top of my head, the first parodies Fritz Lieber's Fafhrd and Gray Mouse stories, Anne McCaffrey's Dragon novels, Robert E. Howard's Conan stories, HP Lovecraft and more. They were cliched, but that was the point.

It was only when he wrote Equal Rites and Mort that he started to build a world of his own instead of parodying other peoples, and the humour became much richer, as did the deeper implications of his books.

I always enjoy reading his books, but find the later ones don't have as much impact as the early ones. That said, I think Night Watch is the best thing he's ever done.

If you're looking for a place to start his books, I can do no better than point you to this part of the rec.arts.sf.written FAQ.
AusChick
I have to admit I've never actually read any of Terry Pratchett's books.
My bf is a big fan though so our house is full of them!
I have listened to some of his books on tape (read by Tony "Baldrick" Robinson)

I've also seen Terry Pratchett speak when he was out here in Australia.
He spoke really well and I found him very entertaining (even though I'd not read his books)

i've played the discworld games too. Very cool! Love Eric Idle as Rincewind


Cheers
AC
Blind I/O
I've been known to read the occasional Pratchett book or thirty. Love the pants off 'em.
ianmak
Love the Discworld series, and Good Omens, too...

If you want to know what 'order' to read them in, here are some rather geekish guides...
http://www.ie.lspace.org/books/reading-ord...ides/index.html

But defo read the first 2, then carry on after.
Blind I/O
Or you could read them in release order, according to the list in the front of every book. That way you get to watch his writing style and the Disc develop together.
m0r1arty
Mort was by fr my fav, and I agree with Chapman Baxter about creating his own world with these, although the parodies were excellent too!

Robert Rankin is another funny writer too, worth checking out.

-m0r
ianmak
QUOTE (Blind I/O @ Apr 19 2005, 12:40 PM)
Or you could read them in release order, according to the list in the front of every book. That way you get to watch his writing style and the Disc develop together.
*


Thats how I read them, kind of...the first 2, then Soul Music, then pretty much in order after that!
rebelstar
I'd read them in order - that way you can ease into the world, and you get to read the excellent Mort quite early on. I just realised that I haven't read any of the last three Discworld books - I'm not sure if that's lazyness on my part or if 27 books was enough for me. Hmmm.


And Robert Rankin is an excellent writer - the Brentford Trilogy is one of my favourite serieseses of books.
ella
QUOTE (rebelstar @ Apr 19 2005, 01:02 PM)
I just realised that I haven't read any of the last three Discworld books - I'm not sure if that's lazyness on my part or if 27 books was enough for me. Hmmm.
*


I would recommend them. In my opinion, Night Watch, Monsterous Regiment and Going Postal are some of his best work. Some new character to focus on in the last two which I think refreshes his writing.
rebelstar
QUOTE (ella @ Apr 19 2005, 02:09 PM)
I would recommend them. In my opinion, Night Watch, Monsterous Regiment and Going Postal are some of his best work. Some new character to focus on in the last two which I think refreshes his writing.
*


Night Watch was the last one I read - the bibliography I was looking at includes 'Thud!' which I assume isn't out yet. I'll pick the other two up and add them to my reading pile.
flakmonkey
Oh, you've also gotta love the Nac Mac Feegle. Hilarious! What a great parody of us Scots. biggrin.gif
ella
QUOTE (rebelstar @ Apr 19 2005, 01:19 PM)
Night Watch was the last one I read - the bibliography I was looking at includes 'Thud!' which I assume isn't out yet. I'll pick the other two up and add them to my reading pile.
*


Ooh! Even newer Pratchett.... I will have to keep an eye out of that one.
Amazongirl
Id say im a new fan, watched first half of Soul Music last year.

Borught it as soon as I saw it on dvd.

Still havent finished first book that i treid to read over easter. Death Rules!
rebelstar
The bibliography was here. Looks like Thud! is another City Watch book.
ella
QUOTE (rebelstar @ Apr 19 2005, 01:32 PM)
The bibliography was here. Looks like Thud! is another City Watch book.
*


Lovely! Cheers for the link. I knew that I was saving those Christmas book tokens for something biggrin.gif
ella
QUOTE (flakmonkey @ Apr 19 2005, 01:20 PM)
Oh, you've also gotta love the Nac Mac Feegle. Hilarious! What a great parody of us Scots. biggrin.gif
*


Sorry, double post, but I had to agree with this - I have only read Wee Free Men but I read the whole thing thinking of my tiny Scottish Granny. I think that it added to the reading!
flakmonkey
Nice Ella! biggrin.gif They are great aren't they?
maian
Isn't Thud! the board game released a little while ago, i got it for Xmas and it's a great laugh if your a Pratchett fan.

I started redaing Pratchett a few years ago, i started with Colour of Magic (Actually i started with Night Watch but didn't have a clue who anyone was so i gave up after a while) and it took me a few months to read cos i couldn't really get into it, then i read a few more books, and i think in total it took me 6 months to read every single Discworld book (that had been released at the time)

Absolutely love Pratchett to my mind he is one of the best philosophers but he choosesto write comedic books, which works great! His books are such a great mixture of fantasy and reality as well humour and serious issues (such as Vimes speech at the end of Night Watch in which he talks about why he doesn't want a monument for the dead soldiers, always brings a tear to my eye).

My favourite character would be Vimes, Rincewind or Death, probably Death because he has such a great outlook on life and some of the best lines in the books.

''Isn't my life meant to flash before my eyes?''
''That was it''
''What was?''
''That was your life flashing before your eyes, when you were living it''
(I'm paraphrasing but thats the best i can remember without a book in front of me)

Favourite books....Definitely Night Watch would be there, as would Guards Guards, Men at Arms (its so sad when Detritus' friend dies), Witches Abroad, Pyramids, Small Gods...hell, I love them all!

Is anyone else a fan of his 'Johnny and...' books? Johnny anfd the Dead was the first of his books that i read that wasn't a discworld one, and i got to read it as a play for english, i particularly enjoyed it cos i got to play the Italian ghost (i forget the name) and i put on an absurdly over-the-top italian accent, noone else could read a scene with me for the laughter! Then they made me give up the part sad.gif

Anyway, Terry Pratchett=Genius
Raven
QUOTE (maian @ Apr 19 2005, 06:27 PM)
I started redaing Pratchett a few years ago . . . 
*


Whilst I was writing my post above I realised I've been reading Pratchett books for about 18 years now! wacko.gif
Chapman Baxter
QUOTE (Raven @ Apr 20 2005, 01:46 PM)
Whilst I was writing my post above I realised I've been reading Pratchett books for about 18 years now!  wacko.gif
*


My God, I've just checked when The Colour of Magic was first published - 22 years ago! I didn't read it right away, but I've probably been reading Prachett's book for 20 years. I feel old. ohmy.gif
spacemonkey
Oooh, this thread died a sad death... Pity, I love these books
Stella MM
A timely bumping though. Have you seen this?:

QUOTE (www.bbc.co.uk/news @ 31/07/05)
Pratchett anger at Rowling's rise

Terry Pratchett is the author of the best-selling Discworld series
Author Terry Pratchett has complained that the status of Harry Potter author JK Rowling is being elevated "at the expense of other writers".

Pratchett, one of the UK's most successful novelists with 40 million books sold, said the media ignores the achievements of other fantasy authors.

He also took a sideswipe at Rowling for saying she did not realise Harry Potter was fantasy until it was published.

His comments came on Rowling's 40th birthday, also Harry Potter's birthday.

In a recent interview with Time magazine, Rowling said she was "not a huge fan of fantasy" and was trying to "subvert" the genre.

JK Rowling launching Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
JK Rowling recently launched Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
The magazine also said Rowling reinvented fantasy fiction, which was previously stuck in "an idealised, romanticised, pseudofeudal world, where knights and ladies morris-dance to Greensleeves".

Pratchett, whose first fantasy novel was published 34 years ago, wrote to the Sunday Times saying the genre had always been "edgy and inventive".

"Ever since The Lord of the Rings revitalised the genre, writers have played with it, reinvented it, subverted it and bent it to their times," he wrote.

"It has also contained come of the very best, most accessible writing for children, by writers who seldom get the acknowledgement they deserve."

He also expressed surprise at Rowling's comments that she only realised Harry Potter was fantasy after the first book was published.

"I'm not the world's greatest expert," he wrote, "But I would have thought that the wizards, witches, trolls, unicorns, hidden worlds, jumping chocolate frogs, owl mail, magic food, ghosts, broomsticks and spells would have given her a clue?"

Rowling's latest book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, sold almost nine million copies in the UK and US in its first 24 hours of release on 16 July.

Meanwhile, Rowling celebrated reaching 40 on Sunday, the same day she has given as her young creation's birthday.

The author's website displayed pictures of a birthday cake and birthday card with the words: "Happy birthday Harry Potter."

Fans have been trying to deduce how old he is, with one site saying the boy wizard has now turned 25.


What the hell is the last sentence all about? How can you speculate that Harry's 25, when he's 15 in the books?
ella
Perhaps that the character was first thought of 25 years ago? The character is 25 years old in concept, rather than in the books. Don't know enough about Rowling and her throughts to kow whether that in an accurate guess though.

I love, love, love, the HP books and the films, but I have been a Pratchett fan for years and it does bother me on his behalf that he has been wonderfully prolific and really added to the genre of fantasy fiction and never had the recognition, or success that Rowling has had. When in my opinion, his writing surpasses hers.
Stella MM
Absolutely. She's literary munchkin compared to him and he's been writing brilliant books for years only to get sneered at by most people who think that only 14 year old boys read them.

I did notice that they've reissued some Discworld books with 'adult' covers, in the style of Harry Potter, so this might prompt a wider acceptance of his work. Shallow as it may seem, it was those revolting Josh Kirby covers that put me off reading Pratchett for years.
Raven
QUOTE (Stella MM @ Aug 1 2005, 11:39 AM)
I did notice that they've reissued some Discworld books with 'adult' covers, in the style of Harry Potter, so this might prompt a wider acceptance of his work. Shallow as it may seem, it was those revolting Josh Kirby covers that put me off reading Pratchett for years.
*


They've been out for a while now and I have been tempted to buy the series again in the new covers but so far they have only done half the range, so I'm not sure they will do the rest (in which case there's no point in re-buying them) and I like the Josh Kirby covers (it's the later one's I'm not so keen on).

They do look jolly smart though, and if it gets more people reading them all the better!
Raven
QUOTE (Stella MM @ Aug 1 2005, 11:27 AM)
A timely bumping though. Have you seen this?:
What the hell is the last sentence all about? How can you speculate that Harry's 25, when he's 15 in the books?
*


Yeah, it's been posted in the Harry Potter thread here! smile.gif
Stella MM
QUOTE (Raven @ Aug 1 2005, 11:50 AM)
and I like the Josh Kirby covers (it's the later one's I'm not so keen on).
*

I loathe 'em. I don't know why Pratchett liked (or possibly tolerated) them, they seem to contain all the fantasy genre cliches that the books try to avoid, subvert or poke fun at. You've got the big-titted women, crusty wizards, knobbly-looking dwarves etc etc, whereas the Paul Kidby covers have a warmth, realism and humanity about them. And more importantly, the characters he draws look exactly how I always pictured them.
QUOTE (Raven @ Aug 1 2005, 11:51 AM)
Yeah, it's been posted in the Harry Potter thread here! smile.gif
*

Ah. I couldn't remember where I'd got the link from. Apologies, I'm not well today.
Sir_Robin_the_brave
To be fair Kirby's style of drawing was very much 'love or hate' I have found, my flatmate has the new black covered copy of 'Equal Rites' - which I must admit is very pretty looking. Anyone heard any info about when TPs next 'adult' Discworld book may surface? I need my fix!
Nonus Aequilibrium
QUOTE (maian @ Apr 19 2005, 05:27 PM)
Isn't Thud! the board game released a little while ago, i got it for Xmas and it's a great laugh if your a Pratchett fan.
*


Thud! (the book) is due out on the first of October, according to amazon and play... I've just preordered it now biggrin.gif
Chapman Baxter
QUOTE (Stella MM @ Aug 1 2005, 11:27 AM)
What the hell is the last sentence all about? How can you speculate that Harry's 25, when he's 15 in the books?
*


Read this for details, though it may make you regret asking the question.
Stella MM
QUOTE ( A very sad Harry Potter fan)
Having presented what evidence can be found it becomes almost imperative to also decide which actual mapping is the "right" one; if possible at all.

The interactive timeline on the DVD-ROM section of the "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" DVD puts year 0 as 1991, but it should be abundantly clear from this analysis that this identification actually fits the data very badly. As explained above the status of this piece of information isn't entirely clear. Some will certainly consider it canonical or very nearly so and therefore stick to the information there. Personally I am reluctant to accept the information as part of canon unless and until Rowling confirms this separately. For all I know her approval might have been of accuracy within the context of the films, which doesn't apply to the books. The same goes for other material that she has approved of; this approval is not necessarily proof that the information on the approved product is consistent with her intentions from the books.


Fuck me; I thought I had no life.
maian
I personally loathe the new designs for the Discworld books, it's just not right! Josh Kirkby had a great way of drawing things with such verve and imagination (I always assumed that they were a bit tongue-in-cheek really, showing all the cliches on the front and subverting them in the book sort of thing) and the new ones look so bland and lifeless, they don't show anything of the humour in the books which was clearly visible on all or Kirkby's front covers. I'm not a huge fan of Paul Kidby's (the guy who took over from Kirkby) cover designs since he just seemed to be trying to copy Kirkby's style (at least on the first few he did like Thief Of Time) although he has improved, though I don't think he'll better his cover for Night Watch.

As far as Pratchett's work goes: he's a genius and deserves much more success than he has got. But if he became successful what would be the fun in being a Discworld fan?
superfurryandy
QUOTE (maian @ Aug 1 2005, 10:40 PM)
As far as Pratchett's work goes: he's a genius and deserves much more success than he has got. But if he became successful what would be the fun in being a Discworld fan?
*

Became successful? He's sold 40 million books.

I know what you mean, though - he does get a fair amount of critical acclaim, but still seems to be sidelined as he's seen as a genre writer, never mind the social commentry and notes on the human condition he manages to pack into his books. And Sam Vimes has got to be one of the greatest ever literary creations.
Raven
QUOTE (Stella MM @ Aug 1 2005, 06:29 PM)
QUOTE ( A very sad Harry Potter fan)
Having presented what evidence can be found it becomes almost imperative to also decide which actual mapping is the "right" one; if possible at all.

The interactive timeline on the DVD-ROM section of the "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" DVD puts year 0 as 1991, but it should be abundantly clear from this analysis that this identification actually fits the data very badly. As explained above the status of this piece of information isn't entirely clear. Some will certainly consider it canonical or very nearly so and therefore stick to the information there. Personally I am reluctant to accept the information as part of canon unless and until Rowling confirms this separately. For all I know her approval might have been of accuracy within the context of the films, which doesn't apply to the books. The same goes for other material that she has approved of; this approval is not necessarily proof that the information on the approved product is consistent with her intentions from the books.


Fuck me; I thought I had no life.
*



I've seen many a Star Trek fan post material like that on the net, and they get very upset if you argue it with them! biggrin.gif
maian
QUOTE (superfurryandy @ Aug 1 2005, 10:10 PM)
I know what you mean, though - he does get a fair amount of critical acclaim, but still seems to be sidelined as he's seen as a genre writer, never mind the social commentry and notes on the human condition he manages to pack into his books.  And Sam Vimes has got to be one of the greatest ever literary creations.
*


It is unfair that he is sidelined but then again it's really difficult to sell his books to people who haven't read them before. My last night in halls was spent trying to get my copy of Going Postal back and I managed to get it back over dinner from the only guy in my block other than me who was a Discworld fan. We then had to try and describe the series to everyone else because they hadn't read the books. When one of them said ''Isn't that the one where the world is set on a disc on the back of a turtle?'' it became a bit harder to get across the fact that they were such monumentally brilliant books and that they satirised the whole fantasy genre.

Whereas people 'get' the Potter books cos they are straight (and, I've always thought, very lazy) fantasy, rather than trying to push the envelope in the way that Pratchett and other Fantasy writers have done, she just uses many of the old cliches. When my dad went to see the first film with me and my sister he just spent the whole film pointing out where she had stolen ideas from (some of them were fairly outlandish; it's unlikely that she had played Shining Force on the Mega-Drive let alone stolen the giant chess fight from it).

Don't get me wrong, I love the Potter series, but I love Discworld more and have always felt that Pratchett's work deserves to be more widely accepted than it is.
fatseff1234
The Discworld books kick ass, the're amazing.

My personal fav's are the death series and the watch series and Death is the best character.
Sir_Robin_the_brave
I might have to re-visit some of the earlier Discworld books now. I'd agree with Andy about Vimes, his character is brilliantly developed through the series and his exchanges with Vetenari are always highlights.
Silky
Nobby Nobs and Rincewind - best characters ever tongue.gif
Blind I/O
I quite like Vorbis and Brutha, but Vimes is certainly the best character from the series.
cueballthedog
QUOTE (m0r1arty @ Apr 19 2005, 01:49 PM)
Mort was by fr my fav, and I agree with Chapman Baxter about creating his own world with these, although the parodies were excellent too!

Robert Rankin is another funny writer too, worth checking out.

-m0r
*


love both pratchett read most of his
love rankin have pretty much read all the books
love the brentford trilogy all seven of them


and have just got into

tom holt whose quite funny along the same lines as rankin
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